Fox News 2024-02-02 20:03:23


Fani Willis admits personal relationship with Trump special prosecutor in GA election case

Embattled Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis has responded to allegations of an “improper” relationship she had with special prosecutor Nathan Wade, whom she hired to work the case against former President Donald Trump. 

According to court documents filed earlier this month by Michael Roman, a Trump co-defendant, Willis, who brought election interference-related charges against Trump, has been having an “improper” affair with Wade, whom she hired to help prosecute the 2024 GOP front-runner. Roman and his lawyers say the alleged impropriety should disqualify her from the case. 

In a court filing Friday, Willis told the superior court that while the allegations against her are “salacious,” they have no “merit.” 

Willis claims that while she and Wade “have been professional associates and friends since 2019,” “there was no personal relationship” between her and Wade in November 2021 at the time of Wade’s appointment, and that Roman and his lawyers “offer no support for their insistence that the exercise of any prosecutorial discretion (i.e., any charging decision or plea recommendation) in this case was impacted by any personal relationship.”

The filing claims that Roman’s motions “attempt to cobble together entirely unremarkable circumstances of Special Prosecutor Wade’s appointment with completely irrelevant allegations about his personal family life into a manufactured conflict of interest on the part of the District Attorney.”

TRUMP PROSECUTOR FANI WILLIS’ WHITE HOUSE MEETINGS WARRANT ‘VERY DEEP INVESTIGATION,’ EX-PROSECUTOR SAYS

The filing also says that “attacks on Special Prosecutor Wade’s qualifications are factually inaccurate, unsupported, and malicious, in addition to providing no basis whatsoever to dismiss the indictment or disqualify” him. 

“[T]he truth is that Wade has long distinguished himself as an exceptionally talented litigator with significant trial experience,” WIlls said in Wade’s defense. “He is a diligent and relentless advocate known for his candor with the Court, and a leader more than capable of managing the complexity of this case.”

“District Attorney Willis has made no public statements that warrant disqualification or judicial inquiry; and criticism of the process utilized to appoint and compensate the special prosecutors in this case demonstrates basic misunderstandings of rudimentary county and state regulations, and provides no legal basis for dismissal of the indictment or disqualification of any member of the prosecution,” the documents states.

Willis argued that motions filed by Roman and his legal team should be denied without the evidentiary hearing scheduled for Feb. 15. 

In those motions, Roman alleged that, Wade, who has no Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) and felony prosecution experience, billed taxpayers $650,000 at a rate of $250 an hour since his hiring.

Willis and Wade were both subpoenaed by Roman’s lawyer, Ashleigh Merchant, to testify at an evidentiary hearing on Feb. 15 before Fulton County Superior Court Judge Scott McAffee, who is presiding over the Trump case.  

Roman’s filing alleges that Wade billed Fulton County for 24 hours of work on a single day in November 2021, shortly after being appointed as a special prosecutor, and that Willis financially benefited from her alleged lover’s padded taxpayer-funded salary by taking lavish vacations together to Napa Valley, California; Florida; and the Caribbean together on his dime. 

Those filings also alleged that Wade was paid more than another prosecutor on the team, John Floyd, who reportedly has more RICO prosecution experience. 

Willis said Friday that “comparisons to the invoiced work of other special prosecutors
tasked with dramatically less time-consuming work and much more circumscribed roles are staggeringly off-mark.”

Merchant filed a separate lawsuit on Tuesday against the Fulton County DA’s office for failing to turn over records in compliance with the Georgia Open Records Act, accusing Willis and her team of apparently “intentionally withholding information” ahead of the hearing. 

Merchant said she had to repeatedly file certain requests after they were prematurely closed, and she was incorrectly told certain records did not exist, the lawsuit states.

On Friday morning, the House Judiciary Committee subpoenaed Willis related to the misuse of federal funds and allegedly firing a whistleblower in her office over the same issue. 

