Fox News 2024-03-23 16:03:51


Gov signs bill banning gender-reassignment surgeries on children

Wyoming’s Republican Governor Mark Gordon signed into legislation Friday a bill outlawing gender-reassignment procedures on children and vetoed a bill that would have imposed further restrictions on abortion clinics, including required licensure. 

SF0099, also titled “Children gender change prohibition,” prohibits physicians from performing gender-reassignment procedures on children and administering related medications. The legislation specifically banned “a surgery that sterilizes the child, including castration, vasectomy, hysterectomy, oophorectomy, metoidioplasty, orchiectomy, penectomy, phalloplasty and vaginoplasty.” 

The legislation continued on to specify that outlawed medications under the legislation included “any of the following prescription drugs that induce transient or permanent infertility,” proceeded by a list of medications, including “puberty suppression or blocking prescription drugs to stop or delay normal puberty.”

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The bill also outlined various procedures that were exempt from the legislation, such as procedures or treatments performed on a child as a result of “a medically verifiable genetic disorder of sex development.” The legislation specified that parental/guardian consent was required. 

“I signed SF99 because I support the protections this bill includes for children, however, it is my belief that the government is straying into the personal affairs of families” Gordon said in a statement released. “Our legislature needs to sort out its intentions with regard to parental rights. While it inserts governmental prerogative in some places, it affirms parental rights in others.”

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Gordon also vetoed HB0148, known as “Regulation of abortions,” that would have placed additional restrictions on abortion clinics in the state. The press release noted that the bill would have “properly regulated surgical abortion clinics in Wyoming,” but “amendments to the bill complicated its purpose, making it vulnerable to legal challenges.”

The legislation would have required a surgical abortion facility in the state to be licensed as “an ambulatory surgical center,” and a facility conducting the procedures would need a separate license as well. 

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“It is my opinion that HB148, as amended, had the potential to further delay the resolution of this critical issue for the unborn,” Gordon said in the statement. “The potential of starting over on a new course of legal arguments would in my mind be derelict, and would have only sacrificed additional unborn lives in Wyoming.”

Abortion is currently legal in Wyoming, pending a court decision challenging the state’s abortion laws.

On the national scale, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday about the federal government’s approval process of the drug mifepristone, a medication used to terminate pregnancies. A ruling is expected about three months later.

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The Supreme Court is currently allowing the FDA to continue regulating the drug while the appeals process plays out. Such regulation includes continued telemedicine prescriptions and retail pharmacy dispensing.

Fox News’ Shannon Bream, Bill Mears and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Users of popular social media platform outraged as app starts restricting political content

While Meta owner Mark Zuckerberg pumped big bucks into the 2020 presidential election to help people get out and vote, his company has begun restricting Instagram users’ access to political information in their feeds ahead of November’s election.

Instagram appears to have changed users’ algorithm settings to the default position of limiting political content – and users have been furiously reacting to the change online. 

Meta announced on Feb. 9 that a change to both Instagram and Threads was in the works, saying in a press release that it no longer wanted to “proactively recommend” political content from accounts users don’t follow.

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The company said that it would effectively be restricting political content mentioning “laws, elections, or social topics” from accounts not being followed by users unless they choose to do so, although the company did not go into detail about what it meant by political content. 

However, there would be no restrictions on accounts users already follow, Meta said at the time. 

But the February announcement did not say that all users would be automatically switched to the default position of limiting political content – which appears to have been the case over the last 48 hours, according to many users. 

“We should all be outraged but this overstep,” wrote independent journalist Jessica Reed Kraus to her 1.2 million Instagram followers. 

“Censorship during peak campaign months is a direct threat to the [sic] democracy.”

Grant Godwin, a citizen journalist known as “The Typical Liberal,” also ripped the move to his 2.9 million Instagram followers.

“Limiting political posts right before the 2024 election. Go figure,” Godwin wrote. “Share this everywhere and DM your favorite political accounts to let them know!” he went on to write in all bold letters.

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Users can check their settings by clicking on “content preferences” and then “pollical content” where they will find two options: a “limit” or “don’t limit” option with the limit option already highlighted.

It is unclear when the rollout took place, Fox News Digital reached out to Meta for comment, but a spokesperson did not provide a timeline. The spokesperson also did not say why Meta appears to have made the limiting of political content the default setting. 

“This announcement expands on years of work on how we approach and treat political content based on what people have told us they wanted,” the spokesperson said. “It does not impact posts from accounts people choose to follow; it impacts what the system recommends. And now, people are going to be able to control whether they would like to have these types of posts recommended to them.”

