Fox News 2024-03-22 10:03:33


Illegal immigrants storm US border in El Paso, knock over guards amid standoff over law

A large group of illegal immigrants burst through razor wire and surged towards the border wall in El Paso, Texas, on Thursday in a chaotic scene during which guards were knocked over — just as the state’s anti-illegal immigration law is being held up in the courts.

Video taken by the New York Post showed dozens of adult males ripping away razor wire that was set up by the state and charging past Texas National Guardsmen. They then ran towards a section of border wall where they were blocked from entering further. 

A Texas law enforcement source told Fox News the group consisted of over 300 illegal immigrants, and about 100 adult males rushed the soldiers, and one has been arrested so far for assaulting a soldier. The melee began when one family unit was allowed through. The source said that more arrests are likely coming for destruction of property and assault. 

“Get the f— back!” one soldier can be heard in the Post’s video yelling at the illegal immigrants from the other side of the fence.

MIDWEST STATE ON VERGE OF DEFYING BIDEN WITH TEXAS-STYLE BILL TO COMBAT ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION

Brandon Judd, president of the National Border Patrol Council, told Fox News Digital that all migrants are now apprehended, and agents were going through video to see who assaulted the soldiers. They will be processed for deportation, but maintain the ability to claim asylum. Texas also has the ability to charge the migrants who assaulted them.

But it marks the latest flashpoint at the border in a three-year crisis that has seen record numbers of migrants hit the border, with 2.4 million in FY 23 alone. Numbers have dropped since the high of 302,000 seen in December, but there are concerns those numbers could again swell as the summer months approach.

Texas has implemented a number of border security measures to tackle the flow of illegal immigration, most of which have faced opposition from the Biden administration. The razor wire has been cut by federal officials, leading to a lawsuit. Meanwhile, the administration sued over Texas’ deployment of buoys into the Rio Grande.

This week, the Supreme Court briefly allowed Texas’ anti-illegal immigration law, which allows police to arrest illegal immigrants, to go into effect despite a legal challenge from the Biden administration. The law was kicked back down to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, which then blocked it again hours later as arguments proceed on the merits.

The Biden administration has claimed that the law encroaches upon federal responsibility over immigration enforcement. 

TEXAS CAN KEEP ARRESTING ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS WHILE BIDEN CHALLENGE PROCEEDS, ABBOTT SAYS

“S.B. 4 will not only make communities in Texas less safe, it will also burden law enforcement, and sow chaos and confusion at our southern border. S.B. 4 is just another example of Republican officials politicizing the border while blocking real solutions, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said in a statement this week.

Texas has argued that it has had to act because the administration is not doing its job to secure the border and deport those in the country illegally.

MEXICO SLAMS TEXAS OVER IMMIGRATION LAW, WON’T ACCEPT REPATRIATIONS FROM STATE AFTER SCOTUS RULING

“Number one, we are facing such dangerous situations. And number two, Joe Biden, through his actions, is violating the laws of the United States of America,” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said Wednesday.

Texas has said it still has the authority to stop those coming across illegally by using trespass laws. Gov. Abbott’s spokesman, Andrew Mahaleris, told Fox News Digital, “The surge today in El Paso is the direct result of the unsustainable chaos President Biden has unleashed on the border. The Texas Military Department and the Texas Department of Public Safety quickly gained control of the situation and are working to repair the damage. These illegal immigrants committed crimes in Texas, and the Department of Public Safety is under instruction to arrest every illegal immigrant involved for committing criminal trespass and destruction of property.”

Meanwhile, the chaotic scenes at the border will fuel the ongoing debate in Washington, D.C., over how to handle the crisis. The Biden administration has said it needs more funding, resources and reforms to overhaul a “broken” system and has called for passage of a bipartisan Senate package.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Republicans have said no such legislation is needed and that the administration can restore calm by re-enacting Trump-era policies like “Remain-in-Mexico” and wall construction.

“Just in case people are unsure, this is what an invasion looks like,” Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., said Thursday.

Handyman issues urgent warning for innocent house hunters

Home buyers and tenants need to be on guard against housing scams that could inadvertently turn them into trespassers, a handyman-turned-squatter hunter warned.

“Just because you were scammed doesn’t mean that this homeowner should suffer,” Flash Shelton, founder of the United Handyman Association and SquatterHunters.com, said. “Just like if you received a stolen car, that car is gonna be taken away from you.”