FANI WILLIS, WHO ‘RELISHED IN’ DONALD TRUMP PROSECUTION, SHOULD BE REMOVED FROM CASE FOR ILLICIT AFFAIR: EXPERTS

The subpoena requires Willis to turn over “all documents and communications referring or relating to the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office’s receipt and use of federal funds, including but not limited to, federal funds from the Department of Justice’s Office Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and Office of Community Oriented Policing Services.”

Additionally, she is being asked to turn over all documents from the same offices “referring to or relating to any allegations of the misuse of federal funds.” 

Willis’ office responded to the subpoena in a statement Friday saying, “These false allegations are included in baseless litigation filed by a holdover employee from the previous administration who was terminated for cause.”

“Any examination of the records of our grant programs will find that they are highly effective and conducted in cooperation with the Department of Justice and in compliance with all Department of Justice requirements. Our federal grant programs are focused on helping at-risk youth and seeking justice for sexual assault victims who were too long ignored,” her office said. 

“Our federal grant-funded Sexual Assault Kit Initiative has been cited by the United States Attorney General as a model program. We are proud of our grant programs and our partnership with the Department of Justice that makes Fulton County a safer, more just place,” the statement said.

Willis was scheduled to testify during the divorce proceedings of Wade and his estranged wife this week but narrowly avoided doing so. Just a day before that hearing was scheduled, the judge in that case announced that Nathan and Jocelyn Wade came to a temporary agreement, canceling Wednesday’s divorce proceeding. 

On Jan. 14, Willis addressed the allegations for the first time at Big Bethel AME Church in Atlanta, and she seemed to insinuate she believed the allegations to be race-based.

“They only attacked one,” she said. “First thing they say, ‘Oh, she’s gonna play the race card now.’”

“But no, God, isn’t it them that’s playing the race card when they only question one?,” Willis asked.

“You cannot expect Black women to be perfect and save the world,” Willis said, adding that “we need to be allowed to stumble. We need grace.” 

In the Georgia state legislature, two bills have been voted out of the House and Senate that would empower separate commissions to investigate Willis’ office. 

GEORGIA DA FANI WILLIS’ ALLEGED LOVER ASKS FOR PROTECTIVE ORDER IN DIVORCE CASE

Last week, Georgia’s GOP-controlled Senate voted to form a special committee that would have subpoena power to investigate Willis. Republican Sen. Greg Dolezal, who introduced the measure, said that “the multitude of accusations surrounding Ms. Willis, spanning from allegations of prosecutorial misconduct to questions about the use of public funds and accusations of an unprofessional relationship, underscores the urgency for a thorough and impartial examination.”

On Monday, the Georgia House members passed a bill to revive the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Qualifications Commission with powers to discipline and remove prosecutors, which Republicans could potentially use to target Willis.

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed legislation creating the commission last year, but after the state Supreme Court refused to approve the rules governing the committee’s conduct, it was unable to begin operating. The new measure passed by the House that now advances to the Senate, removes the requirement for Supreme Court approval.

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John Malcolm, a former assistant U.S. attorney in Atlanta, told Fox News Digital in an interview that the allegations against Willis are “serious.”

“They ought to be looked into, and it has certainly imperiled this prosecution and given a black mark, not only to Fulton County, but potentially to the entire state, so I can understand why the Georgia legislature is up in arms about this,” he said.

Malcolm, who currently serves as the director of the Meese Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, said that “this is a difficult moment” for Willis, who he says could ultimately decide to recuse herself from the case. 

The trial date for the sweeping racketeering case against the former president has not yet been set, and it’s not clear that should Willis and her team be removed or recused, a new prosecutor would pursue some or all of the charges against Trump. 

Dr. Baden explains how Chiefs fans likely died after drugs reportedly discovered

Forensic pathologist Dr. Michael Baden believes he knows the cause of death after fentanyl was reportedly discovered in the toxicology report for the three Kansas City Chiefs fans who were found dead in the snow two days after a game day gathering. 

