Fox News 2024-03-15 01:03:28


Nick Saban makes his stance on NIL clear: ‘What we have now is not college football’

Earlier this week in a courtroom, former Alabama head coach Nick Saban reiterated his stance on NIL and how it has had a negative impact on college athletics.

“What we have now is not college football,” the seven-time national champion said last month.

After five decades on football sidelines, it’s all changed, he says.

“All the things I believed in for all these 50 years of coaching no longer exists in college athletics,” Saban said in court Tuesday.

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Saban reiterated with Bret Baier Thursday night that NIL isn’t the reason he retired.

“I didn’t want my age to be a detriment to the University of Alabama, to the football program and the chances of it being successful,” he said.

However, he has been adamant about making changes to NIL.

Last year, Saban was part of an SEC contingent that went to Capitol Hill to discuss NIL, which he says needs regulation.

Saban says he’d like to see the “collective-driven” system replaced with a “revenue-sharing” operation.

“Football and basketball are going to be fine because they’re revenue-producing, but all the non-revenue sports have always been funded by the revenue sports,” Saban told Baier. “We want to continue to be able to do that, so we have to come up with a system that allows us to do that, and people giving all this money to collectives can give it back to the athletic department or the university in some way that would be beneficial to creating opportunities for student-athletes and helping them be successful.

“A guy like [former Bama quarterback] Bryce Young, who had several national commercials, they didn’t come from a collective. They were because he created a brand for himself, which is what name, image and likeness was supposed to be. 

“And I think that should still exist for all players, but not just a pay-for-play system like we have now where whoever raises the most money in their collective can pay the most for the players, which is not a level playing field. I think in any competitive venue, you want to have some guidelines that gives everyone an equal opportunity to have a chance to be successful.”

Saban said the NCAA “can handle” NIL and whatever changes are necessary, but Congress “needs to” add “national legislation.”

“Now, we just have the state legislation — and every state is different — that would protect the NCAA from litigation once we establish guidelines for the future of college athletics. But the litigation is what got us to this point right now,” he said. “We have to have some protection from litigation. I don’t know if it’s antitrust laws or whatever. 

“I’m not versed enough on all that to really make a recommendation. But I know we need some kind of federal standard and guidelines that allows people to enforce their own rules.

GEORGIA’S KIRBY SMART SOUNDS ALARM ON HOW NIL AFFECTS RECRUITING

“You go to college to create value for your future, and I want the quality of life for student-athletes to be the best it can be. And I think they should have a seat at the table. And I think they should share some of the revenue. But I think it needs to be equal across the board so that a school that can afford more can’t create an advantage for themselves just because they have more money to spend. But I’m all for student-athletes. I want student-athletes to have the best quality of life.”

Saban also touched on the latest move for pay-for-play by the Dartmouth men’s basketball players after they voted to unionize in an attempt to become school employees.

While Saban says he is “not anti-union by any stretch of the imagination,” he did address a negative aspect of unionizing.

“I think you make college athletes employees, there are some disadvantages to that. They can be taxed on a lot more things, on the benefits they get right now,” he said. “We pay approximately $93,000 per student-athlete when you take in all the support that they get — whether that’s academic support, food, all the things that go into their scholarship. If they have to pay tax on some of those benefits, that’s not going to be very beneficial to them, and I don’t think that’s something that we want. 

“But you can’t have revenue sharing in college athletics without making college athletes employees, and that’s why I’m so in favor of taking this route. If you’re a music student, and you create a new song, and you do it in class, the university has the legal right to patent, but you can collect money for that without being an employee. 

“What’s the difference for a student-athlete who plays a sport? I just want to replace the collective NIL model with a revenue-sharing NIL model because the sports do create revenue. Everybody can still have name, image and likeness opportunities, which is a good thing for student-athletes.”

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Saban shied away from saying he’s interested in becoming a commissioner for college sports if such a position opened up, but he is “interested in trying to help college athletes and college athletics be successful in the future” and “continue to create opportunities for multiple sports that are non-revenue sports.”