HANDYMAN-TURNED-SQUATTER HUNTER OUTLINES ‘NIGHTMARE SCENARIO’ WHEN MIGRANTS CATCH ON TO HOUSING LAWS

Shelton rose to international prominence last year after posting a video about how he turned the tables on squatters who had moved into his mother’s house in California while it was up for sale. People from all around the world now seek his advice or even hire him to get rid of squatters.

While some squatters appear to be gaming the system, claiming to have signed a lease on properties they broke into — like in the case of a Pennsylvania man who ultimately paid squatters $1,200 to leave his house — others start out as well-meaning individuals ensnared by rental scams online, Shelton said.

‘OH MY GOD’: SINGLE MOM RETURNS HOME FROM WORK TO FIND DRIVEWAY STOLEN. ‘NOW I’M LEFT WITH DIRT’

The owner of a Philadelphia property management company told Fox News last spring that scammers would copy listings from their website or Zillow, post it somewhere like Craigslist at a lower price and request a deposit through a cash app.

When the prospective tenant shows up at the property, the scammer tells them they lost the key and to “just go ahead and get a locksmith,” Anchor Realty NE owner Walter Lapidus told Fox News. “Either that or they actually go and replace the locks when the house is for rent and hope to get it rented before we have our next showing.”

‘SORRY YOU GOT SCAMMED’: HANDYMAN’S WARNING FOR ACCIDENTAL SQUATTERS:

WATCH MORE FOX NEWS DIGITAL ORIGINALS HERE

“Those are very common in Philadelphia and probably some of the other locations where I guess these people know that the city is valuing their rights above those of a homeowner or a tenant,” Lapidus added.

Squatting laws — and the procedures for removing illegal occupants — vary across the country. In states where laws prevent police from intervening, homeowners and landlords are at the mercy of civil processes to reclaim their property, which can take months, even years. 

“I wouldn’t sign anything until I’ve met with a leasing agent, somebody physically, and get their information, get their card,” Shelton cautioned. “I would absolutely just check all my boxes and make sure that everything seems right.”

But Shelton’s sympathy for accidental squatters is limited.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“I wouldn’t lease a property without knowing who owns the property,” he said. “If you happen to be scammed, I’m sorry you got scammed, but that house still should be taken from you.”

Click here to hear more from Shelton.

Teen receives patriotic surprise after high school bans Old Glory display

High school student Cameron Blasek received a patriotic paintjob free of charge for his pickup truck after East Central High School administrators in St. Leon, Indiana attempted to stop him from displaying the American flag earlier this month.

Blasek, 17, proudly displayed an American flag on his truck for most of his senior year, but Blasek said school administrators told him it broke school rules and needed to be removed.

Blasek, in an interview with Fox News Digital, said of his high school’s crackdown: “I was shocked. Didn’t really expect it.”

FDNY BROTHERS WHO DIED ON 9/11 SAVING PEOPLE IN BOTH TOWERS HONORED AT ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

“They had told me if you don’t remove this flag, you’re getting written up for insubordination. And I told them, hey, you know, there’s no rules or regulations saying I can’t, I read the [rules] off their handbook.”

Soon afterward, other students arrived at school flying American flags on their cars, and the news story went viral.

Cameron added, “I guess other students had heard about that and they showed up the next day with flags on the back of their vehicles.”

AMERICAN VALUES: WHAT SMALL TOWN AMERICA IS SAYING ABOUT THE AMERICAN DREAM, ‘GETTING TOO HARD’

GCI Digital, a business based out of nearby Cincinnati, heard about Cameron Blasek’s patriotic story and decided to spring into action. 

The business gifted a brand-new custom American flag wrap to the high school senior, free of charge.

TJ Bedacht, owner of the local business, shared in a statement with Fox News Digital, “We saw Cameron’s story and it resonated with us in a lot of ways. The truck was his grandfather’s and Cameron is a true American, interested in serving in the US Military.”

Blasek is already a fan of his new red, white and blue addition. 

“I love it. It’s only been one day at school so far, but, I think it’s great. I love driving around with the big flag all over the vehicle. I think it’s awesome.”

Seventeen-year-old Blasek believes the American flag represents “a lot of things.”

“I think the American flag represents people who fought and served for this country and lost their lives. But I also think it represents a sense of unity in this country.”

“I think the American flag represents people who fought and served for this country and lost their lives.”

— Indiana high school student Cameron Blasek

“I think it’s something that everybody can agree on, no matter who you are or where you come from or what you look like. I think that’s something that can bring people together.”

Blasek believes that there is an important lesson to be learned from his experience.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Stand for what you believe in. Hold your ground on any situation that you believe in.”

