Fox News 2024-03-06 22:33:54


Trump challenges Biden to debate ‘for the good of the country’

Former President Donald Trump is calling for debates between himself and President Biden ahead of the 2024 general election, saying he is willing to participate “anytime, anywhere, anyplace.” 

Trump, the 2024 GOP frontrunner and presumptive nominee, posted his offer on his Truth Social on Wednesday afternoon — just hours after former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, his last-standing Republican opponent, suspended her campaign. 

TRUMP INVITES NIKKI HALEY SUPPORTERS TO JOIN MAGA MOVEMENT, CELEBRATES SUPER TUESDAY VICTORIES

“It is important, for the Good of our Country, that Joe Biden and I Debate Issues that are so vital to America, and the American People,” Trump posted Wednesday. “Therefore, I am calling for Debates, ANYTIME, ANYWHERE, ANYPLACE! The Debates can be run by the Corrupt DNC, or their Subsidiary, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD).” 

“I look forward to receiving a response. Thank you for your attention to this matter!” Trump added. 

The Biden campaign fired back, shortly after Trump’s invitation. 

“I know Donald Trump’s thirsty for attention and struggling to expand his appeal beyond the MAGA base — and that’s a conversation we’ll have at the appropriate time in this cycle,” Biden campaign communications director Michael Tyler told Fox News Digital. “But if he’s so desperate to see President Biden in prime time, he doesn’t have to wait!” 

“He can join the tens of millions of Americans who will tune in to watch the State of the Union tomorrow night,” Tyler continued. “He might even learn a thing or two about bringing people together and actually delivering for the American people.”

TRUMP REACTS TO SUPER TUESDAY VICTORIES: ‘RARELY HAS POLITICS SEEN ANYTHING QUITE LIKE THIS’

Trump, also on Truth Social on Wednesday, signaled he would be watching Biden’s State of the Union — but will use it to campaign. 

“I am pleased to inform you that tomorrow night we will be doing a LIVE, Play by Play, of Crooked Joe Biden’s State of the Union Address,” Trump posted. “I will correct, in rapid response, any and all inaccurate Statements, especially pertaining to the Border and his Weaponization of the DOJ, FBI, A.G.s, and District Attorneys, to go after his Political Opponent, ME (something never done before in this Country!).” 

Trump added: “We did this once before to tremendous success – Beating All Records. It is important for the Country to get the TRUTH!” 

Meanwhile, as for potential debates, the Republican National Committee (RNC) in 2022 unanimously voted to withdraw from the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD). 

The RNC clarified that it is not moving away from the presidential debate format, but is rather objecting to the CPD’s control over the process. The CPD has organized presidential and vice presidential debates for more than 30 years.

“Debates are an important part of the democratic process, and the RNC is committed to free and fair debates,” RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel said in a statement at the time. “The Commission on Presidential Debates is biased and has refused to enact simple and commonsense reforms to help ensure fair debates including hosting debates before voting begins and selecting moderators who have never worked for candidates on the debate stage.”

The RNC, at the time, also added that a majority of the CPD’s board members had publicly disparaged former President Trump prior to the 2020 debates.

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Earlier in the day, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre was asked if Biden would debate Trump, but she did not directly respond. 

“That’s something for the campaign to speak to,” Jean-Pierre said. 

House passes $460B government funding bill despite conservative objections

The House of Representatives has passed a $460 billion bill to fund part of the federal government for the remainder of fiscal year 2024.

As expected, more Democrats voted for the bill than Republicans, and it passed 339-85. The issue of how to fund the government has splintered the House GOP’s razor-thin majority for much of this congressional term, with Republican hardliners pressuring their conference to drift toward significant spending cuts and conservative policy riders that the Democrats who control the White House and Senate have called nonstarters.

The 1,050-page bipartisan legislation is a package of six bills dealing with departments and agencies whose funding expires on Friday — Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the Justice and Commerce Departments; Energy and Water Development; the Department of Interior; and Transportation and Housing.

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Funding tied to Congress’ six remaining bills, which include the Department of Homeland Security and the Pentagon, expires on March 22.

Fox News Digital first reported last month that House GOP leaders were planning to jettison an earlier promise to pass 12 individual spending bills, something conservatives rallied around. Sources who spoke with Fox News Digital at the time blamed the Senate’s inaction on the seven individual bills passed by the House, which included elements Democrats dismissed as “poison pills.”

