Fox News 2024-05-05 16:04:09


Suspect arrested in raid on anti-Israel agitators reportedly ID’d as heir to massive empire

An alleged violent, outside agitator arrested at the anti-Israel Columbia University protest is reportedly the privileged heir of a multimillion-dollar ad empire, according to New York City police.

The New York Post reported that James Carlson, aka Cody Carlson, aka Cody Tarlow, is a “longtime anarchist” with no known ties to Columbia University who was arrested when police raided the encampment at Hamilton Hall on Tuesday. Carlson is being investigated as a “possible leader” of the group of agitators that broke into the building and occupied it unlawfully, NYPD and City Hall sources told the Post.

The report identified Carlson, 40, as one of three children of prominent advertising executives Richard “Dick” Tarlow and his wife, Sandy Carlson Tarlow. 

NYPD SHARES GLIMPSE INTO RAID REMOVING ANTI-ISRAEL AGITATORS FROM COLUMBIA’S HAMILTON HALL

Dick Tarlow died in 2022 at age 81 with an estate worth at least $20 million, according to court records.

Tarlow is most famous for his work with cosmetic and fashion clients, including Revlon, Ralph Lauren and Neutrogena, according to an obituary by AdAge. He was also a loyal supporter of John Jay College and the John Jay Justice Awards, Long Island outlet Dan’s Papers reported. 

James Carlson is heir to the family fortune and owns a 2,893-square-foot, three-story brownstone with four wood-burning fireplaces and a carriage house purchased in Park Slope in 2019 for $2.3 million, property records and online listings show. 

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Carlson has a lengthy arrest record dating back to 2005, with charges including burglary, reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, conspiracy and criminal trespassing, the Post reported.

Footage released by NYPD showed officers in riot gear using flash-bang devices and climbing ladders to infiltrate Hamilton Hall and clear the encampment late Tuesday.

Carlson was arrested and charged with criminal mischief, arson and criminal possession of stolen property in connection with the April 20 assault on a man holding an Israeli flag, the NYPD said Wednesday.

COLUMBIA PARTIALLY REOPENS CAMPUS WITH DESPERATE WARNING TO FACULTY, STUDENTS: ‘REMAINS A TARGET’

Three suspects approached the victim and took the flag, the NYPD said. The suspect who took the flag ran into a crowd and the victim was hit in the face with a rock thrown by a second suspect as he tried following them, police said.

A third suspect grabbed the flag and set it on fire, police said. The victim sustained minor injuries and refused medical attention. Carlson is alleged to have participated in the assault.

The other two suspects are being sought.

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Carlson’s 2005 arrest is related to a violent “West Coast Anti-Capitalist Mobilization and March Against the G8” protest in San Francisco, where protesters injured a police officer, fracturing his skull, and smashed several store windows, the New York Post reported.

Carlson and his attorney did not immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment.

Coffee shop owner doesn’t sugarcoat reality check for Biden on inflation

Small business owners are increasingly relying on credit cards to keep their businesses afloat, and some business owners are blaming the Biden administration for the rise in costs.

Maher Youssef, owner of Pluto Organic Cafe, told Fox News that his Seattle coffee shop has relied on credit cards to pay for costs as inflation has surged. He believes the Biden administration needs to refocus its attention to helping small businesses who are struggling in this country.

“I think Biden should focus on that. If he can’t do it, he should resign,” Youssef told “FOX & Friends Weekend” co-host Will Cain.

Findings published May 1 by Bank of America show that small businesses are reacting to inflationary pressures within the economy by racking up credit card debt to finance their operations. Since 2019, small business credit card balances are up 18%, according to aggregated and anonymized data.

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While inflation has fallen considerably from a peak of 9.1%, progress has largely flatlined since the summer. The latest government data shows the consumer price index jumped 3.5% in March, the highest level in six months.

The Bank of America report found about 28% of small business owners have had to raise prices as a result, with 25% of these owners citing inflation as their top concern, citing NFIB data.

However, Youssef explained to Fox News that he could only raise prices minimally in order not to scare away his customers. 

“We’re a small business, a small corporation, a small cafe. I can’t raise the prices. I can’t put the coffee for, like, you know, a couple bucks more. The maximum we can raise the price is — what — 50 cents, a dollar? Because if you put the prices crazy, people are not going to buy from you,” he said. 

SMALL BUSINESS OPTIMISM HITS LOWEST LEVEL SINCE 2012: NFIB

The coffee shop owner called on Biden to help out businesses here rather than spend money giving aid overseas.

“I’m just wondering, where is the money? Where are the taxes we’re paying? Biden makes us like slaves in a circle, takes our money and just puts it in Ukraine, Israel and gives it to other countries instead of giving to our own people. As an American citizen, where is the money?” Youssef said. “Where is my money? Instead of helping small businesses, helping the people here, they just go give it to a different country?”

“I think Biden should instead of focusing on different countries, focus on this country and fix it. If he can’t do it, he should go. Let somebody else take care of it,” he continued.

President Biden has blamed corporate greed for businesses raising prices in reaction to inflation.

In a February speech, Biden defended his administration’s efforts to bring prices down, but blamed large businesses for raising prices and “ripping people off.”

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“But for all we’ve done to bring prices down, there are still too many corporations in America ripping people off: price gouging, junk fees, greedflation, shrinkflation,” Biden said.

“Well, it’s going to stop. Americans, we’re tired of being played for suckers,” he continued. “And that’s why we’re going to keep these guys — keep on them and get the prices down.”

Fox Business’ Megan Henney contributed to this article. 