Some Instagram users said that when they tried to change their settings, the app crashed.

“The entire app crashes when I go to political settings. That’s wild,” one user fumed Friday.

“Interesting I went to my settings and privacy and content & went to limit, and it takes me back out of Instagram. It won’t let me change it!!” wrote another. 

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For the 2020 election, Meta CEO Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan poured about $400 million to two nonprofit organizations to help various government election offices across the country with work and equipment including ballot drop boxes, voting equipment, additional manpower, COVID-19 protective gear for poll workers and public education campaigns on new voting methods.

Democrats defended the money as necessary to conduct the election safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, while Republicans noted most of the grants targeted Democrat-leaning districts. 

In several states, counties that broke heavily for Joe Biden received more “Zuck Bucks” donations, according to an analysis by the Capital Research Center. House Republicans found in an investigation that less than 1% of the funds were spent on personal protective equipment.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Country singer’s fan goes viral after being invited on stage to sing at concert

During a Zach Bryan concert earlier this week, one fan enjoyed the experience of a lifetime when the country music star invited him on stage to sing.

The concert at Scotiabank Arena in Toronto, Ontario, in Canada on Monday drew tens of thousands of country music fans.

“Before the concert, I was hoping to get on stage with him,” Lucas Mason, 17, a local of St. Catharines, Ontario, told Fox News Digital. “I made a sign that said, “Darien Lake 2022, Lake Gardens 2023, can I play Heading South with you at Scotiabank 2024?”

Mason’s sign was hinting to Bryan that he had previously attended the “I Remember Everything” singer’s concerts and was vying for a chance to be invited on stage this time around. However, Mason’s sign was taken from him by security when he entered the venue. He believed the likelihood of a stage presence in front of thousands was now slim to none.

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Despite his setback, Mason got creative once again and purchased a Bryan t-shirt at the venue. He removed his own white shirt and wrote a new message to Bryan which read, “Can I play Heading South??”

“I ruined the shirt, but it was really worth it,” Mason said. “I was really trying to manifest it and tell myself that it was going to happen.”

In the pit, Mason developed quick relationships with other concertgoers nearby in hopes that Bryan would notice a commotion.

“When I was in the pit, I was talking to everybody there,” he said. “Everyone was really kind, and I’m like ‘Hey, guys, I’m really trying to get on stage. Can you help me out and point your flashlights at me?’”

And so the pit crowd did.

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A video posted to the TikTok account @greatamericanbarscene showed the moment Bryan invited Mason on stage. It went viral and has garnered over 10 million views.

“Right before he sang the first verse, he noticed everyone yelling and pointing,” Mason said. Bryan questioned whether Mason truly knew the lyrics to the original hit that is credited with kick-starting Bryan’s own country music success.

“I said, ‘I swear to God, I swear to God,’” Mason said.

After Mason hopped off the stage, he said everything felt like a blur.

“Walking out was insane,” he said. “I was walking out of Scotiabank with a huge guitar, so everyone recognized me.” 
 

And the train ride home was no different. “Everyone was chanting, ‘Play your guitar,’” Mason said. “So, I played ‘Something in the Orange,’ ‘cause he didn’t play that, and I also played ’Revival’ again.”

Mason began guitar lessons around five years ago and only recently took up vocal lessons with a coach. He plays small gigs of around 50 audience members, which he feels is an exciting number of people. He hopes to release a single or an EP of his own original music sometime in the next few weeks.

“I haven’t spoken to him since,” Mason said of Bryan. “I wish.”

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Child star says set of wholesome family show was like ‘Mad Men’

It’s been 50 years since “Nasty Nellie” headed to the prairie.

The surviving cast of “Little House on the Prairie” is celebrating its milestone anniversary at a festival being held this weekend at Big Sky Ranch in Simi Valley, California. It’s where the show was filmed during its nine-season run from 1974 to 1982.

“If you would have told us 50 years ago that this show would remain timeless, we would have thought you were crazy,” Alison Arngrim, who played mean girl Nellie Oleson, told Fox News Digital.

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“We had no concept that this show would still be airing on television 50 years later,” she shared. “We didn’t even know if there would still be TV in 50 years! We were stunned that this show became a hit.”

The Michael Landon-led series chronicled the adventures of the Ingalls family in the 19th-century Midwest. Despite its wholesome storytelling, life was different on set, the former child star insisted.