BIDEN’S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS: BRET BAIER, MARTHA MACCALLUM TO LEAD FOX NEWS CHANNEL’S SPECIAL COVERAGE

Confronted with the broken promise during his weekly press conference on Wednesday, House Speaker Mike Johnson countered that change was incremental in Washington and pointed out that splitting the 12 bills into at least two packages ended the Democrat-backed tradition of folding them all into a massive “omnibus” spending bill, which has been the case since 2018.

“We committed to do 12 separate appropriations bills… the reason that it’s been so difficult to do it is because Washington has no muscle memory on how to do that,” Johnson said.

“It takes a long time to turn an aircraft carrier, and we’re doing that gradually. We’re forcing reforms, trying to force Congress back into the mode, the statutory mode, the lawful mode, and the way in which it’s supposed to work with regard to government funding.”

But GOP hardliners are still unhappy with the bill, arguing Johnson did not fight hard enough for conservative policy reforms and steeper spending cuts.

CONGRESSIONAL LEADERS STRIKE SHORT-TERM DEAL TO AVOID GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

The House Freedom Caucus insisted, without elaborating, that it was still an “omnibus” spending bill.

“Despite giving Democrats higher spending levels, the omnibus text released so far punts on nearly every single Republican policy priority. Worst of all, the omnibus surrenders Republicans’ leverage to force radical Democrats to the table to truly secure the southern border and end the purposeful, dangerous mass release of illegal aliens into the United States,” the group said.

Democrats, meanwhile, were jubilant that the bill did not include right-wing measures on abortion access, transgender care and critical race theory, among others.

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“I am very proud to say we successfully defeated the vast majority of the extreme cuts and hundreds of harmful policy riders proposed by House Republicans,” Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., the top Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee, said before the final vote.

The bill now heads to the Senate, where it’s expected to pass, before hitting President Biden’s desk.

James Caan’s son says his dad told him to ‘stay away’ from showbiz

Scott Caan was warned about Hollywood by his father, James Caan, before he pursued a career in show business.

Scott, 47, spoke to Fox News Digital at the 2024 FOX Spring Preview for the second season of FOX’s “Alert: Missing Persons Unit” about his relationship with his Academy Award-winning dad.

Scott says he didn’t always know he’d become an actor. 

“Not until I was a late teen, like 18 or 19 years old,” he shared. “I was always an athlete, and my old man told me that this business was goofy and [to] stay away from it. “

PIERCE BROSNAN WILL ‘CHERISH FOREVER’ HIS TIME WITH THE LATE JAMES CAAN

Scott did not always dream of being an actor.

“I would do anything to not go to school, so I had all these different creative ideas. Anything to not finish high school and go to college,” he recalled. “I sort of got lucky and met a director and ended up on a set somehow.”

As for his famous dad’s professional advice, Scott said, “It’s funny because he was pretty contradictory. He would say, ‘Don’t take it too seriously,’ but then he also took it very seriously. He always just said, ‘Look, work’s not your life,’ and I think it’s a good lesson.

“You gotta be passionate about what you do and love what you do, but, at the same time, it can’t be the most important thing. You’ll die in it.”

James Caan became a household name after his breakout role as Sonny Corleone in “The Godfather.” He earned an Academy Award and a Golden Globe nomination for the role. James died in 2022 from a heart attack at the age of 82.

Scott is one of James’ five children. The late actor was also a father to James, Jacob, Alexander and Tara.

WATCH: Scott Caan shares advice from his late father James Caan 

JAMES CAAN REMEMBERED BY HOLLYWOOD: ‘GODFATHER’ STAR HONORED WITH TRIBUTES FOLLOWING HIS DEATH AT 82

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Caan is starring as Jason Grant on the second season of FOX’s “Alert: Missing Persons Unit,” which debuted Tuesday.

“Each episode features a heart-pounding, life-or-death search for a missing person headed by detectives Jason Grant and Nikki Batista,” according to the show’s summary. “Jason and Nikki, once married, have a very personal connection to these cases as their own young son went missing and was never found. 

“The emotional toll of their son’s disappearance blew up their marriage, but even though they’ve moved on, their bond remains.”

WATCH: Scott Caan reveals when he knew he wanted to follow in dad James Caan’s footsteps

The show is set within the missing persons unit of the Philadelphia Police Department, showcasing how every moment is crucial when searching for a missing person. 

He told Fox News Digital this “whole season was rough” to film.

“Trying to figure out if the kid is yours or not, the kid that you have adopted, and you don’t know if it’s actually your kid. I mean, to play that over and over again for 10 episodes — it was brutal,” he said of the new season. “It was like non-stop, emotionally draining and kind of screwed with your head at times.

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“That whole season was rough. I think it was great, I think we did a good job with it, but I’m glad that section of this show is behind us because it’s crazy to relive that for 10 episodes.”