“I think that’s important that we continue to create those kind of opportunities. I’m very committed to that, so how I could do that best, I’m not sure of,” he said. “But I’m certainly committed to trying.”

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Robert Downey Jr. and wife swear by ‘two-week rule’ that keeps their marriage strong

Robert Downey Jr. and his wife Susan have a rule that they find paramount to their successful marriage.

“We do have a two-week rule, which often feels too long, but we don’t go more than two weeks without seeing each other and the family being together,” Susan told People magazine of not being apart for more than 14 days. “Fortunately, we prefer to be a traveling circus when we can be.”

Married for 18 years, the couple are also producing partners at their company, Team Downey.

ROBERT DOWNEY JR. SHARES HEARTFELT POST FOR WIFE SUSAN ON THEIR 17TH ANNIVERSARY: ‘YOU ARE MY BEDROCK’

“You keep the basic rule of two weeks, and then you don’t try and think too far ahead, because so much of what we do is oddly unpredictable,” said Susan.

“You just never know,” she continued. “Someone might get sick, or there might be a shutdown, or this or that. So you just have to have some basic things in place, and then you have to be willing to flow with the rest of it.”

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Susan acknowledges that her schedule is more flexible than Robert’s, which makes her work-life balance less difficult to maintain. “The good news is I’m not in front of the camera, and so as a producer I end up with a little bit more flexibility in terms of location, of where I would need to be,” she shared. 

“I really admire and have a lot of empathy for couples who both have to be in front of the camera, because you get stuck, and you have to make those choices,” she added.

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And they’re not just a unit of two. The couple share two children, son Exton, 12, and daughter Avri, 9. Robert also has a son, Indio, 30, with ex-wife Deborah Falconer

Turning his life around after years of drug abuse and time in jail, the “Oppenheimer” star, who just won his first Academy Award, values his family tremendously. 

“It just gives me, honestly, something to attach my neurosis to that’s positive,” he said of his wife and children.

Judge issues ruling shortly after Trump lawyers argue for dismissal in documents case

U.S. District Court Judge Aileen Cannon on Thursday dismissed former President Trump’s motion to dismiss charges of retaining classified documents on the grounds of “unconstitutional vagueness.” 

This is only one of two motions from Trump’s legal team. The judge has not ruled on the other motion to dismiss based on the Presidential Records Act (PRA). 

Defense attorney Todd Blanche argued earlier that the Trump position is that the PRA gives the president the authority to retain documents he sees fit, and essentially take them home or out of the White House, and if that’s accurate, that alone is “fatal” to Special Counsel Jack Smith’s indictment. 

“Presidents since George Washington have taken material out of the White House,” said Blanche, adding that the PRA was passed in the late ’70s and nothing in the statute says anything about documents with markings or anything that gives the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) the ability to challenge a president’s decision about which documents are personal versus presidential.

Team Trump also points out often that then-President Trump caused these boxes to be moved while he was still president and that this is the first time NARA has challenged a decision made by a president about which documents are personal versus presidential. They claim NARA only took this action because the president in question was Donald Trump.

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Judge Cannon told Blanche, “All that might be right. But I don’t see how it leads to a dismissal of the indictment…Maybe a defense at trial…”

Blanche replied that this was a “proper” avenue for a dismissal because the government must prove that the possession of the documents was unauthorized.

However, Cannon seemed to double down, saying the arguments might have “some force at trial, but it’s hard to see how it gets you to a dismissal.”

The judge at one point remarked that the Trump defense team’s view of the Presidential Records Act would essentially “gut the PRA,” giving presidents the unfettered ability to classify clearly presidential records as personal. 

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Blanche replied that it is up to Congress to change the law. “That’s what’s supposed to happen. DOJ can’t just decide… [what is personal versus presidential],” he said. 