Preliminary toxicology results show David Harrington, Clayton McGeeney and Ricky Johnson had cocaine and fentanyl in their systems, TMZ reported, citing sources with direct knowledge of the case.

“We have to wait for the official report to come out, but it appears, at this time, that there was fentanyl and other drugs present. Fentanyl is used by doctors because it’s a powerful painkiller, and one of the side effects is making a person sleepy, and what happened here, I think, could have been that before they used drugs together,” Baden said on “FOX & Friends.” 

“The one fellow who comes in and sleeps on the couch indoors sleeps it off,” Baden added, referring to Jordan Willis, who checked himself into rehab after the men were found dead outside his home. 

TOXICOLOGY REPORT BACK FOR KANSAS CITY CHIEFS FANS FOUND FROZEN TO DEATH

“The other three get sleepy and pass out outside, and because of the weather and because of the snow, the body temperature drops very quickly from 98 degrees to 80 degrees, at which point, less than an hour, the heart can’t beat anymore accurately, so they die of a cardiac arrest due to hypothermia,” Baden said. 

“It is very unusual for three people using — or four people — using drugs together to die simultaneously from fentanyl,” Baden continued. “The effects on people, it varies a great deal. So, it’s less likely to be overdoses, more likely to be hypothermia caused by passing out from the fentanyl.”

Willis has said that he slept inside on a sofa for nearly two days, unaware his friends had died outside. Baden explained that it’s not known yet what other drugs were found, but the reported levels of fentanyl were probably not enough to kill them alone despite it likely being the most powerful of the drugs they consumed. 

“It would be extremely unusual for a true overdose to kill them, but they would all get sleepy and if they pass out in the snow, they die. One of the factors is, it’s painless death,” he said. “They don’t have any pain when they pass out, or they don’t have any pain from the cold.”

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS FANS DEATHS: JORDAN WILLIS CHECKS INTO REHAB AS FAMILIES AWAIT TOXICOLOGY RESULTS

“FOX & Friends” co-host Lawrence Jones noted the fentanyl crisis plaguing America, which he said has people “dropping like flies” in some areas where it’s used to substitute for heroin or mixed with cocaine. 

“Most fentanyl deaths combined other drugs,” Baden said before co-host Brian Kilmeade asked if people can unknowingly consume fentanyl.

“That’s part of the problem. Fentanyl is very cheap. It’s very cheap for the drug lords… they can mix fentanyl with marijuana. They mix fentanyl with cocaine, and that’s why it’s much more powerful than the other drugs,” Baden said.  “So, the four of them may have not even known what they were getting. They might have thought they were getting cocaine, instead it’s fentanyl, and that’s why, as Lawrence said, we have to wait for the official toxicology report.” 

Ainsley Earhardt noted that since police have said the deaths are not being treated like a homicide, perhaps Willis admitted that drugs were involved. 

“The police come there, and they got things from the scene. So, they may have the package or whatever the drugs were contained in, and they would have known, and that’s why they said right away that it’s not a murder. They right away said, gave the impression it was a drug overdose, and the amount of the drug are going to be very important into being so certain about how the effects were. The initial report says trace of cocaine and fentanyl. Fentanyl is much more likely to cause death than cocaine,” Baden said. 

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Sarah Rumpf-Whitten and Christina Coulter contributed to this report. 

Biden allegedly assailed Trump using profanity behind closed doors

President Biden’s thoughts about former President Trump appear to be more vulgar behind closed doors than in public despite him and other Democrats routinely calling for “civility” and “decency” in politics.

On Biden’s first day in office, he lectured his staff about the importance of respect and said, “I am not joking when I say this, if you are ever working with me and I hear you treat another colleague with disrespect, talk down to someone, I promise you I will fire you on the spot. On the spot. No ifs, ands or buts.”  