The “Hawaii Five-O” actor is a father himself. Scott and his partner, Kacy Byxbee, welcomed their daughter, Josie, in 2014. Playing the role of James Grant in “Alert: Missing Persons Unit” allowed Caan to reflect on his own approach to parenting. 

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“You can’t hover over your kids. You gotta let them figure it out,” he said. “I mean, I feel like I learned the most being on my own. You just try to teach them to be smart and good humans and avoid trouble if they can, but they’re gonna get into trouble. You can’t, like, hover over your kids.”

Season 2 of “Alert: Missing Persons Unit” is airing now on FOX.

Dem senator blocks bill to detain illegal immigrants charged with violent crime

Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, attempted to force a floor vote Wednesday on a law that would require illegal immigrants who commit violent crimes be detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), in the hope of preventing avoidable attacks and resulting deaths. 

The Iowa Republican’s unanimous consent request was thwarted by Majority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., who objected to the request. 

Ernst requested unanimous consent from her colleagues in order to advance Sarah’s Law to the floor for a vote. During her speech she pleaded with colleagues to pass her bill, recalling the death of Sarah Root and also referencing the recent death of Laken Riley, both allegedly at the hands of illegal immigrants. 

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The bill would require ICE to take into custody illegal immigrants who are arrested and charged with causing the death or serious injury of another. This was reiterated by Ernst during her speech. “It would merely require ICE to detain, just to detain, otherwise deportable illegal immigrants charged with killing or seriously injuring another person,” she said. 

Durbin claimed the bill would detain victims of trafficking or domestic abuse who were charged with crimes. According to him, the bill would “deprive immigrants of the due process that everyone is afforded.”

The measure’s namesake, Sarah Root, was a 21-year-old Iowa woman who was killed by a drunk driver who was also in the country illegally. Ernst noted that the suspect, Edwin Mejia, was able to post bond and ultimately escape facing the court. 

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“Citing the Obama administration’s November 2014 memo on immigration enforcement priorities, ICE declined to take custody of Mejia, despite his repeated driving offenses and history of skipping court dates,” Ernst explained. 

Riley, the 22-year-old University of Georgia nursing student also referenced by the senator, was killed last month. Another illegal immigrant, Jose Ibarra, was arrested and has been charged with several crimes, including malice murder and felony murder, among others. 

News of Riley’s killing made headlines across the country last month and has prompted congressional Republicans to demand answers. “The reality is Laken’s heartbreaking story did not have to happen,” Ernst said.

According to the senator, both Root and Riley’s deaths are “doomed to be repeated,” under the current policies. 

MCCONNELL ENDORSES TRUMP FOR PRESIDENT AFTER SUPER TUESDAY RESULTS: ‘HE WILL HAVE MY SUPPORT’

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The senator pointed to the immigration practice known as “catch and release,” during which illegal immigrants seeking entry on the basis of asylum are released during the processing period. “Instead of being detained while he was processed, he was released into our country — never to be heard from again,” she said. 

While Ibarra may have been prevented from allegedly killing Riley had he been detained upon entry to the country, Sarah’s Law would not have stopped the attack, as Ibarra’s criminal record doesn’t include crimes in which others were killed or injured.  

Ukraine reportedly destroys prized Russian vessel, UK praises major victory

Ukraine’s latest naval victory may prove its most critical as British intelligence determines the destruction of Russia’s Sergei Kotov ship will “limit” the Russian Black Sea Fleet

“This is the third Russian Black Sea Fleet vessel sunk in the past five weeks,” the British Ministry of Defense wrote in an update posted to social media platform X. “Likely because of Black Sea Fleet losses, on 15 February 2024, the Black Sea Fleet Commander, Admiral Viktor Sokolov, was dismissed.” 

“Ukraine continues to limit the freedom of maneuver of the Russian Navy in the Black Sea,” the ministry stressed. 

Kyiv claimed on Tuesday it had sunk the warship using high-tech sea drones, striking well behind the front line in what would be an impressive display of strength and capability from the Ukrainian forces. The attack reportedly killed seven crew members and injured six others, while Russian forces managed to rescue 52 others.

HOW PUTIN’S GOVERNMENT SHIFTED FROM TOLERATING DISSENT TO FORCEFUL SUPPRESSION

The British intelligence update confirms the destruction of the Sergei Kotov, which Moscow only commissioned into the fleet in July 2022. The warship had survived two other unmanned surface vessels (USV) and sustained only minor damage, swiftly returning to service on both occasions. 