Principal Tom Black told Fox News Digital that the rule “was never about the U.S. flag and it was regarding all flags on vehicles.” 

“This is due to potential safety issues with visibility and 500-600 teenage drivers leaving at the same time during dismissal, as well as concerns that flags that are not appropriate for school will be displayed.” 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

After consultation with the Superintendent, however, Black determined the school could allow the U.S. flag while still restricting other flags. 

“We regret and are sorry for the confusion and are working diligently to clarify the issue with our community,” Black said. 

Fox News Digital’s Jeffrey Clark contributed to this story.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit foxnews.com/lifestyle.

Democrat caught on camera using racial slur forced to apologize

The Democrat frontrunner in what could be one of the most closely watched Senate races this year uttered a racial slur during a Thursday House Budget Committee hearing, something he says was unintentional. 

Rep. David Trone, D-Md., dropped the disparaging term for Black people while speaking during the hearing about tax policy with Shalanda Young, the director of the Office of Budget and Management, who was testifying before the committee.

“So this Republican jigaboo that — it’s the tax rate that’s stopping business investment, it’s just completely faulty by people who have never run a business,” he said. “They’ve never been there. They don’t have a clue what they’re talking about.”

TOP DEMOCRAT IN TIGHT SENATE RACE BACKS CITIZENSHIP VOTING RIGHTS FOR MILLIONS OF ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

When reached for comment, Trone admitted to Fox News Digital he used the term, but said he misspoke while meaning to use a different word.

“Today while attempting to use the word ‘bugaboo’ in a hearing, I used a phrase that is offensive. That word has a long dark terrible history. It should never be used any time, anywhere, in any conversation,” Trone said.

“I recognize that as a White man, I have privilege. And as an elected official, I have a responsibility for the words I use — especially in the heat of the moment. Regardless of what I meant to say, I shouldn’t have used that language,” he added.

HILLARY CLINTON WADES INTO CRUCIAL BATTLEGROUND SENATE RACE THAT COULD DETERMINE BALANCE OF POWER

Earlier this week, Trone faced heat for other comments he made at a candidate forum earlier this month in which he declared his support for granting citizenship and voting rights to the millions of illegal immigrants residing in the U.S.

He holds a fundraising and polling advantage among a crowded Democrat primary field. His closest challenger is Prince George’s County Executive Angela Alsobrooks, who is Black.

Fox News Digital has reached out to Alsobrooks for comment.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He will likely face Maryland’s former Republican governor, Larry Hogan, in the general election. Early polls suggested a tight race between the two. However, a Washington Post/University of Maryland poll released Wednesday showed Hogan with a double-digit lead.

Elections analysts rate the race as “likely” Democrat, but Hogan’s name recognition and high approval rating at the conclusion of his second term last year could further pose a challenge to Democrats’ hopes of maintaining control of the Senate.

Get the latest updates from the 2024 campaign trail, exclusive interviews and more at our Fox News Digital election hub.

Biden admin quietly tying massive semiconductor push to DEI initiatives

The highly touted bipartisan CHIPS and Science Act, one of the top legislative victories of President Biden’s tenure, is quietly tied to a number of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) initiatives that critics argue contravene the law’s objectives.

The legislation, which Biden signed in August 2022, is designed to shore up U.S. semiconductor supply chains, earmarking $52.7 billion to establish the CHIPS for America Fund, which supports private-sector investment in domestic research and manufacturing. However, according to a review of federal filings, the funding is contingent on applicants meeting a series of DEI requirements.

“If you look through the notice of funding opportunity, which is the Commerce Department’s requirements in order to get funding, there’s literally the word diversity, equity and inclusion and DEI requirements littered throughout,” said Chris Nicholson, head of research at the firm Strive Asset Management. Strive, which was founded by former presidential hopeful Vivek Ramaswamy, has more than $1 billion in assets.

“Although this money is announced in some sense, it’s not even going to be given,” said Nicholson, who has researched the semiconductor industry. “That’s the key here. It’s not even going to be given unless [funding recipients], step by step, they meet, and they prove they’re meeting all of these DEI requirements.”

VIRGINIA GOV YOUNGKIN VETOES DEM BILL FORCING DIVERSITY DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ON BUSINESSES

Months after Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act into law, the Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) issued its first funding opportunity for companies seeking to develop semiconductor projects. NIST Director Laurie Locascio said at the time that funding decisions would be targeted to “maximize the impact of every public dollar spent.”

However, the funding opportunity has a lengthy list of DEI requirements that would force semiconductor makers to, for example, “develop an equity strategy” that describes “specific efforts to … promote diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility.”