However, Biden has been at the center of multiple reports detailing how he’s prone to outbursts and “angry interrogations” of staff when not in the public eye. That demeanor appears to have continued as the president takes aim at Trump in private to his close allies and aides.

During conversations with his confidantes, Biden has allegedly referred to Trump as a “sick f—” who enjoys seeing others encounter setbacks, Politico reported Thursday. 

WH AIDES CLAIM BIDEN PRONE TO OUTBURSTS, ‘ANGRY INTERROGATIONS’ BEHIND CLOSED DOORS: ‘GET THE F—K OUT’

The publication spoke to three individuals who heard Biden make the remarks. One of those individuals added Biden also recently called Trump a “f—ing a–hole.”

Trump’s campaign fired back at the president for his alleged comments.

“It’s a shame that Crooked Joe Biden disrespects the presidency both publicly and privately,” senior Trump campaign adviser Chris Lacivita told Politico. “But then again, it’s no surprise he disrespects the 45th president the same way he disrespects the American people with his failed policies.”

BIDEN’S HISTORY OF BERATING, SCOLDING AND INSULTING REPORTERS, FROM ‘STUPID SON OF A B—-’ TO ‘GET EDUCATED’

Conservatives took to social media Thursday evening blasting Biden for his comments about Trump.

Steve Guest, who previously worked for Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and the Republican National Committee, called Biden a “fraud” and included a screenshot of the report where Biden lectured his staffers about decency.

“As Biden tries to jail Trump through his Justice Dept, Biden’s operatives leak vulgar attacks on him,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton posted on X.

“Yes the angry, petty, vengeful man who rages about Trump in private would never sic his DOJ on his predecessor and 2024 competitor,” author Julie Kelly posted on X. “Rule of law and whatnot. I am sure Trump’s defense attorneys are VERY interested in this for selective prosecution claims.”

“Biden has always been a lowlife and ignoramus,” Fox News’ Mark Levin posted on X.

A White House spokesman, when asked for comment by Fox News Digital, used the word “snowflake” to describe media coverage of the president’s foul language.

Past reports have suggested Biden is inclined to yell at White House aides behind closed doors and drag them in for “angry interrogations.” The reports have alleged Biden has such a “quick-trigger temper” that some White House staffers attempt to dodge meeting him one-on-one.

“Some take a colleague, almost as a shield against a solo blast,” Biden aides said last summer.  

The president’s alleged outbursts have included expressions such as “God d—it, how the f— don’t you know this?!,” “Don’t f—ing bulls— me!” and “Get the f— out of here!”

Biden’s tactics generally came in the form of “angry interrogations” until it became apparent to others in the room that they didn’t know the answer to a question. It allegedly became so routine that staff named it “stump the chump.”

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“No one is safe,” one administration official previously said.

The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment. 

Fox News Digital’s Nikolas Lanum contributed to this report.

College basketball player ejected after punching opponent in the face

New Mexico State men’s basketball player Robert Carpenter will be sidelined for at least one game after he was ejected from Thursday night’s overtime victory over Liberty for punching forward Shiloh Robinson in the face. 

The incident took place early in the first half when Carpenter and Robinson got tangled up under the net with Carpenter looking for a rebound. 

As Robinson turned around to head down court, Carpenter swung at him from behind, appearing to hit him directly in the face. 

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“First and foremost, I just want to apologize to Liberty University coach (Ritchie) McKay for the incident,” New Mexico State men’s basketball coach Jason Hooten said during his post-game presser. “Even if there was something that put Rob in that state of mind to do what he did, it’s still not acceptable.” 

Carpenter, who is in his first season with the program after transferring from Mississippi Valley State, was issued a flagrant foul 2 and ejected from the game. According to ESPN, Robinson did not return. 

“First of all, that’s not the way that we’re going to do things here at New Mexico State University. I think everybody knows me. I think in my 31-year career and 14 as a head coach, I think everybody knows the type of person that I am,” Hooten continued. 

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“I’m very proud of the person I am, and our program will never do those kinds of things.” 