Ukraine military intelligence (HUR) said its forces used the Magura V5 drone in all three attacks – including the one that finally sunk the warship. The Magura V5 unmanned vessels are designed and built in Ukraine and laden with explosives, according to The Associated Press. 

Two drones struck the ship, with the second strike causing a large blast. The crew of the Sergey Kotov had fired on the drones, trying to stop them before they struck, a private security firm said after claiming to analyze footage obtained from a crew member on a merchant vessel in the port of Feodosia, Crimea, where the attack occurred. 

VIOLENT PROTESTS GRIP POLAND AS FARMERS CLASH WITH POLICE OVER UKRAINE IMPORTS

Moscow claimed that it responded on Wednesday with a high-precision missile strike on a hangar in the industrial port area of Odesssa, where Ukraine developed some of its USVs, the Russian Ministry of Defense wrote on social media platform VK. 

“The goal of the strike has been achieved. The target is defeated,” the ministry wrote. 

The destruction of the Sergei Kotov continues Ukraine’s unexpected run of victories over the Black Sea Fleet, which started at a time when Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy appeared to start running short on evidence his forces could continue to register wins over Russian forces.

Ukraine had built up its forces for a much-touted counteroffensive in 2023, but Russia managed to pull together and dig in for a staunch defense that stymied any Ukrainian gains over the summer months. Officials expressed their frustrations with biting remarks whenever anyone questioned them about the lack of results from the push. 

INTERNATIONAL COURT ISSUES ARREST WARRANTS FOR RUSSIAN OFFICERS OVER ATTACKS ON UKRAINE’S INFRASTRUCTURE

“Criticizing the slow pace of (the) counteroffensive equals … spitting into the face of (the) Ukrainian soldier who sacrifices his life every day, moving forward and liberating one kilometer of Ukrainian soil after another,” Ukraine’s Foreign Minister Dmitro Kuleba told reporters on Thursday.

“I would recommend all critics to shut up, come to Ukraine and try to liberate one square centimeter by themselves,” he said at a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Spain.

The success of the Ukrainian fleet started in September after Moscow, emboldened by their successes at frustrating the Ukrainian counteroffensive, refused to renew a United Nations-brokered deal to secure passage of grain through the Black Sea. Kyiv struck back, destroying over a dozen of Russia’s ships over the following months.

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Russia eventually had to shift its naval forces away from the western part of the Black Sea in order to protect its assets as Russian President Vladimir Putin reorganized its command. 

Reuters contributed to this report. 

Biden ready to handle hecklers during State of the Union, Karine Jean-Pierre says

The White House said Wednesday that President Biden will be ready for anything during Thursday night’s upcoming State of the Union address, including hecklers.

White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre was asked during Wednesday’s briefing whether Biden was prepared for hecklers during the State of the Union.

Last year, chaos erupted briefly in the House chamber when Biden repeated an old Democratic talking point that has long been debunked, saying, “Some Republicans want Medicare and Social Security to sunset.”

Biden said that stance was not from the majority, though he invited anyone who doubted his claim to contact his office and he would provide them with a copy of the proposal.

KARINE JEAN-PIERRE BATTLES PRESS OVER BIDEN’S RELIANCE ON NOTECARDS: ‘THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR INTERJECTING’

Still, after making the statement, Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga, shouted, “Liar!”

The hecklers became so bad, then Republican House Speaker Kevin McCarthy shushed them when they interrupted the president’s tribute to a fentanyl victim.

So, when asked whether Biden would be prepared for hecklers this year, Jean-Pierre referred the reporter to how the president handled the hecklers last year.

BIDEN’S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS: TOP 5 MOMENTS

“Look, you saw the president last year when some Republican members behaved in a way that was, I would say, disrespectful. And he handled that, and he did that on his own and he held them to account as it related to important programs that matter to the American people: Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid,” Jean-Pierre said. “He called them out on it as they were obviously heckling at him. And so, the president’s ready for anything.”

She was asked again about the president’s preparation, and said he knows how to manage hecklers, as he showed in February 2023.

“Nobody was expecting that,” Jean-Pierre said. “And he took them on and laid out and fought for the American people on programs that matter to them. And so, he, you know, he got this. The President’s got this.”

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Jean-Pierre gave a preview of what Biden is expected to talk about during Thursday’s annual speech to the nation.

“He’s gotten more done in the first three years than most presidents have accomplished in two terms,” said Jean-Pierre, who added Biden will talk about the success of lowering drug prices and getting rid of junk fees.

Biden will also talk about his plan to “improve the lives of all Americans,” by lowering costs on health care premiums, taking on big pharma to lower drug prices and making the wealthy and corporations pay their “fair share” in taxes.