MOTHER WHO PULLED KIDS FROM PUBLIC SCHOOL OVER WOKE CURRICULUM SAYS HOME-SCHOOLING PRODUCES ‘AMAZING’ RESULTS

This week, Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., who chairs the House Anti-Woke Caucus, circulated a memo first obtained by Fox News Digital, highlighting the requirements. In the memo, he blasted the Biden administration for prioritizing DEI, arguing it would discourage foreign investment in the U.S. and had already contributed to project delays.

“Attempting to make America stronger and more prosperous, but also more woke, is self-defeating,” Banks told Fox News Digital in a statement. “A woker America is a weaker America.”

According to Banks’ memo, applicants for CHIPS for America funding must have a plan to employ ex-convicts, expand employment opportunities for people with “limited English proficiency,” hire more women for construction jobs, and produce a plan for contracting “diverse suppliers” that are women- and minority-owned.

In addition, applicants for large grants must guarantee “affordable, accessible, reliable, and high quality” child care for all workers, including all construction workers, allowing CHIPS and Science Act funding to be used for child care center construction.

JORDAN SAYS CUTS TO MILITARY SPENDING SHOULD BE ‘ON THE TABLE’ AS MONEY SHOULD NOT GO TO ‘WOKE’ POLICIES

And the Department of Commerce’s funding notice mandates applicants submit a climate and environmental justice plan accounting for “climate-related risks that may occur over the lifetime of the facility” while giving preference to applicants whose operations are operated by 100% green energy.

“All you have to do is look at the nature of the requirements themselves, and you can see that they’re an enormous roadblock,” Nicholson told Fox News Digital.

He noted that the requirement to hire diverse suppliers could be playing a significant role in delaying proposed semiconductor projects nationwide. Nicholson added that another funding provision strongly encouraging applicants to employ union labor is also likely to add considerable costs to manufacturers.

Last year, South Korea’s then-minister of trade, industry and energy, Lee Chang-yang, expressed concern about “conditions attached to the act,” specifically noting the Biden administration’s child care requirements, and added that investing in the U.S. semiconductor supply chain is “becoming less appealing,” Korean Economic Daily reported at the time.

In a statement to Fox News Digital, the White House blasted Banks’ memo and said the CHIPS and Science Act was doing its job of attracting new investment in America.

EXECS PLAN TO INVEST MORE IN AI THIS YEAR BUT IMPLEMENTATION BARRIERS REMAIN

“Thanks to President Biden’s Investing in America agenda, companies from across the world are investing billions of dollars building factories across the country and training veterans, people from rural communities, and Americans from all walks of life for the well-paying jobs they’ll provide,” White House spokesperson Robyn Patterson wrote.

“Shovels are in ground, facilities are already under construction, and Americans are already feeling the benefits of this President’s economic agenda. It’s sad that Congressman Jim Banks joined the CCP in opposing the landmark CHIPS and Science Act helping to keep manufacturing jobs here at home.”

Since Biden signed the legislation, the federal government has announced multiple nonbinding preliminary agreements with semiconductor industry players worth billions of dollars. The most recent such agreement — $8.5 billion in potential direct funding for several projects being developed by California-based tech firm Intel — was announced Wednesday.

INTEL EMBARKING ON ‘JOURNEY TO REBUILD’ US CHIP DOMINATION, CEO SAYS

But some of the ambitious plans to build semiconductor production in the U.S. have faced significant delays. Last month, Intel abruptly halted construction of its $20 billion Ohio plant, and this week, five suppliers delayed construction of facilities in Arizona aimed at supporting plants being developed by Intel and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC).

Intel declined to say if the Biden administration’s requirements were delaying any of its plans but said it was “positioned to meet its obligations.”

“We are grateful for the support from the Biden Administration, the Department of Commerce, and the entire U.S. government in our shared mission to strengthen the nation’s semiconductor industry,” Intel spokesperson William Moss told Fox News Digital. “Intel is well positioned to meet its obligations and will judiciously adhere to all reporting requirements and milestones set forth by the Department of Commerce.”

“Wafer fabrication sites typically require three to five years from groundbreaking to production, subject to business conditions and other factors,” he added.

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

TSMC did not respond to a request for comment.

Overall, semiconductors are vital for supporting a wide range of communications, science, medical and energy technologies. But China currently dominates the global supply chain, accounting for an estimated 31.4% of worldwide final sales, according to Citigroup research.

Woman announces her own death on social media in heartbreaking final post

A young woman who died from a rare form of cancer is posthumously going viral on social media after her final and poignant message was shared with the world online.