“It was the ‘70s,” she chuckled. “People drank, people smoked. [Landon] did all of these things. It was kind of strange you’re… on set and people are standing around with cigarettes and glasses of gin. It seemed odd, but that was TV in the ‘70s. It was like ‘Mad Men.’ [Landon] was so not Pa. But then, if you think about it, what a brilliant performance. Here was this man who came to work in his unbuttoned shirt, in his gold chains, in his Ferrari with his Marlboros, and then he turned into Pa Ingalls in a matter of minutes.”

Landon, who played patriarch Charles Ingalls, died at age 54 from pancreatic cancer in 1991. The actress described her late co-star as a straight shooter who smoked furiously and battled insecurities when cameras stopped rolling.

“Michael in many ways was a Hollywood person,” the 62-year-old explained. “Yes, he owned a Ferrari. He had fast cars. But… the show was therapy for people. And I believe it was therapy for Michael in a lot of ways… [What surprised me] was that… insecurity, because he was so powerful. He was the executive director. He was the producer. He was the writer and star of the show. He was everything. He was loved by millions, absolutely gorgeous, very much in charge… He’d be cracking jokes. He had a wonderfully twisted, warped sense of humor. He was hilarious.”

“But you could see that there were moments when he was trying so hard, ‘Will this be good enough?’” Arngrim continued. “He wanted it to be good enough to be perfect. And you could see that there were times when he’d get that look like, ‘Oh, my God, maybe this isn’t going to be perfect.’ And I think that was maybe the thing that drove him, maybe scared him. That it wouldn’t be perfect.”

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Decades later, Arngrim still views the beloved patriarch as “complicated and fascinating.”

“That was the most fun you could have on a set without getting arrested,” she said. “[He was all about] the jokes, the foolishness, always wanting to make the kids laugh… and then being very supportive and respectful at the same time. And then being an absolute task master… all at the same time, all day long. I don’t think I’ve met anybody [else] quite like him.”

According to the star, the pilot episode for “Little House” came out in March 1974. It wouldn’t be until September of that year that the series had its premiere.

Arngrim said that unlike everyone else on set, Landon “always knew” that “Little House” would stand the test of time.

“He told [co-star] Melissa Gilbert… ‘Long after we are all gone, they’ll still be watching this,’” she said. “And everyone he said it to shook their heads and smiled, nodded and went, ‘He’s crazy.’ No one believed him. Everyone said, ‘Oh, isn’t that sweet? He clearly lost his mind.’ No one thought this thing would be going 50 years later… We are dumbfounded. We are thrilled. We’re so grateful.”

Landon isn’t the only missing star whose presence will be felt this weekend.

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Arngrim was close friends with Steve Tracy, who played her on-screen husband, Percival Dalton. The actor died in 1986 at age 34.

“He was a wonderful person, so funny and incredible,” she shared. “He was older than me and treated me with respect. He didn’t go, ‘This dumb 17-year-old.’ He recognized that I had improv skills. So the comedic stuff that we did as Nellie and Percival, we were able to do that. We had a wonderful relationship and became great friends.”

“He got diagnosed with AIDS… there weren’t drugs for this,” she reflected. “There was no cocktail. They didn’t know what the heck they were doing yet. People didn’t live for years with AIDS. People lived for months back then. So when he went public in 1986 and told everybody he had AIDS, it was devastating to all of us… Back then, if you lived nine months, it was a miracle.”

According to the actress, Tracy lived for a couple of years after his diagnosis. During that time, he underwent a grueling experimental treatment. Arngrim thought it would save his life.

“It was very unpleasant, the shots,” she said. “It was painful. It was like chemotherapy. It was awful. I said, ‘Is this painful?’ He said, ‘Oh, yeah.’ I said, ‘Well, is it going to work?’ And he said, ‘No. It’s too late. It’s too late for me. It’s progressed too far.’ I said, ‘What?’ He said, ‘I’m just hoping that if I do this, they can save someone after I’m gone.’”

“That’s the kind of person Steve Tracy was,” said Arngrim, fighting back tears. “He was absolutely my friend. That’s why I started volunteering for the AIDS Project in Los Angeles and worked with multiple AIDS organizations all through the ‘80s, ‘90s. I wanted to help people, just like him.”

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The remaining cast has maintained a close bond over the years. During the coronavirus pandemic, Arngrim hosted live readings of the “Little House” books for fans.