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Additionally, Jean-Pierre said Biden will speak about protecting women’s reproductive health despite attacks from Republican elected officials, and ending cancer as we know it, among other things.

Rep. Katie Porter swipes at opponent Adam Schiff after Super Tuesday upset

California Democrat Katie Porter took a swipe at Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and special interest groups after losing the open Senate primary, suggesting that Schiff’s campaign spent millions “peddling lies” and ultimately boosted the Republican in the race, former baseball player Steve Garvey, on Super Tuesday.

“We’re standing three to one in TV spending and an onslaught of billionaires who spent millions peddling lies,” Porter said in her concession speech Tuesday night. “And our opponent’s spending more to boost the Republican than promoting his own campaign.”

“While the votes are still coming in, we know that tonight we’ll come up short,” Porter said just after 9 p.m. Tuesday. “Our opponents threw everything — every trick, millions of dollars, every trick in the playbook — to knock us off our feet. But I’m still standing in high heels.”

She added, “Because of you, we have the establishment running scared.” 

TREY GOWDY FIRES BACK AT KATIE PORTER, CNN WRITER’S RESPONSE TO LAKEN RILEY MURDER: ‘DO NOT LECTURE US’

Porter, a progressive Democrat who has been representing Orange County since 2019, later said in her speech she “never considered” running for office “until [Donald] Trump was elected” in 2016. She rose to popularity helped by viral moments questioning Big Pharma CEOs during congressional hearings and publicly defied big corporate campaign backing.

However, Porter herself has received millions of dollars from big donors to boost her campaign, despite touting her record of not accepting corporate PAC money. She has reportedly accepted thousands of dollars in donations from big Wall Street donors, according to federal campaign finance disclosures.

Additionally, according to Open Secrets — a nonprofit that tracks government campaigns — Porter received just over $50,000 in PAC donations, more than $32,000 from Apple and Google, more than $58,000 collectively from the Universities of California San Francisco and Irvine, just under $16,000 from Kaiser Permanente and over $600,000 from lawyers and law firms. 

ADAM SCHIFF COULD UNITE CALIFORNIANS IN SENATE BID, BUT TO GOP CANDIDATE’S BENEFIT: KEVIN MCCARTHY

Porter raised just under $28 million in her Senate campaign, trailing slightly behind Schiff’s $31 million. Rep. Barbara Lee, another Democrat seeking the open Senate seat, raised $4 million, and Republican Garvey raised just over $2 million. Under California’s primary system, the top two candidates in the primary election will face off in the general election in November.

According to a Washington Post report last month, Porter also redirected at least half a million dollars in ads attacking another GOP contender, Eric Early, describing him as a “100% pro-Trump candidate” who is “way more dangerous than Steve Garvey.”

The highly contested seat was held for more than 30 years by former Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., until her death last year, prompting Gov. Gavin Newsom to appoint Democrat Sen. Laphonza Butler to fill the vacancy.

Ahead of Tuesday’s election, Schiff, a Burbank Democrat and congressman since 2001, spent millions of dollars on campaign ads describing Garvey as someone who “voted for Trump, twice, and supported Republicans for years, including far right conservatives,” according to one ad.

The move to paint long-shot Republican opponent Garvey as a staunch Trump ally was seen as an effort to squeeze out Porter and Lee from the race — giving Schiff a higher likelihood of winning the general election instead of splitting the vote between Democrats in the deep blue bastion.

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Garvey and Schiff will face off in the fall. Schiff is expected to win, but Garvey said during his victory speech on Tuesday, “They say in the general election we’re going to strike out. That’s from the crowd that believes in the status quo.”

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Schiff, whose victory speech was interrupted by protesters calling for a cease-fire in the Israel-Palestine conflict, said, “We are so lucky, so lucky to live in a democracy where we all have the right to protest.”

“We are so lucky to live in that kind of democracy, and we want to make sure we keep this kind of democracy,” he said.

Fox News Digital has reached out to Schiff, Lee, Porter and Garvey’s campaigns for comment. 

Woman survives after minutes without pulse, warns others about sudden cardiac arrest

A Minnesota woman who went 25 minutes without a pulse is sharing her survival story to raise awareness of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Cheryl Jordan Winston was 48 years old in 2020 when she collapsed in her bedroom after experiencing SCA. 

Her husband performed CPR until the paramedics arrived and shocked her with an AED (automated external defibrillator).

HAIR LOSS AND PROSTATE MEDICATION COULD ALSO REDUCE HEART DISEASE RISK, STUDY FINDS

Winston was taken to the hospital and put in a medically induced coma, where she remained for two weeks. 