Hooten said he believes that Carpenter will be suspended for at least one game, but he could face more time on the bench if Conference USA deems necessary after reviewing the incident. 

“I think that every league that I’ve been in, normally it’s usually a game suspension for a fight, and then I would guess that Conference USA will get together and watch some video and see if it needs to be longer than that.” 

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Regardless, Hooten knows that Carpenter won’t play in Saturday’s home game against Jacksonville State.  

“My rule is that he won’t play on Saturday. He at least needs to sit out Saturday and then as we move forward we’ll figure out what the ramifications are beyond that.” 

Carpenter is a junior playing in his first season with the Aggies. 

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He previously played for Mississippi Valley State from 2021 to 2022, where he led the team in scoring, averaging 16.4 points. He also played a season at St. Bonaventure. 

“I know Robert really well – he’s a really, really, really good person and a really good kid,” Hooten said. “Again, I’m shocked at what happened but also know that there’s probably nobody now that’s more remorseful than him. I know he feels really bad about what he did and there’s just no room for that in the game at all, and I feel really bad as the coach – I feel responsible for that.”

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Mom goes dumpster diving for fun — says she’s found over $2,000,000 worth of items

A woman from Maryland has lucked out in her dumpster diving endeavors, claiming she’s accumulated $2 million worth of thrown-away goods. 

Jennifer Lleras, a 40-year-old mom of two from Baltimore, Maryland, took up dumpster diving 20 years ago while in college. 

At the time, Lleras said an art professor suggested the students start dumpster diving to look for materials for class, she told SWNS.

WOMAN CLAIMS SHE MAKES UP TO $5000 A MONTH FROM DUMPSTER-DIVING, CALLS IT A ‘REAL LIFE TREASURE HUNT’ 

Although she now makes enough money as the owner of a marketing agency, Lleras told SWNS that she enjoys “rescuing” items that are still in good shape. 

Lleras said she goes “treasure hunting” maybe once a week when she’s out and about running errands. 

Before going home, she’ll check the dumpsters near storefronts.

TEXAS MOM OF 4 DITCHES JOB TO BE A DUMPSTER DIVER, EARNS $1,000 A WEEK

“I find it fun … [but] I don’t think it saves me a ton of money because I keep things I like, not things I need,” she said.

She said her finds include a $500 Dyson Air Wrap hairdryer in perfect condition, a $500 Roomba vacuum cleaner and a $400 Le Creuset Dutch oven.

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The mom of two said her home now has a full security system, robot vacuums on every floor, a voice-activated trash can and high-end cookware, all thanks to her dumpster diving hobby. 

“I have even gifted dumpster finds to family before,” she told SWNS.

She continued, “My sister loves when I find decorations and kitchenware to go in her home.”

Lleras estimates a gain of $100,000 all told on items each year she finds in dumpsters around town. 

“It’s really sad that the stores could take this stuff and donate [it to a place where it] will be used, but they don’t.”

More than that, Lleras said she donates items that are in good shape, including party supplies, non-perishable goods and toys.

“It’s really sad that the stores could take this stuff and donate [it to a place where it] will be used, but they don’t,” she said. 

She also said that often, she’ll find items in good shape that have been destroyed with paint or bleach before being thrown away in an effort to stop people from dumpster diving.

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Lleras said she “finds that even worse than throwing it away.”

Although the business owner finds many good items that she could keep, Lleras said she isn’t a hoarder and that her house is not cluttered.

“My house isn’t cluttered, but if I find things I need or can use, I will hold onto them,” she said.

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Fox News Digital reached out to Lleras for further comment.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

Chargers’ Jim Harbaugh shares unusual plans for living arrangements in LA

Jim Harbaugh has big plans for his time in Los Angeles, and that includes some interesting living arrangements. 

The former longtime Michigan football coach was introduced as the Los Angeles Chargers’ new head coach on Thursday, when he discussed his plans for the future as he makes his long-awaited return to the NFL. 