“We don’t have a lot of case law on this because this has never been done before,” added Blanche. “While he was the president he took records, like many presidents… For the first time ever, NARA took a different path and made a criminal referral,” instead of negotiating with the president as had been done in the past.

Cannon at one point said, “Correct… the seizure of a president’s records was seen to be an extraordinary act.”

Blanche pointed out that in the aftermath of the Clinton presidency, “President Clinton hid tapes in his socks and NARA said there’s nothing we can do about that.”

Cannon asked if those tapes contained any classified information. Blanche said no one knows because the tapes were never recovered from President Clinton.

“They can’t have it both ways,” said Blanche. “No effort to investigate whether there was national defense information in President Clinton’s socks,” but still referring the Trump matter to the DOJ for a potential criminal prosecution.

DOJ prosecutor David Harbach told Cannon that the documents seized at Mar-a-Lago “were not personal, nowhere close to that… The only inference is that they were presidential, not personal.”

Harbach also went back to one of Cannon’s questions to the defense: “Our view is that President Trump’s position would completely gut the PRA.”

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Harbach also took pains to stress the independence of Special Counsel Smith’s team: “We are not appendages or puppets of the Biden Administration.”

Pierce Brosnan pleads guilty in Yellowstone case, ordered to pay fine and make donation

Pierce Brosnan pleaded guilty Thursday to stepping off a trail in a thermal area during a visit to Yellowstone National Park on Nov. 1, 2023.

According to The Associated Press, Pierce phoned into the court hearing to enter his plea and hear his fines. 

The actor was fined $500 and instructed to make a $1,000 donation to Yellowstone Forever, a nonprofit organization created to support the national park, by April 1.

Brosnan’s petty offense for violating closures and use limits was dismissed by U.S. Magistrate Judge Stephanie Hambrick on Thursday.

PIERCE BROSNAN HEADING TO COURT AFTER ‘VIOLATING CLOSURES’ AT YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

Brosnan took to Instagram after his guilty plea to share that he considers himself an “environmentalist” who has the “utmost respect for and love of our natural world.”

“However, I made an impulsive mistake – one that I do not take lightly – when entering a thermal area covered in snow in Yellowstone National Park to take a photograph,” Brosnan added. “I did not see a ‘No Trespassing’ sign posted that warned of danger nor did I hike in the immediate area.”

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The actor shared his apologies for “trespassing in this sensitive area.”

“Yellowstone and all our National Parks are to be cared for and preserved for all to enjoy. #StayOnThePath,” Brosnan concluded his message.

Prior to Brosnan’s guilty plea, the actor’s attorney appeared in court on his behalf on Jan. 4 to enter a not guilty plea

His attorney filed a waiver of appearance at arraignment and requested a trial. On Jan. 10, a notice was posted vacating Brosnan’s originally scheduled Jan. 23 hearing.

Brosnan, 70, was cited for “foot travel in all thermal areas and w/in Yellowstone Canyon confined to trails” and “violating closures and use limits,” according to the U.S. District Court of Wyoming docket.

Brosnan’s citations, which were listed as petty offenses, were issued to the “Mrs. Doubtfire” actor on Nov. 1 but not filed in court until Dec. 26, Fox News Digital previously confirmed.

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The rules for Yellowstone National Park’s thermal areas include, “Do not travel through thermal areas after dark.”

They additionally state that “stock are not permitted in thermal areas,” “altering or putting objects in thermal features is prohibited” and “swimming, soaking or bathing in waters that are entirely of thermal origin is prohibited.”

Yellowstone National Park features over 500 active geysers.

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“In thermal areas, the ground may be only a thin crust above boiling hot springs, and there is no way to guess where a safe path is,” the park’s website states.

“New hazards can bubble up overnight, and pools are acidic enough to burn through boots, so you must stay in designated walking areas. The park service has established boardwalks for an easy and safe approach to thermal features.”