“Despite being without a pulse for 25 minutes, I have no long-term side effects and have been able to return to normal life,” she told Fox News Digital in an interview.

Prior to experiencing her SCA, Winston had no symptoms at all — no fatigue or chest pain. She would later learn that it’s common for there to be an absence of symptoms prior to that type of cardiac event.

“I’ve also had no prior history of heart issues,” she said. “While there’s some family history of high blood pressure, there was nothing unusual in my family that would be linked to sudden cardiac arrest.”

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As part of a worldwide clinical study, Winston received an implanted cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), the Medtronic Aurora EV-ICD, to prevent future life-threatening episodes.

“It monitors my heart, and if it sees an arrhythmia, it will provide therapy to return my heart rhythm to normal before a cardiac arrest,” she said. “I feel it’s added protection for me, since they never found a cause for my cardiac arrest.”

Within two weeks, Winston was able to return to work and normal activities.

“I am feeling great,” she told Fox News Digital. “I make it a point to continue exercising regularly and focus on eating a healthy diet, just as I did before experiencing sudden cardiac arrest.”

HEART HEALTH RISK FACTORS FOR WOMEN OVER AGE 50: ‘DON’T IGNORE NEW SYMPTOMS,’ EXPERTS WARN

Dr. Alan Cheng, chief medical officer of Medtronic’s cardiac rhythm management division in Minneapolis, warned that cardiac arrest often results from a dangerously fast heart rhythm, and is deadly if not treated immediately. 

“For patients at risk of developing these abnormal rhythms or who have already suffered cardiac arrest, we implant a stopwatch-sized defibrillator,” he told Fox News Digital. 

“They monitor the heart’s rhythms 24×7, and deliver either a high-energy shock or low-energy, nearly undetectable, pacing pulses to restore the heart to a normal rhythm.”

ICDs have been around for more than 40 years, Cheng noted — but the one Winston received is different than the traditional version.

“ICDs are traditionally placed in the upper chest, with thin wires, called leads, threaded through the veins into the heart,” he said.

“Despite being without a pulse for 25 minutes, I have no long-term side effects and have been able to return to normal life.”

“They work extremely well in saving lives, but there are potential complications associated with those leads in the heart. With the new Aurora EV-ICD, that lead is placed outside the heart, under the sternum (breastbone).”

What to know about SCA

SCA is common and may account for about 15% of total fatalities, according to Dr. Mustali Dohadwala, medical director and practitioner at cardiology-focused private practice Heartsafe Boston. 

(Dohadwala was not involved in Winston’s care.) 

The doctor confirmed that sudden cardiac arrest typically occurs without any preceding signs or symptoms.

“Unfortunately, it can be an unheralded event that comes on spontaneously without warning,” he told Fox News Digital. “Up to 50% of those affected by SCA might have symptoms weeks prior to an SCA event or up to just minutes preceding an SCA.”

These symptoms may manifest as chest pain, shortness of breath, racing or skipping heart, lightheadedness or dizziness.

WHEN MEASURING HEART ATTACK RISK, ONE IMPORTANT RED FLAG IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED, DOCTORS SAY

“If someone experiences any of these symptoms, they should seek additional help and medical attention or have someone nearby call 911 immediately,” said Dohadwala.

Who is at highest risk?

SCA can stem from a multitude of conditions, Dohadwala noted, including advanced lung disease, significant sleep disorders, an extraordinarily stressful or anxiety-provoking situation, a severe injury, substance abuse or unintentional overdose of prescribed medications.

“However, it is most likely to occur in people who already have an underlying heart condition, whether it’s previously known or unknown,” Dohadwala said. 

“SCA is the initial manifestation of significant coronary heart disease in 15% of those who suffer from this event.”

Risk of SCA also rises with age and other risk factors such as diabetes, uncontrolled cholesterol, cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol consumption or a strong family history, he added.

Men are up to three times more likely to suffer SCA than women. 

“Reasons for this are not well understood, but some researchers have considered that the estrogen hormone that is produced by a woman’s body might have beneficial effects on blood cholesterol levels, as well as protective effects on blood vessels,” Dohadwala said.

Tips for surviving and preventing SCA

Sudden cardiac arrest is particularly dangerous, Dohadwala said, “because it occurs as a result of sudden cessation of mechanical activity of the heart, resulting in a non-viable pulse and collapse of blood pressure, which can lead to sudden death.”

The doctor added, “Despite the many advances in the treatment of heart disease, the outcome and survival of patients suffering SCA remain poor.”