She’s just as busy as ever. The star boasted she has bookings through November of this year, when she’ll reconnect with fans both across the country and internationally.

“The ‘Little House’ books came at the height of the Great Depression, and the series premiered when we were having a terrible recession and people couldn’t afford things,” Arngrim said. “And when times got hard in 2020, people turned to ‘Little House’ for comfort. People started making their own bread and all of a sudden, everyone was an Ingalls.”

“There’s a deep connection people have to the show, and it’s truly amazing,” she noted. “It really has stood the test of time, just as Michael Landon predicted. When times get hard, there’s always ‘Little House on the Prairie.’”

Bill Maher rips Dems ‘pandering’ to minority voters: ‘It’s not working’

“Real Time” host Bill Maher closed his show on Friday night scorching Democrats for “pandering” to minority groups for votes, telling them the time of relying on “identity politics” to win elections is over. 

“I do give a s— about who wins the next election. And outdated racial pandering is one reason Democrats lose elections,” Maher told viewers. “When Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi put on Kente cloth, I don’t think it earned them one vote for their powerful emotional ties to Ghana.” 

“Here in California, we’re now segregating kidnapping. Really. California doesn’t just have AMBER alerts for missing children. We have “Ebony alerts” for Black children and “feather” alerts for Native American kids. What is that, you look for them by listening on the ground?” 

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Maher pointed to statistics that show a “276%” increase in Americans who identify as multiracial and how “one in five” newlyweds are in interracial marriages. 

“You couldn’t do a remake of ‘Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner’ today because almost 100% of Americans approve of interracial marriage, especially with rich in-laws,” Maher quipped. 

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The HBO host then quoted Black celebrities like Idris Elba, Raven-Symoné and Morgan Freeman who’ve made comments shrugging off racial identity.

“The liberal group MoveOn.org formed in 1998 to urge Republicans to move on from the Clinton impeachment. Today’s Democrats should move on from identity politics. It’s not working,” Maher said. 

“It’s not working for them or for us. Democrats are hemorrhaging the very voters they think they’re pandering to. The Financial Times writes ‘Democrats are going backwards faster with voters of color than any other demographic.’ And suggests the reason is ‘a less racially divided America is in America where people vote more based on their beliefs than their identity.’ Exactly. Far-left liberals are living in an old paradigm. Americans don’t fit into neat little boxes anymore. Who has the number one country song right now? Beyonce. Lil Nas X won a Country Music Award and he’s Black and gay!” 

Maher went on to cite country singer Jelly Roll, who he noted was previously a drug dealer, a prisoner and a rapper, arguing he is a “giant middle finger to the idea of staying in your own lane.”

“In America now, you’re allowed to be many things all at once and that’s a good thing, even when it’s really stupid,” Maher said while showing an image of “Queers for Palestine” protesters. “We’re all Jelly Roll now. We’re sloppy, complicated and contradictory. Two-thirds of Republican voters support weed legalization. And 41% of Democrats own or live with someone who owns a gun. Ms. Marvel is Pakistani and the winner of the last two NBA dunk contests is White. The new Captain America is Black and Spider-Man is Black and Puerto Rican, just like AI George Washington.”

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“Latinos make up half of the Border Patrol and the name of the coolest Black dude on the planet is Lenny Kravitz. RuPaul has a ranch in Wyoming that does fracking!… Somehow the leader of The Villiage People was straight… The leader of the Proud Boys isn’t an old White guy. It’s Enrique Tarrio, an Afro-Cuban… Caitlyn Jenner is a pro-Trump trans woman who supports a ban on trans athletes competing in women’s sports… Our Black president was half White and our Black vice president is half Asian.” 

“My point is look, you’re still building your politics around slicing and dicing people into these fixed categories. Democrats need to get the memo that you can’t win elections anymore by automatically assuming you’re going to get every voter who’s not these guys,” Maher said while showing a photo of White men in suits from the 1950s. “The more you obsess over identity, the more you ignore the bread and butter issues that win and lose elections. The real issue is class, not race. And the real gap is the diploma divide. And the real future of the party and maybe democracy depends on Democrats figuring that out.”

Meet the ex-Dem congressman facing more federal charges than George Santos

A California Democrat who previously represented the Golden State in the House has been offered a plea deal over wire fraud, money laundering and other federal charges stemming from 2022.

Terrance John “T.J.” Cox, who represented California’s 21st Congressional District from 2019 to 2021, is facing a combined 28 charges — five more than the number of charges currently faced by former New York GOP Rep. George Santos, who was expelled from Congress late last year.