A recent incident illustrates just how dangerous the park’s thermal areas can be.

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Federal prosecutors charged a Michigan man with off-trail travel in a Yellowstone National Park thermal area and being under the influence of drugs and alcohol after he sustained thermal burns in August. He has been banned from Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks until the criminal charges are resolved, according to a press release.

Fox News Digital’s Lauryn Overhultz contributed to this report.

Man reveals ancient coins he found under a church 60 years ago while on ‘treasure hunt’

A Norwegian man recently came forward to disclose that he had found several medieval coins as a child and hid them for six decades – until now.

Jan Gunnar Fugelsnes told Møre og Romsdal County Municipality officials that he and his brother were adventuring under the floorboards of Edøy Church in 1964 when he found the coins.

The boys had crawled under the church’s floor, which was hollowed out by Nazi soldiers as a place to store ammunition during World War II. Fugelsnes, who described his underground venture as a “treasure hunt,” brought 14 silver coins home.

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“He packed them neatly in a yellow Kodak slide box, and there they lay until autumn 2023,” the county’s website explained.

Fugelsnes said that he had no idea how old the coins were at the time. Archeologists believe that the coins were from the Middle Ages, according to a press release that was translated to English.

“We were just children on a treasure hunt under the church, we didn’t realize how rare the coins were,” Fugelsnes explained. “In addition, we found three fittings, an amber pearl and nine needles that day.”

“I think the coins may be from the collection that may have merged with the church sometime in the past,” he added. “After all, Edøy Church has burned several times.”

Carl-Fredrik Wahr-Hansen Vemmestad, who serves as a county archaeologist for Møre og Romsdal, said that some of the coins date back to the thirteenth century.

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Some of the coins may have originated from the reign of Magnus VI, who was King of Norway until 1280. A “newer” coin in the collection dates to the reign of Christian I, who ruled Norway from 1450 to 1481.

“The discovery site and the composition of coins and objects suggest that they may originate from a burial mound that was placed under the church floor in the Middle Ages, between approx. 1200-1300,” Vemmestad said.

The needles are believed to be from the 13th century, and may have been part of a corpse’s clothing. The amber bead was likely from a prayer wreath. Vemmestad called the items “incredibly rare.”

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“Elsewhere in Central Norway, there are literally only a handful of such coins that have survived to our time,” Vemmestad said. “The coins give a unique insight into the Middle Ages in Edøy.”

In Norway, any coins that were produced before 1650 are considered government property – unless they were privately owned before 1905. 

As such, Fugelsnes surrendered the coins to the Møre og Romsdal County Municipality, where they will be preserved for years to come.

“We are very happy that Jan Gunnar let us take over these coins, so that they can be preserved in a safe way and secured for the future,” Vemmestad said.

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Fox News Digital reached out to the Møre og Romsdal County Municipality for comment.

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Democrat lawmaker takes heat for ‘incredibly hurtful’ remark about Latinos who back Trump

Rep. Vicente Gonzalez, D-Texas, in an article published this week, compared Latinos who support former President Trump to “Jews for Hitler” as he discussed GOP outreach in the area, and the remark immediately drew accusations of racism from his Republican challenger in the upcoming election.

“For [Republicans] to stay in power, even at the state level, they need to convince at least a percentage, even a small percentage, of Latinos to start voting Republican,” Gonzalez, who represents an area that includes some of the Rio Grande Valley in Texas, told The New Republic. “If not, they will eventually lose elections.

“If they didn’t have that racist, divisive element within their party, they would have a lot of Latinos, but they can’t seem to shake that off. The rhetoric you hear from the Republican Party is shameful and disgraceful for Latinos. And, you know, when you see Latinos for Trump, to me it is like seeing ‘Jews for Hitler,’ almost, you know?”

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Democrats have accused Republicans of embracing racist rhetoric in their platform of securing the border and limiting illegal immigration. But the New Republic article emphasized how Trump could win both Texas and the Rio Grande Valley as he pushes to restore the tougher border security measures seen during his presidency amid a record-setting border crisis.