“We’re in one of the great cities there is. One thing I know is Los Angeles, Southern California, they respect talent, effort and winning,” Harbaugh said. 

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“It needs to be multiple. Multiple championships. We’re going to be humble and hungry, but that’s our goal. That’s our goal, is to treat people in a first-class manner to win multiple championships.”

Among the goals Harbaugh has is to drive cross-country to California and park his RV somewhere scenic. 

He also wants to camp out in it — at least for a little while. 

JIM HARBAUGH OFFERS SIMPLE REASON FOR CHOOSING CHARGERS AFTER WINNING NATIONAL TITLE WITH MICHIGAN

“I told my wife this — should I tell them?” he paused, laughing. 

“Okay, so, I want to drive my RV out and go to a trailer park, like down by the water or by Disneyland. There are two that I’ve researched that are close to the facility. I want to ‘Jim Rockford‘ it for the next couple of months until we move into the new facility. I have that thought going through my head.” 

Before mentioning his plans to live the trailer-life, Harbaugh was sure to thank his wife for her support. 

“My beautiful wife, Sarah, who does so much. Thank goodness for mothers. All that you do in supporting me, supporting our family. The best, just the best thing that has happened to me. You’re the best, tremendous,” he said.

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Harbaugh agreed to terms on a five-year contract last week after nine seasons at the University of Michigan, including going 15-0 and winning the school’s first national championship since 1997 last month.

He will become the 19th coach in franchise history and the first former Chargers player to return to the team as head coach.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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State announces plan to cancel medical debt for all eligible residents

Connecticut will cancel medical debt for all eligible residents, its governor announced on Friday, making it the first state to do so.

Gov. Ned Lamont said during an appearance on “Good Morning America” that the state would erase medical debt for thousands of residents who qualify under a new initiative that intends to help lift people from an often tremendous financial burden.

“This is not something they did where they were spending too much money. This is because they got hit with a medical emergency, and they should not have to suffer twice: first for the illness, then with the debt,” Lamont said.

Eligible residents will not have to apply for the relief as the state will work directly with a contracted agency to eliminate medical debts. This relief should go into effect by June, the state said.

NYC MAYOR ERIC ADAMS ANNOUNCES $2B MEDICAL DEBT BAILOUT FOR UP TO 500K RESIDENTS

Those who ultimately have their debt cleared will also not have any associated tax burden, as the state said the IRS does not count medical debt canceled via nonprofits as taxable income.

According to “GMA,” qualifying residents include those “whose household income is up to 400% of the federal poverty line (for a family of four, that’s $156,000 annually) or whose medical debt equates to 5% or more of their annual income will be eligible under the program.”

The new state plan intends to leverage $6.5 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds to erase approximately $1 billion in medical debt, Lamont said.

AMERICANS STRUGGLE WITH $88 BILLION IN UNPAID MEDICAL DEBT: SURVEY

The governor initially announced the proposal on the same day last year, tying the relief to COVID-related funds.

“Several state and local governments have seen significant success at canceling medical debt for their residents using this model, and I think this is absolutely the right way to use this COVID-recovery funding,” Lamont said on Feb. 2, 2023.

He added: “This initiative will not only help Connecticut residents who are saddled with debt financially, but it also lifts the significant emotional toll that this type of debt has on individuals who do not have the means to get out, especially for those who are simultaneously experiencing significant medical problems. This debt erasure will put millions of dollars back into the Connecticut economy and provide an economic stimulus to local communities.”

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Nearly 1 in 5 households across the U.S. have at least some medical debt, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The median amount owed is $2,000.

While Connecticut is hoping to become the first state to erase medical debt, several cities, including New York City, New Orleans and Pittsburgh, have also announced or implemented similar plans.

‘Rocky’ actor Carl Weathers dead at 76

“Rocky” star Carl Weathers has died, according to a statement from his family. The actor was 76 years old. 