“If you’re reading this then it means I have died from my battle with cancer,” Daniella Thackray’s post says, adding that her family shared the message on her behalf. 

“Firstly, I just want to say that not all cancers are caused by lifestyle choices. In some cases it’s genetics or unfortunately it just happens. In my case, despite me being very healthy and active, a cancer started in my bile ducts, which was not caused by anything in my control and my life was never the same again.”

KENTUCKY MAN’S ‘SECOND FAVORITE SON’ PENS FUNNY OBITUARY FOR DAD: ‘HE WILL BE MODERATELY MISSED’

Thackray, who was reportedly in her 20s, lost her life after fighting cholangiocarinoma.

It’s a rare and aggressive cancer, which has no cure, she wrote in her message.

Cholangiocarinoma is a bile duct cancer that typically occurs in people older than age 50. But it can also occur at any age, as the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota notes on its “Diseases & Conditions” webpage. 

People are often diagnosed when the cancer has advanced, which makes treatment “difficult to achieve,” according to the organization.

“I really really do hope that in the years to come more research is done about this horrid, cruel disease so that more lives can be saved,” Thackray wrote.

“So with that being said, although we can’t control what happens to us, we can control how we react. I chose not to mourn the life I was losing despite being so devastated, but to instead enjoy every moment I had left.”

UTAH TEEN RECEIVES ‘DREAM CAR,’ FORD RACING TRIP AFTER LEARNING RARE CANCER DIAGNOSIS HAS SPREAD TO HIS LUNGS

“As I have always said and believed, you should enjoy the little things in life and cherish every moment!” she also wrote. “Romanticise your life! Do whatever makes you happy and don’t let anyone take the joy of life away from you…”

She continued, “I LOVED my life. Everything I had achieved was what I wanted. I loved my job, my fiancé, my family, my friends and my dog, and the house we were going to buy and the future we were making for ourselves. Leo my fur baby was definitely brought into my life to help brighten my darkest days.”

“So thank you everyone for making my life so magical,” Thackray also wrote. 

“Remember what I said about enjoying the little things.”

Thackray worked as an HR professional in Leeds, England, according to her LinkedIn profile. 

She earned a bachelor of arts degree from Newcastle University in Tyne, England. Her final post was publicly shared on Facebook and LinkedIn last month.

OHIO NURSE AND MOM BEATS CERVICAL CANCER AS EXPERT SHARES WARNING SIGNS YOU SHOULD NEVER IGNORE

Friends, family and colleagues commented on both platforms, expressing their profound grief while also eulogizing Thackray.

“Daniella, you were a beautiful lady, inside and out,” one woman wrote underneath the post on Thackray’s Facebook page. “I loved working with you at Primark years ago. You brightened up the weekend! I’m so sorry this happened to you. My heart breaks for you and your loved ones. Rest in eternal peace.”

“Rest in peace Daniella, you were such a kind-hearted, lovely person,” another said.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

“RIP, angel,” another person wrote, adding a heart emoji. “You brought joy to my life, always helped me and we always had a laugh! Ride high, you absolute queen.”

“Rest in peace Daniella, from the rest of the Thackray family,” a family member commented.

Fox News Digital reached out to friends and a family member of Thackray’s for comment.

“A selfless gift of wisdom and perspective was her final wish. It speaks volumes of her character and our collective loss,” a LinkedIn user commented on Thackray’s post.

“I’m so sorry you had to leave so soon, Daniella,” the comment continued. “I’m so sorry your parents had to watch their child die. I’m so sorry Tom didn’t get to marry the love of his life. Rest well, beautiful Angel.”

Thackray concluded her final post with a quote that she credited to Winnie the Pooh, while also mentioning her fiancé, Tom.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“If ever there is a tomorrow when we’re not together, there is something you must always remember. You are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem and smarter than you think. But the most important thing is, even if we’re apart … I’ll always be with you.” — Winnie the Pooh

“Rest well, beautiful Angel.” — LinkedIn comment 

“And lastly, to my dear, beautiful Tom, I love you and always will. Thank you for supporting me and bringing so much love and happiness into my life. Go enjoy your life now, you deserve it.”

Thackray’s post garnered more than 53,000 likes on LinkedIn and 3,500 reactions on Facebook at the time of publication. 

Multiple news outlets have written about the story across the globe since her family shared it on Feb. 23 on her social accounts.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit foxnews.com/lifestyle.

Mark Cuban makes it clear who he’s supporting in race for the White House

Billionaire Mark Cuban attended a fundraiser for President Biden this week, saying Biden now has his support in the 2024 presidential election.