The remarks from Gonzalez drew an immediate rebuke from both the National Republican Congressional Committee and former Rep. Mayra Flores, who is seeking to unseat Gonzalez in November.

SPEAKER JOHNSON FLOATS STAND-ALONE ISRAEL AID PLAN AFTER SCHUMER’S COMMENTS MADE SITUATION ‘EVEN MORE URGENT’

“Hispanic voters, especially those living in border communities, know that Democrats are failing them on the border, the economy and community safety. Vicente Gonzalez’s comments are insulting, and he should apologize,” NRCC spokeswoman Delanie Bomar said in a statement.

“Vicente Gonzalez’s racist comments are incredibly hurtful to our entire Latino community in the Rio Grande Valley,” Flores told Fox News Digital. “While he continues peddling in hate and division, I’m going to focus on policies that uplift our entire community, including lower costs, a secure border, safer communities and a focus on faith, family and more opportunities in TX-34.”

Reached for comment Thursday, Gonzalez stood by his remarks.

“I’m stating the obvious. Mayra Flores champions President Trump, who was quoted calling hard-working Mexican immigrants rapists and criminals — saying they’re not our friends,” he said. “She threw her lot in with Marjorie Taylor Greene and George Santos instead of with South Texans.”

The controversy comes as the border crisis, which is now into its third year, looks likely to be a top election issue this year.

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President Biden and former President Trump both visited the southern border this month. Biden has renewed calls for the Senate to pass a bipartisan border funding bill that he supports, saying it is needed to fix a broken system. Conservatives have said the bill doesn’t go far enough.

Republicans say Biden has the power to fix the border crisis, including by restoring Trump-era policies, and passed a border bill of their own last year in the House.

Derrick Henry opens up about the team that didn’t call him ‘at all’ during free agency

The Dallas Cowboys lost Tony Pollard in free agency, so one would think they’d try to replace their starting running back.

Several backs were on the market, including Saquon Barkley, Josh Jacobs, D’Andre Swift and Derrick Henry.

Pollard is replacing Henry in Tennessee, so the Cowboys could have essentially completed a swap.

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But Henry was apparently never on Dallas’ radar.

Henry told Mad Dog Sports Radio the Cowboys didn’t call him “at all” during his free agency period.

“I don’t really know what’s going on over there,” he said.

Henry instead signed with the Baltimore Ravens for a two-year, $16 million deal.

“Baltimore was showing the most interest, and it was somewhere I wanted to be, so I’m glad we got it done,” Henry said. “But the Cowboys never called at all.”

Henry wasn’t afraid to admit he was heavily interested in Dallas, though. 

“Of course,” he said, revealing that he had his eyes on them.

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“That’s where I stay in the offseason. I’m at the back end of my career. That’s a great organization. It would have been a great opportunity,” he said. “But I’m thankful I ended up here in Baltimore. Somewhere I wanted to be. They wanted me as well. It’s a perfect match.”

The former Titans running back will now join a team that led the NFL in rushing yards per game with quarterback Lamar Jackson as the main weapon. Jackson, the 2023 NFL MVP, ran for 821 yards and five touchdowns. He also threw for 3,678 yards and 24 touchdowns.

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Henry was a Pro Bowler for the fourth time in his career in 2023. He rushed for 1,167 yards and 12 touchdowns and led the NFL in rushing attempts for the second consecutive season with 280. Henry has led the league in carries four of the last five seasons. He spent most of 2021 out with an injury.

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report.

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Biden-nominated US attorney, once hailed as rising ‘national leader,’ loses law license

Rachael Rollins, the disgraced former U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts nominated by President Biden, has had her law license suspended less than a year after resigning from her position amid a lengthy DOJ investigation, court documents show.