“We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Carl Weathers,” his family said in a statement. “He died peacefully in his sleep on Thursday, February 1st, 2024. … Carl was an exceptional human being who lived an extraordinary life. Through his contributions to film, television, the arts and sports, he has left an indelible mark and is recognized worldwide and across generations. He was a beloved brother, father, grandfather, partner, and friend.”

Weathers played Apollo Creed in the first four movies in the series. 

He also starred opposite Arnold Schwarzenegger in “Predator” and Adam Sandler in “Happy Gilmore.” 

Pro-Native American activists fight ‘anti-American’ movement to erase their culture

From coast to coast, wokeness is facing a rebellion.

Communities are fighting to reclaim their local heritage after a cancel-culture rampage in recent years eviscerated Native American images, nicknames and tributes at hundreds of schools nationwide. 

“We’re actually fighting an anti-American movement,” Lisa Davis, a pro-Native American activist in Cedar City, Utah, told Fox News Digital. 

NEWLY ELECTED SCHOOL BOARD IN PENNSYLVANIA RECLAIMS INDIGENOUS MASCOT, REJECTS CANCEL CULTURE

“The people trying to erase Native American culture are the same people trying to remove Thomas Jefferson and bashing American heritage.” 

Davis and other Cedar City residents formed the grassroots organization VOICE (Voices of Iron County Education) after the school board voted to eliminate the high school’s traditional Redmen name and logo in 2019. 

“It was an honor to be called the Redmen,” Julia Casuse, a “full-blooded Navajo” and graduate of Cedar City High School, told Fox News Digital. 

The silversmith said she tells visitors at the family’s shop, Navajo Crafting Co., “I’m a Redmen through and through.”

The school’s nickname is now the Reds. 

NATIVE AMERICAN GROUP THAT WANTED ‘REDSKINS’ REMOVAL IS FUNDED BY SOROS FOUNDATION, OTHER LEFTIST ORGS

Yet the irony of the new name is not lost on Cedar City residents. “We went from honoring centuries of American and Native American history to honoring communism,” said Davis.

“The people trying to erase Native American culture are the same people trying to remove Thomas Jefferson and bashing American heritage.” 

Eunice Davidson, a Dakota Sioux and president of the Native American Guardians Association (NAGA), told Fox News Digital, “It’s a terrible injustice to these communities,” 

She and others claim the decisions to remove Native American images, nicknames and logos are made by local school boards, which are often under pressure from well-funded outside forces. 

“The decisions never have popular support,” said Davidson, whose organization is based in North Dakota

“The taxpayer is being shunned and the school boards don’t care anymore. It’s Marxism and it’s taken over the school boards.”

The grassroots group VOICE claims that 79% of local residents voted in support of the Redmen in a recent Change.org survey. 

Battles all across the country

Communities around the nation are waging similar battles. 

Activists in Killingly, Connecticut are fighting to reclaim the town’s Redmen tradition after it was trampled by a statewide mandate to wipe out its own Native American legacy.

Cambridge, New York has taken its fight to save its beloved Indians tradition to the courts — after the Board of Regent announced its plan to trample Native American history across the Empire State. 

Local residents recently voted two new pro-Native American candidates onto its school board, including Iroquois Dillon Honyoust.  

“When you think about Native Americans, any icon that you see is about strength, honor, pride. Always a positive symbol to portray the strength of our heritage,” Honyoust said in an interview with WAMC Northeast Public.  

The school board in Southern York County, Pennsylvania voted in January to allow Susquehannock High School to bring back its traditional Warriors name and logo. 

The decision came after five new school board members won elections in November by running on pro-Native American platforms. 

“The decisions never have popular support … It’s Marxism and it’s taken over the school boards.”

“This movement was about erasing Native American culture and I wasn’t about to stand for it,” Jennifer Henkel, a mother of three children and one of the new school board members, told Fox News Digital previously.