The “Shark Tank” entrepreneur made an appearance at a Dallas fundraiser on Wednesday night held in the backyard of a private residence.

Cuban told ABC News he “wanted to show [his] support and say hi to the president.”

MARK CUBAN IS ‘INDIFFERENT’ TO WHAT BIDEN REPRESENTS TO EVERYDAY AMERICANS, FAILLA SAYS: ‘SHAME’ ON HIM

Cuban previously voted for Republican candidate Nikki Haley, the former governor of South Carolina and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, in the Texas GOP primary.

Since Haley suspended her campaign earlier this month, the business mogul has been open about his preference for Biden over former President Trump, who is the presumptive GOP nominee for 2024.

“Let me ask you — does anyone here want to go back to 2020? When fear ruled our lives and Trump was president? I don’t think so,” Biden asked at the fundraiser, according to the ABC report.

MARK CUBAN WILL TEACH AN ONLINE CLASS: HERE’S AN INSIDE LOOK

The Dallas Mavericks minority owner and media personality spoke to Bloomberg News about the presidential election after he visited the White House earlier this month to take part in a roundtable discussion on controlling drug prices.

Despite ongoing and growing concerns over Biden’s age, Cuban shrugged off the issue, claiming he would vote for the president even on his deathbed.

“If they were having his last wake, and it was him versus Trump, and he was being given last rites, I would still vote for Joe Biden,” Cuban emphasized.

GET FOX BUSINESS ON THE GO BY CLICKING HERE

Cuban previously voiced his support for Biden in 2020 while appearing on “Hannity.”

“Donald Trump doesn’t want to run a country. He wants to run a campaign,” Cuban told Sean Hannity. “Joe Biden actually wants to run a country.”

FOX Business reached out to Cuban for comment.

FOX Business’ Lindsay Kornick contributed to this report.

Bon Jovi leads music icons pushing health limits to keep touring across the globe

Rockers are dedicated to their fans, but sometimes that dedication pushes them to their limits and impacts their health. Over the past year, several major acts have had to postpone their tours to address serious health issues.

Bruce Springsteen returned to the stage this week after suffering from a peptic ulcer last year.

The tour kicked off in Phoenix on March 19. According to the Associated Press, the “Born in the USA” singer addressed the crowd by saying, “Phoenix, first I want to apologize if there was any discomfort because we had to move the show last time. … I hope we didn’t inconvenience you too much.”

He went on to play a nearly three-hour show, showcasing his voice, dancing and even ripping his shirt open near the end of the show, per the AP.

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN SHARES ENORMITY OF PAIN HE’S IN SINCE POSTPONING TOUR

Rob Weiner, a pop culture librarian at Texas Tech University, has a simple explanation for what drives performers like Springsteen, Bon Jovi, the Rolling Stones and more to stay on the road.

“Music is their lives. It is what they do. Dying a slow death at home is not very appealing to most musicians,” he told Fox News Digital. 

Weiner continued, “There is nothing that says you have to stop touring at any age. It’s what keeps them young in spirit. Artists create and want to keep doing it, and as long as audiences continue to show up, they try to keep going as long as they can.”

Marc Myers, a Wall Street Journal music and arts contributor, noted there’s also a financial element at stake for many stars.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR THE ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

“Many classic rock artists and acts have to tour,” he told Fox News Digital. “A good number have high bills related to multiple spouses and homes and to cover health care costs. Albums no longer earn money since music is given away on streaming platforms.”

“In addition, much classic rock is out of sync with contemporary pop. As a result, most classic rockers can’t fill large venues, which means they have to take on large numbers of smaller ones to earn what they need. Those that can are selling their catalogs, but some of these lucrative deals compel them to tour and to sustain visibility and keep catalog hits alive.”

Here’s a look at stars who’ve recently faced health issues but pushed through to deliver music to their fans.

FOREIGNER, STYX LEAD NOSTALGIA CONCERT WAVE, SHUTTING DOWN CLAIMS CLASSIC ROCK IS DEAD: ‘THAT IS NOT TRUE’

Bon Jovi

Springsteen’s fellow New Jersey-born rocker, Jon Bon Jovi, has a new album on the way, but his health is currently holding him back from touring.

Bon Jovi spoke with Boston’s Mix 104.1 radio station this month, saying, “I don’t know about a tour. It is my desire to do a tour next year, but I’m just still recovering from a major surgery.”