According to Massachusetts Appellate Court records, Rollins — who was paraded as a rising “national leader” after Biden nominated her for U.S. attorney — had her license to practice law in the state suspended effective Feb. 20 due to the nonpayment of registration fees. 

Prior to the DOJ investigation that centered on her alleged unethical misconduct relating to political activities in favor of the Democrat Party, Rollins — the then-Suffolk County district attorney — was praised by liberal media outlets and Democrats in Congress over her approach to crime in the Boston area.

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“Rollins has been among President Biden’s smartest appointments, and if her nomination is finally approved in the Senate she would become the top federal prosecutor in Massachusetts, handling cases involving national security, white-collar crime, public corruption, cybercrime, gang violence and civil rights violations,” the Los Angeles Times’ editorial board wrote as it defended her from Republican criticism at the time.

“Biden’s nomination of Rollins, while hardly radical, represents a threat to the Republican narrative about Democrats and crime, as do Boston’s enviable crime stats … The point is that when GOP senators claim that Rollins’ policies increase crime, they’re just making things up to justify blocking one of the nation’s most successful criminal justice leaders,” it added.

Massachusetts Democratic Sens. Ed Markey and Elizabeth Warren described Rollins as “a great choice for U.S. Attorney,” and that they were “proud to recommend her to the Biden administration.”

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“District Attorney Rollins is a national leader on transforming the criminal justice system and shifting away from an approach based on punishment and penalization to one that combats the root causes of injustice, whether it be poverty, substance use, or racial disparity,” they said in a statement at the time.

“She has prosecutorial experience, and is dedicated and committed to advancing equal justice for all, and we are certain that she will be a tremendous U.S. Attorney. We will work to make sure she is confirmed as quickly as possible,” they added.

Rollins was ultimately confirmed by the Democrat-controlled Senate, but was later found by the DOJ to have unethically attended a partisan Biden fundraiser last summer and “falsely testified under oath” about leaking “sensitive DOJ” information to the press in an effort to help a Democrat win elected office.

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Details of Rollins’ misconduct — highlighted in the DOJ’s report released ahead of her resignation last May by Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s office — showed that Rollins attempted to swing an election by assisting “Ricardo Arroyo with his Democratic primary campaign for Suffolk D.A.”

Rollins, according to the report, went so far as to offer Arroyo advice on how to handle the sexual assault allegations levied against him during his campaign and also provided media outlets with “negative information” about his challenger, Kevin Hayden.

The DOJ also concluded that Rollins “falsely testified under oath during her OIG interview when she denied that she was the federal law enforcement source that provided nonpublic, sensitive DOJ information to the Herald reporter about a possible Hayden criminal investigation.”

Rollins later admitted to being the source after she “produced relevant text messages, which definitively showed that Rollins had indeed been a source for the reporter and had disclosed to him the internal DOJ recusal memorandum quoted in the story,” the report said.

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The report also found that Rollins, despite ethics advice not to, attended a Biden fundraiser the year prior that included an appearance by first lady Jill Biden.

Fox News Digital has reached out to Rollins, Markey, Warren and the Los Angeles Times for comment.

Michigan school shooter’s father convicted of involuntary manslaughter

A Michigan jury on Thursday reached a guilty verdict on four counts of involuntary manslaughter in the trial of James Crumbley, father of school shooter Ethan Crumbley, who faced charges stemming from his teenage son’s decision to open fire on Oxford High School in November 2021.

James Crumbley, 47, and Jennifer Crumbley, 45, were each charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter following the Nov. 30, 2021, shooting during which their then-15-year-old son killed students Tate Myre, 16; Justin Shilling, 16; Hana St. Juliana, 14; and Madisyn Baldwin, 17, and left seven other victims injured.

“This is a historic case,” criminal defense attorney Keith Johnson told Fox News Digital, “because the prosecutors are seeking to hold a parent responsible for the actions of a child … the violent actions that led to the death of other children. And so this is a test case to see the limits of parents’ responsibility for the actions of their children who are of a high school age.”