The powerful group National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), based in Washington, D.C. has led the effort to erase Native American images in local communities around the nation. The organization is funded by benefactors such as George Soros’ Open Society Foundations, along with taxpayer dollars. 

The NCAI “has tracked the retirement of more than 200 unsanctioned Native ‘themed’ mascots since 2019, and has supported legislation banning the use of these mascots in multiple states,” the group said in a statement last year to Fox News Digital. 

The group is also largely responsible for the effort to force the NFL’s franchise in Washington, D.C., to drop its traditional Redskins name and the familiar Native American face that appeared on the team’s helmets.

Blackfoot Chief John Two Guns White Calf fought for Native American causes and counted President Calvin Coolidge among his sphere of influence. 

“Widely consumed images of Native American stereotypes in commercial and educational environments slander, defame and vilify Native peoples,” the NCAI claimed in a 2013 report that tilted public opinion against the Redskins and other Native American images. 

MEET THE AMERICAN WHO WAS REVERED AS THE ‘PATRON SAINT’ UNTIL HE WAS CANCELED: LENNI LENAPE CHIEF TAMMANY

The report, however, offered a dubious narrative. Among other omissions, the report’s lengthy history of the Redskins failed to mention Blackfoot Chief John Two Guns White Calf — even though he served as the face of the franchise for 48 years. 

He was one of the most influential Native Americans of the 20th century. He fought for Native American causes and counted President Calvin Coolidge among his sphere of influence. 

His proud facade appeared on Redskins helmets from 1972 until he was canceled in 2020. The NCAI scrubbed his name from its history of the franchise.

Fox News Digital reached out to the NCAI for further comment. 

Communities across the nation, however, are fighting to preserve their Chief White Calf Redskins logo. 

Voters in Sandusky, Michigan recalled three school board members who voted to eliminate the Redskins. They’ve since elected three new school board members who ran on promises to reclaim the Redskins. 

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Rick Spiegel, an activist in Sandusky who is leading the effort to reclaim the Redskins, said 2,100 registered voters in the town responded to a mail-in survey, with 90% supporting the traditional name. 

A survey at the high school revealed that 74% of students, and 53% of teachers, supported the Redskins.

Even so, the Sandusky High School teams are now known as the Wolves. 

“They’re trying to erase or eradicate Native American history,” said Spiegel. 

The Michigan communities of Camden, Pawpaw and Port Huron, he said, are fighting similar battles to preserve local traditions. 

The Red Mesa (Arizona) High School Redskins installed a new football field last year with a Redskins logo splashed across the 50-yard line. 

Students at Wellpinit (Washington) High School voted to keep the school’s Redskins mascot in March 2023, rejecting calls to erase history and heritage by local Democrat leaders. 

The student body is 87% Native American, according to the Department of Education.

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Kingston (Oklahoma) High School is also a majority Native American school that embraces the Redskins.

“The people that I’ve talked to — they have a sense of pride about our name, and about our mascot being the Redskins,” Kingston athletic director Taylor Wiebener told KXII.com in 2020.

Students and residents of Donna, Texas, and McCloud, Oklahoma, have repeatedly voiced support for their Redskins identity, despite constant pressure, according to Native American activist Andre Billeaudeaux.

Casuse, the Navajo alumna of Cedar City High School in Utah, claims her allegiance to the Redmen began when she arrived at the school from a Navajo reservation in New Mexico in the 1960s.

She was feeling homesick while attending her first home football game.

“It gave me a sense of honor … It was a proud feeling for me, a sense of my heritage.”

“All of a sudden I heard a very strong native beat. The school song,” she said. “It stopped me in my tracks. It was wonderful hearing that sound and the beautiful Native music.”

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She suddenly felt at home, she said, adding that she served as a member of the pep club throughout high school. 

“It gave me a sense of honor. I was never embarrassed about it, never felt any tinge of prejudice. It was a proud feeling for me, a sense of my heritage.”

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