The “Livin’ on a Prayer” singer spoke in more detail about his surgery during Hulu’s panel for the new docuseries “Thank You, Good Night: The Bon Jovi Story” at the Television Critics Association in February.

According to People, he revealed that one of his vocal cords was “atrophying.”

“So, the strong one was pushing the weak one aside, and I wasn’t singing well,” said Bon Jovi, who described one vocal cord being “thick as the thumb” and the other being “thick as a pinkie.” He added, “My craft was being taken from me.”

JON BON JOVI, RICHIE SAMBORA ARE STILL ‘NOT IN CONTACT’ 11 YEARS AFTER SPLIT

“But nonetheless, and I say in the film and in the latter episodes, if I just had my tools back, the rest of it I can deal with,” he said. “I can write you a song, I can perform as well as anybody. But I need to get my tools back.”

Bon Jovi performed for the first time post-surgery at his MusiCares Person of the Year honor and tribute concert in February.

“I’m obviously humbled just to be here and most proud of our being here 40 years on … still about to release our 18th album,” he told Fox News Digital at the event. “We’re very excited about that. The documentary, everything to celebrate this 40th.”

BON JOVI: A LOOK AT ICONIC ROCK BAND THEN AND NOW

Aerosmith

Aerosmith’s farewell tour, dubbed The Peace Out Tour, kicked off in 2023 but has been postponed until later this year due to lead singer Steven Tyler’s medical issues.

The tour kicked off in September, but Tyler faced a fractured larynx shortly into the run, which forced the band to indefinitely postpone the shows.  

In February, Tyler gave an update on his health while hosting his 5th annual Jam for Janie Grammys viewing party, benefiting his Janie’s Fund nonprofit.

“My throat’s been better, but it is on the mend,” he told attendees of the party, per People.

EAGLES, STEELY DAN TEAMED UP FOR FAREWELL TOUR BEGINNING IN 2023 BUT HAVE FACED SERIOUS HARDSHIP, TRAGIC LOSS

His daughter, Mia Tyler, told People that while her father is “much better,” he doesn’t always follow doctors’ orders.

“He’s not supposed to be talking sometimes, so I have to literally yell at him and be like, ‘You can’t be on the phone with me right now, let’s just text,'” she said, adding that he talks to his phone instead of typing.

“You can’t shut him up, he can’t close that mouth,” she joked, adding that he is “very healthy.”

STEVEN TYLER POSTPONES AEROSMITH SHOWS: FRONTMAN FACES YEARS OF INJURY, REHAB, SEXUAL ASSAULT ACCUSATIONS

Tyler’s bandmate, Joe Perry, told the Boston Globe in late December 2023 that the band was “bummed” to miss their New Year’s Eve show, adding, “[B]ut with any luck, we will be back out late summer and fall of ’24.”

Weiner noted, “Aerosmith’s songs take a lot of energy to sing night after night. Tyler’s vocal style has never been easy.”

“It is important for singers like Steven Tyler and Steve Perry to take care of their throat, as it is what keeps them in money,” he said.

He also pointed to fans appreciating bands’ and performers’ dedication to performing.

“There are always naysayers who think these legacy acts should give it up. But people keep going to see these acts whose best work and performance ability is far behind them,” he said, adding, “Everybody has had health issues, so I do think audiences can be forgiving (not always though, especially when tickets are already bought).”

AEROSMITH’S STEVEN TYLER LATEST FAMOUS SINGER FACING POTENTIALLY CAREER-ENDING VOICE PROBLEMS

The Eagles and Steely Dan

The Eagles and Steely Dan teamed up for a farewell tour beginning in 2023 but have faced serious hardship and a tragic loss.

In March, Steely Dan keyboardist Jim Beard died after an illness. He had been a member of the band since 2008 and last performed with them on Jan. 20 in Phoenix.

Along with being a keyboardist, Beard was also a pianist, composer, producer and arranger.

As of now, both bands still have tour dates listed for the end of May in the U.K. The Eagles are also performing a Jimmy Buffett tribute show at the Hollywood Bowl in April.

Steely Dan also ran into issues early in their tour in October 2023 due to the hospitalization of frontman Donald Fagen. According to the Indianapolis star, Don Henley said onstage that Fagen was in the hospital but “the show must go on.”

LIKE WHAT YOU’RE READING? CLICK HERE FOR MORE ENTERTAINMENT NEWS

Fagen was released shortly after his stay and the tour continued.

Weiner explained that “the show must go on” mentality isn’t meant to be cold or callous on either band’s part.