To increase chances of survival, Dohadwala recommends immediate CPR (chest compressions) and defibrillation with an AED to restore electrical activity, heart muscle contraction and a viable pulse.

“This can improve the survival and overall outcomes significantly when compared with people suffering SCA receiving more delayed CPR from EMS personnel,” he said.

“Despite the many advances in the treatment of heart disease, the outcome and survival of patients suffering SCA remain poor.”

Dohadwala also recommends an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, like the one Winston has, to prevent the recurrence of another potentially deadly event.

For patients who have one or more coronary artery blockages, treatment may also include an angioplasty, placing of stents or a surgical coronary artery bypass, he said.

Winston echoed the importance of people learning to perform CPR.

“It saved my life,” she said. “Fewer women receive bystander CPR, which needs to be administered quickly in a case of sudden cardiac arrest.”

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She also emphasized that patients — women in particular — need to be their own medical advocates.

“It’s important for women to advocate for not only their heart health, but their health in general,” she said. “You know your body best, so if something feels wrong, go to your doctor to get checked.”

Dohadwala noted that adjustments in medications and healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce SCA risk. 

“It is possible that a heart-healthy lifestyle leading to controlled blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels through a thoughtful and discretionary diet, increasing regular physical activity, intentional weight loss, and stopping cigarette smoking might reduce SCA events,” he said.

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For those with a family history, genetic screenings might be an option. 

“The more awareness and knowledge we have about our health history, the better chance we have of avoiding problems like SCA in the future,” Dohadwala added.

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews/health.

Google’s fiasco is ‘the tip of the iceberg,’ reveals severe consequences of AI bias

Substantial backlash against Google’s Gemini artificial intelligence (AI) chatbot has elevated concern about bias in large language models (LLMs), but experts warn that these issues are just the “tip of the iceberg” when it comes to the potential impact of this tech across industries.

The rapid advancement of AI has led to significant advancements in various fields. It can help analyze medical imagery like mammograms and X-rays, accelerate the development of new drug treatments, optimize energy use and assist businesses in making informed decisions based on sorting large quantities of data.

However, the adoption of AI by governments and corporations for its problem-solving capabilities has also been met with considerable caution.

Adnan Masood is recognized as Microsoft Regional Director and MVP (Most Valuable Professional) for Artificial Intelligence by Microsoft. As Chief Architect of AI and Machine Learning at UST, he collaborates with Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab, MIT CSAIL, and leads a team of data scientists and engineers building AI solutions.

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“Artificial intelligence is an amazing catalyst for digital transformation. Everywhere from wealth management to population health to touchless retail operations, technologies like machine learning and computer vision are making algorithms fast, portable and ubiquitous,” he told Fox News Digital.

But he also highlighted the possibility of substantial downsides as well. Asking people to identify the threat they see coming from AI will garner a range of answers, from “the robots are taking our jobs” to “Big Brother is watching us.” While Masood admits these are all reasonable concerns, he believes the most significant challenge humanity faces from AI lies at the “heart” of its algorithms.

“AI systems are not created in a vacuum. Their behaviors reflect the best – but also the very worst of human characteristics,” he told Fox News Digital. “These models are prejudiced – and it is up to us to fix them.”

According to Masood, self-perpetuating bias is the biggest threat posed by AI and can have a “devastating impact” on health, job opportunities, access to information and even democracy.

The question is: What can society do to modify data that simply reflects ingrained societal biases? Currently, there are no regulations around algorithmic accountability. Masood believes some organizations and governments are making progress.

“With AI evolving at such a dramatic speed, already-problematic societal inequalities are being reinforced even as I write. And if we don’t tread carefully, these models will cause irreparable damage,” he said.

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LexisNexis Risk Solutions Global Chief Information Security Officer Flavio Villanustre told Fox News Digital the potential impact of AI models can range from “slightly inappropriate” responses to outcomes that could break existing anti-discrimination laws. Depending on its application, AI could cause issues in company hiring processes and wrongly inform decisions related to state benefits eligibility, loan rates, college admissions and “countless” other possibilities.

Masood agreed that wrongfully using automation to streamline state government work and the recruitment screening process is a salient yet everyday example of how machine learning algorithms can exacerbate systematized biases.

In 2018, Amazon discovered that its AI hiring software discriminated against resumes mentioning women and candidates from all-women colleges. The algorithm was merely basing its decisions on the company’s limited history of hiring female engineers and computer scientists. The software was later scrapped. 

That same year, studies found that Microsoft AI’s facial recognition software assigned Black males more negative emotions than their White counterparts.