Johnson added that the trials for James and Jennifer Crumbley “could definitely lead to prosecutors throughout the country taking a similar strategy and holding parents and guardians responsible if weapons are brought to the home and are used in these types of mass-shooting incidents.” The Crumbleys are the first parents in U.S. history to stand trial for a mass school shooting.

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James Crumbley on Wednesday declined to testify during his trial, as his wife did in February during her separate trial. Jennifer was found guilty on all four counts and is set to be sentenced in April. 

Several witnesses who testified during Jennifer’s trial have also testified in James’ trial.

JENNIFER CRUMBLEY TRIAL: MICHIGAN JURY FINDS SCHOOL SHOOTER’S MOM GUILTY OF INVOLUNTARY MANSLAUGHTER

On Wednesday, jurors heard from James Crumbley’s sister, who testified on her brother’s behalf. Karen Crumbley, a Florida mother of four, said she did not feel anything was “wrong” in the Crumbley household when she visited Michigan in the summer of 2021.

“If I would’ve known anything, I would’ve talked to [Ethan], would have [taken] him home with me if there was any kind of inclination that anything was wrong,” Karen said, adding later that there was “nothing” she was “concerned about” as it related to her brother or Ethan.

MICHIGAN SCHOOL SHOOTER’S MOTHER JENNIFER CRUMBLEY CALLED SON AN ‘OOPSIE BABY,’ WITNESS SAYS

Jurors on Tuesday also heard from Oakland County Sheriff’s Office Det. Adam Stoyek, who searched the Crumbleys’ house after the Oxford High School shooting and spoke with James about his firearms. Stoyek also testified during Jennifer’s trial.

Stoyek said he walked through the Crumbleys’ home with James after the shooting. James showed him a .22-caliber Derringer and a .22-caliber KelTec, both of which had locks set to the default code of 0-0-0. 

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Oxford police said Ethan used a 9mm Sig Sauer to shoot up Oxford High School. James purchased the firearm, which contained several rounds of ammunition when authorities recovered it, for his then-15-year-old son just days before the massacre.

It remains unclear how exactly Ethan got access to the gun and brought it to school in his backpack on Nov. 30, 2021, but Stoyek testified that James never mentioned anything about the Sig Sauer being locked prior to the shooting.

“I think the question becomes: what is a parent reasonably supposed to do to secure a firearm or a weapon or let authorities know that their child is having certain thoughts or certain ideations of violence?” Johnson said of how the Crumbley case will set a precedent for other parents. “So, I believe that it must be on a case-by-case basis.”

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Ethan Crumbley pleaded guilty to murder and terrorism last year. He is serving life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Prosecutors have suggested the Crumbleys could have stopped the shooting before it happened when they arrived at Oxford High on the morning of Nov. 30, 2021, to meet with school counselors after Ethan was caught scrawling disturbing notes in class.

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His notes included an image of a gun and the phrases “Help me,” “Blood everywhere” and “My life is useless,” along with a drawing of a gun.

Instead of taking their son home, prosecutors said, James and Jennifer left him at school and went about their day.

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“This case is not about holding James Crumbley responsible for what his son did,” Oakland County prosecutor Karen McDonald said in court on Wednesday. “It’s about his legal duty and his failure to perform it.”

She added later that James “did nothing” when “presented with the easiest, most glaring opportunities to prevent the deaths of four students.”

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Prosecutors have pointed to Ethan’s journal entries, text messages and videos saying he wanted help and his parents were ignoring him. The day before the school massacre, Ethan made a 19-minute video describing what he was going to do the next day, prosecutors said during Jennifer’s trial.

After the shooting, the Crumbleys allegedly fled Oxford and went to Detroit with $6,000 in cash following some initial questioning from police. U.S. Marshals eventually apprehended them days later on Dec. 4, 2021.

James Crumbley is scheduled to be sentenced on April 9 at 9 a.m.