“Some of these legacy acts have no original members but often have longstanding members who have been with the act for many years. Steely Dan was more of a studio band, and the general public did not know who they were. They just liked the songs. The show always has to go on, and in Steely Dan’s case, I doubt the public will notice too much, except for the hardcore fans,” he said.

He added, “Oftentimes, musical artists have to add some ‘newer’ players to their lineup to keep things fresh and on track. So many legacy acts have only one or two original members, but people still want to hear the music.”

He cited examples like Killer Queen, which has replaced the late Freddie Mercury with Adam Lambert, or U2, which replaced founding member Larry Mullen due to his ongoing health issues.

EAGLES CO-FOUNDER DON HENLEY ‘VICTIMIZED’ BY ‘HOTEL CALIFORNIA’ TRIAL DISMISSAL: LAWYER

The Rolling Stones

The Rolling Stones announced their latest tour, for their 18th album, “Hackney Diamonds,” last year, sponsored by AARP, the organization “dedicated to empowering Americans 50 and older to choose how they live as they age.”

The band will play in 16 cities across the U.S. and Canada, and AARP members will have access to a special pre-sale. The tour kicks off in April in Houston​ and wraps up in July in Santa Clara, California.

Last year, in an interview with the BBC, Richards admitted that he’s had to change his approach to playing guitar after more than 60 years with the band, in part due to having arthritis.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“Funnily enough, I’ve no doubt it has, but I don’t have any pain, it’s a sort of benign version,” Richards said. “I think if I’ve slowed down a little bit, it’s probably due more to age.”

“And also, I found that interesting when I’m like, ‘I can’t quite do that anymore,’ the guitar will show me there’s another way of doing it. Some finger will go one space different, and a whole new door opens,” he continued.

“Keith Richards has also said he would be ‘rocking in his wheelchair.’ It is what artists do,” Weiner said.

“Musicians are a unique breed. They often just keep going and going. They don’t or can’t do anything else. There is something that drives them beyond retirement age.”

Underwater researchers make ancient discovery dating back to 3000 BC

European researchers recently discovered several ancient shipwrecks in Greek waters, some of which date back thousands of years. 

The shipwrecks were discovered in the waters surrounding the island of Kasos, the Greek Ministry of Culture, a government department that preserves the country’s cultural heritage and promotes the arts, announced on March 13. The survey was completed in October 2023.

In a press release translated from Greek to English, officials said that “a total of ten shipwrecks were discovered, as well as important individual finds.”

MAN REVEALS ANCIENT COINS HE FOUND UNDER A CHURCH 60 YEARS AGO: ‘JUST CHILDREN ON A TREASURE HUNT’

The oldest sunken shipwrecks at the site date back to 3000 B.C., and the latest are from World War II. Shipwrecks from the Classical period (460 B.C.), Hellenistic Greece (100 B.C. to 100 A.D.) and Roman Greece (200 B.C. to 300 A.D.) were also found.

Researchers also found wrecks and artifacts from the medieval period and the time of the Ottoman Empire. Researchers dove as deep as 154 feet to examine the wrecks.

“[The study of the artifacts] offers new information and archaeological data [about] aspects of the history of Kasos as well as the rich cultural heritage of the Mediterranean,” the Greek Ministry of Culture said.

“Sunken remains of ancient ships with goods from Spain, Italy, Africa and the coasts of Asia Minor were brought to light by an interdisciplinary team of Greek and foreign researchers and professors.”

ANCIENT TOMB FILLED WITH GOLD, SACRIFICIAL VICTIMS UNCOVERED BY ARCHAEOLOGISTS: ‘SPECIAL TYPE OF BURIAL’

Using tech equipment, researchers snapped over 20,000 underwater photographs, which were used to study the findings.

“[The study] brought to light unique finds, including: a Spanish Dressel 20 amphora with a seal on its handle dated between 150-170 AD,” the press release said. Amphoras were vessels used to carry liquid, such as olive oil. 

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR LIFESTYLE NEWSLETTER

Researchers also found African-made drinking vessels and bottles from the Roman Greece period, along with a stone anchor from the Greek Archaic Period (800 B.C. to 480 B.C.)

“At the same time, the mapping and bathymetry of the Kasos-Karpathos reef and the Karpatholimnion area was carried out for the first time, with the use of a side scanning sonar machine,” the Greek Ministry of Culture’s release said.

“Finally, the remains of a shipwreck from the latest period, possibly from the World War II era, were identified. It is a wooden boat with metal elements, the size of which is estimated at 25 [meters] to 30 [meters].”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Fox News Digital reached out to the Greek Ministry of Culture and the Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities for more information.

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.