A hearing for Cox — whose plea deal was noted in court documents filed Wednesday — was originally slated to take place on March 27 but was moved May 22 due to the “extremely voluminous” amount of digital records, hundreds of thousands of financial records and reports and other evidence that Cox’s attorney will review to assess the offer, according to the documents.

Though details related to the plea deal were not immediately available, the documents confirmed the “defendant received and is considering the government’s plea offer.”

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Mark Coleman, the attorney for Cox, did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment on the matter. 

Cox surrendered to Federal Bureau of Investigation agents in August 2022 and was conditionally released at the same time after appearing virtually before a federal judge. At the time, Cox was charged with 15 counts of wire fraud, 11 counts of money laundering, one count of financial institution fraud and one count of campaign contribution fraud.

At the time of his arrest, prosecutors detailed in the 25-page indictment how Cox allegedly stole $1.7 million from clients and companies he was associated with from 2013 to 2018.

In one instance, Cox allegedly solicited a $100,000 loan for one of his companies in April 2017 but failed to pay the principal back to the two investors.

“More than $40,000 of [the loan] was used for Cox’s personal expenses, including private school tuition, credit card payments, mortgage payments and a $7,000 payment to Cox’s private political consultant,” prosecutors wrote.

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When Cox was a candidate for U.S. Congress in the 2018 election, he allegedly arranged for more than $25,000 in illegal straw donations by funding or reimbursing family members and associates after they gave money to his campaign.

Cox is also accused of providing fabricated bank statements on a mortgage application and fraudulently obtaining a $1.5 million construction loan to build a recreation area in Fresno. That loan went into default, resulting in a loss of more than $1.2 million, according to prosecutors.

The total number of charges faced by Cox exceeds those faced by Santos, who became the first House lawmaker to be expelled in more than 20 years after a vote by his then-colleagues last December.

Santos has not been convicted of a crime, but he has been indicted on 23 counts related to wire fraud, identity theft, falsification of records, credit card fraud and other charges. Santos has been accused of using campaign funds on a number of luxury goods and treatments such as botox. He has pleaded not guilty.

The 311-to-114 vote to oust Santos from Congress was strongly bipartisan, although slightly more Republicans voted to keep him.

Santos — who represented New York’s 3rd Congressional District — announced on Friday he would make another congressional bid to reclaim a seat in the House, but this time as an Independent candidate. He will run to unseat Rep. Nick LaLota, a Republican, who represents New York’s 1st Congressional District.

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Cox, now 60 years old, flipped California’s 21st congressional district in 2018 but lost to Republican Rep. David Valadao by 862 votes in 2020.

Fox News’ Elizabeth Elkind contributed to this report.

Newly approved cancer drug targets aggressive form of ‘deadly disease’

A new drug regimen for certain types of pancreatic cancer recently received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) — the first new medication in nearly a decade.

Onivyde (irinotecan liposome), an injectable medication made by Ipsen, has been approved for use along with oxaliplatin, fluorouracil and leucovorin as a regimen for patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPDAC).

This type of cancer is an aggressive malignancy with an average life expectancy of between eight and 11 months, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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The approval was based on a randomized, controlled trial that included 770 patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma who had not previously received chemotherapy, according to an FDA press release.

The group of patients who received the new regimen via IV infusion showed “significant improvements” in survival rates and response rates compared to the control group.

The drug regimen is administered via IV for 90-minute sessions every two weeks.

“I am hopeful that this regimen represents a new reference — meaning we will add to this in the future,” Dr. Zev Wainberg, professor of medicine and co-director of the UCLA GI Oncology Program in Los Angeles, told Fox News Digital.

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“We needed clarity on the data before proceeding, which the Phase 3 trial provides.”

Metastatic pancreatic cancer is one of the most difficult cancers to treat, Wainberg noted, as it doesn’t respond as well to new drugs that work in other types of the disease. 

“Patients are unfortunately often quite sick, and many cancers move too fast for a drug to work as they might in other cancers,” he noted.

Dr. Marc Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Fox News medical contributor, said the drug is “a useful new tool, but not a game-changer.”

“It works well in conjunction with other chemotherapies that have been used for widespread pancreatic cancer,” Siegel told Fox News Digital. 

“It works by interfering with DNA replication in the cancer and by damaging the tumor’s DNA repair.”

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Dr. Peter Hosein, M.D., associate director of clinical research at the University of Miami’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Pancreatic Cancer Research Institute, also commented on the new approval.

“Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease where meaningful progress is sorely needed in prevention, early detection and treatment to improve outcomes,” he told Fox News Digital.

Onivyde is a new formulation of an old drug that is “almost identical,” Hosein said.

“So, although this is a new approval, it does not really represent meaningful progress,” he told Fox News Digital. 

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Onivyde is also “substantially more expensive” than Irinotecan, the existing standard medication, Hosein pointed out. 

“There are many doctors and scientists working around the clock on this disease and the survival rates are slowly improving,” he said. 

“We need to continue focusing on breakthrough therapies that will truly move the needle to help our patients.” 

The most commonly reported side effects of Onivyde are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, decreased appetite, abdominal pain, mucosal inflammation, constipation and weight loss, the FDA stated. 

“All drugs have a safety profile that needs to be taken seriously,” Wainberg said. 

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“Here, most of the combination produced GI upset — diarrhea and sometimes dehydration — so prophylactic (preventative) management is critical.”

Fox News Digital reached out to Ipsen, a French biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Paris, France, for additional comment.

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Walmart CEO unveils one thing shoppers are always willing to pay more for

Shoppers value convenience so much they are willing to pay more for it, according to Walmart U.S. CEO John Furner

“I think an underlying trend that has really shown up and is with us and I think is here to stay is convenience,” Furner said during the National Retail Federation (NRF) 2024 State of Retail & the Consumer discussion on Thursday. 

According to Furner, “people are willing to trade off, in some cases, prices for things that are more convenient.” 

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During the fourth annual discussion, which centers around the health of American consumers and the retail industry, the NRF projected that retail sales growth would increase between 2.5% and 3.5% to between $5.23 trillion and $5.28 trillion in 2024. 

That compares to the 3.6% annual sales growth in 2023. 

Retailers, even industry giants such as Walmart and Target, have continually stressed on earnings calls that consumers are value conscious as they continue to battle persisting inflation and high interest rates.

However, NRF CEO Matt Shay argued that “the resiliency of consumers continues to power the American economy.”  

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“We are confident there will be moderate but steady growth through the end of the year,” Shay said. “Successful retailers offer consumers products and services when, where and how they want to shop with prices they want to pay.” 

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Furner believes that the companies that will “continue to win” are those that will continue innovating “to serve people in a way that saves them time, takes friction out of their lives, lowers some of the decision-making they have to go through.” 

Given that the pandemic is behind us, Furner said people are focused on looking for more ways to spend time with their families or experience things that they couldn’t do in 2020 and most of 2021. 

“The underlying trend of convenience, I think is with us and is here to stay,” he said.  

Yale pulls off another March Madness upset over No. 4 seed Auburn

Yale men’s basketball team rallied from behind to defeat No. 4 seed Auburn in the first round of the NCAA tournament on Friday night, marking the second tournament win in the program’s history. 

Junior John Poulakidas led the charge for the 13th-seeded Bulldogs with 28 points to help Yale come back from a 10-point deficit midway through the second half of the game. Solid defense in the final minutes of the game gave way to Yale’s 78-76 victory. 

“I don’t know if that’s the best win in Yale basketball history, but I will tell you that’s the best basketball team that we’ve beaten in Yale basketball history, as far as I’m concerned,” Yale coach James Jones said in the postgame presser. 

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“Princeton made the Sweet 16 last year, and we were at home, they beat us in the championship, and each and every one of the guys in the locker room were just itching to get our opportunity,” senior August Mahoney, who added 14 points, said. 

“Our opportunity presented itself. We know how good we are, so we believed.”

For the second straight year, an Ivy League team has beaten a Power Five champion in the first round. Last year, it was Princeton toppling Arizona. This year, Yale carried on the tradition. 

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“Every single person in that locker room believed that we were going to get it done, and we’re not done yet,” Mahoney added. 

Auburn’s loss was highlighted by the absence of Chad Baker-Mazara, who was ejected just three minutes into the contest for throwing an elbow. He was assessed a flagrant 2 foul. 

Auburn coach Bruce Pearl admitted that it was a flagrant, but he questioned whether it rose to the level worthy of an ejection. 

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“It was inappropriate. Clearly a flagrant 1. The fact that it was elevated to a flagrant 2 was a decision that the official had to make, but it obviously had tremendous impact on the outcome,” he said. 

The Bulldogs advance to the second round, where they will take on No. 5 seed San Diego State on Sunday. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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