“These examples are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the way technology can amplify oppression and undermine equality,” he said. “With AI becoming more ubiquitous, cases become larger by orders of magnitude, paving the way to a dystopian future of machine-rule.”

Masood noted there are also troubling instances of AI racism embedded in justice systems, as was the case when it was discovered the COMPAS algorithm had discriminated against people of color.

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“If these issues are not concerning enough, we are starting to see a more pervasive use of these models in medical applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. If, due to bias, a model incorrectly assesses the condition of a patient or the appropriate treatment, it could lead to life-altering consequences,” Villanustre added.

Kirk Sigmon, a Washington D.C.-based attorney specializing in artificial intelligence/machine learning (ML) intellectual property, suggested that “virtually all” AI models are biased.

He noted that artificial neural networks are trained on voluminous amounts of data based on what is available. This includes texts from books, images from the Internet, and more. As a result, whatever limitations are present in that data become “weaknesses” of the trained model.

“Google’s approach to hiding the bias in its models is via secret prompt engineering – that is, changing the nature of what you ask the model to do by adding additional words/content (like multicultural). This also seems to be the approach taken by OpenAI in their ChatGPT product. The problem is, they’ve not actually fixed the underlying bias at all: they’re just secretly changing what users ask for to avoid public relations issues, promote a particular agenda, or the like,” he told Fox News Digital.

Sigmon said this often results in significantly less helpful, “if not outright comical” outputs, discouraging users from using the tool. Gemini was the latest AI to face heat for its responses after it produced historically inaccurate images that downplayed or outright removed White people. This led to public apologies by Google and a pause on the image generation feature.

“If society plans to increasingly rely on tools like ChatGPT and Gemini, the implications of secretive prompt engineering can be frightening. We might not have much of an issue with an AI model trying to avoid outright or inadvertent racism, but the very same secret prompt modification strategies might be used to change the public’s perception of historical events, bury company scandals, or the like,” Sigmon said.

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“In other words, the very same strategies used by Google to ensure output is multicultural and inoffensive could be used to manipulate the public in extremely damaging ways,” he added.

Ruby Media Group CEO Kris Ruby, who recently uncovered a trove of data on Gemini, told Fox News Digital that biased AI can recreate societal norms, cultures and values that can strip historical context. If facts are removed or altered, a corporation can cultivate its own set of “facts” that align with its personal worldview.

Ruby, who wrote “The Ruby Files – The Real Story of AI Censorship,” stressed those in charge of shaping the current information environment must be held accountable, as the architecture of AI products can alter the future digital landscape society depends on for education and commerce.

Furthermore, if the data scientists responsible for making critical decisions lack political diversity, users will be left with a “lopsided product” that “skews to the collective bias of a product team.”

“AI is transforming our society,” she added. “As we become more dependent on a modern digital infrastructure embedded with machine learning, we must understand the foundation of the models and how those models are built. Historical accuracy of individual datasets used to build a product is just as important as modern-day historical output. We cannot understand where we are going if we do not understand where we came from.”

Former Fortune 100 emerging technology executive Sonita Lontoh told Fox News that Digital boards and business leaders need to understand that AI bias exists and has exacerbated class-based and race-based inequities in healthcare and creditworthiness assessments via mortgage approval algorithms in the past.

A class-action lawsuit filed in December claims that the health insurance company Human used the AI model nHPredict to deny medically necessary healthcare for disabled and elderly patients covered under Medicare Advantage.

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A month earlier, another lawsuit alleged that United Healthcare also used the nHPredict model to reject specific claims despite knowing that the tool was faulty and had contradicted physicians’ conclusions.

“Biases infiltrate AI because algorithm is like an opinion. Biases can enter throughout the AI lifecycle — from the framing of the problem the AI is trying to solve, to product design and data collection, to development and testing. As such, risks and controls should occur at each stage of the AI lifecycle,” she told Fox News Digital.

Lontoh, a board member of several NYSE and Nasdaq-listed companies, said board members need a game plan to monitor and institute AI governance that includes collaboration with internal and external experts.

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A publication from the National Institute for Standards in Technology (NIST) examines bias in AI. In the U.S., the Accountability Act requires bias to be addressed in corporate algorithms. Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the E.U. introduced the right to be informed of an algorithm’s output. The Singapore Model AI Governance Framework has a strong focus on internal governance, decision-making, models, operations management and customer relationship management.

“There are many more disparate examples. But algorithms operate across borders; we need global leadership on this. By providing stakeholders and policymakers with a broader perspective and necessary tools, we can stop the bigot in the machine from perpetuating its prejudice,” Masood said.

However, he remains optimistic that humanity can make AI work to its benefit.

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