Stephen A. Smith snaps back at ex-MLB pitcher for calling him ‘racist’

The war of words between Stephen A. Smith and Jonathan Papelbon has continued.

The former Boston Red Sox closer went off on Smith after he criticized Mike Trout’s lack of availability following the three-time All-Star’s meniscus injury.

Smith said he was “disgusted with his lack of availability,” asking how Trout could “always” be injured.

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“It’s baseball, half the time, y’all standing out in the outfield chewing on pumpkin seeds or something…” Smith said on “First Take” earlier this week. “With these oblique injuries, you’re running around bases, catching one, then you’re running out for a fly ball, and all of a sudden, something gets tweaked. What the hell is going on?”

Papelbon caught wind of Smith’s rant, which led him to calling the media personality “racist” and “xenophobic.”

“That’s not what the game needs. Everybody wants to tune into the media, I get it. But at the end of the day, you have to be responsible for the s— that you say. And unless ESPN holds him accountable for the stupid s— that he says, guess what? He’s going to keep doing it,” Papelbon said earlier this week on the “Foul Territory” podcast.

Well, Smith threw the punches back.

MYSTIK DAN WINS 150TH KENTUCKY DERBY IN PHOTO FINISH

“I didn’t even know you were a contributor to a podcast until this morning. But I can go tit for tat with you. What I won’t do is disrespect you to the degree that you just disrespected me,” Smith said on his own podcast episode that was released on Friday.

Smith refuted Papelbon’s claims that Smith was banned from the Philadelphia Phillies locker room, saying that has “never happened in any sport.”

But it took it a step further.

“I’ve never had any discipline action exacted against me. Because I have never been professionally unethical in my career. That is a lie. Now, I could sue your a– for telling such a lie like that,” he said. “But I won’t waste my time.”

Smith then addressed the “racist” claim.

“I think that when people bring up the word ‘racist,’ if they looked at you and I sitting together, I think they would look at you before they looked at me,” he said.

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“I’m a Black man. We have a history of experiencing racism. And a lot of times, those experiences comes courtesy of people who look like you. And I would never think to call you a racist,” Smith added. “What you said is wrong, irresponsible, it’s petty. And if it was to get a reaction, it’s desperate. Because now that you don’t have your playing career to lean on anymore, I guess you need help in other areas… be a grown up, bro.”

For what it’s worth, Trout played in just 82 games last year after playing in 119 in 2022 and 36 in 2021. He hasn’t played in over 140 games since 2016 (but still won an MVP in 2019).

Trans runner dominates women’s events with times that would place last among men

Transgender college runner Sadie Schreiner won three women’s events at the Liberty League championship meet (Division III) on Saturday.

Schreiner, of the Rochester Institute of Technology, won the 400 meter with a 55.07, and the 200 meter at 24.14.

Both times would have been last in the men’s races at the meet, yet were school records in the women’s category, according to the site that lists the results of the meet.

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The 200-meter time also is now a Liberty League conference women’s record (beating Schreiner’s own previous record of 24.50 set earlier this season). 

Schreiner was also the anchor leg of the 4×400 that won by nearly three seconds – they were in fourth place when Schreiner received the baton, but she ran the fastest anchor leg of the race.

Schreiner’s leg was clocked in at 54.91 seconds, by far the fastest anchor leg of the race.

Schreiner, who was born a male named Camden and attended Hillsborough High School in New Jersey, has the 20th-best 100-meter time (11.72) for boys in school history (it would be the fastest for girls).

Earlier this season, Schreiner also set a women’s school record in the 300-meter at the Nazareth Alumni Opener Invitational, running a 41.80.

Schreiner’s 4×100 team finished in fourth.

MYSTIK DAN WINS 150TH KENTUCKY DERBY IN PHOTO FINISH

Schreiner recently posted on Instagram that she feels she does not have an “automatic advantage” as a biological male.

“Out of all the hate that’s been shared of me ‘cheater’ is the most common word used… In my eyes, the discussion of trans inclusion in athletics shouldn’t even be a debate…” Schreiner wrote. “As more research is done the more evident this becomes. There’s a reason I’m only as fast as I was in middle school, and the only variable that’s changed over my 9 years of running is my medication… 

“Even as Olympic studies prove the disadvantages of trans athletes it’s not enough. Policies are being changed before research is done and the only way to stay educated in this process is to talk to the few trans athletes that are competing and hear their stories, bring them in to the conversation. The only way to make an educated decision on a small handful of athletes is to hear their voice, not speak for them.”

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Six states sued the Department of Education this week over the overhaul of Title IX, which is intended to give transgender athletes more protection.

In April, five middle school students forfeited a shot-put event due to the inclusion of a trans athlete, and were suspended for another meet because of it.

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Audrey Hepburn’s iconic movie role still needs defending 60 years later

As 2024 is the 60th anniversary year of the release of “My Fair Lady,” starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, my wife and I recently sat down to rewatch the classic. A truly iconic film which was nominated for an astounding 12 Academy Awards. It ended up winning eight, including “Best Picture,” “Best Director” and “Best Actor.” 

However, notably absent from even a nomination, was the film’s lead, Audrey Hepburn. Why? 

Well, while most may not be aware of it 60 years after the film premiered, there was quite a controversy back then involving the casting of Audrey Hepburn in the role of Eliza Doolittle over Julie Andrews, who had played the character so wonderfully on stage.  

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While Hepburn and Andrews may have been innocent bystanders in the crossfire between powerful Hollywood moguls, it was Hepburn who suffered permanent collateral damage. 

As one who got to meet Hepburn in the late ’80s and assist her with a project, I have long believed that a defense of her was in order regarding this mean-spirited controversy. As advertised, she was the personification of elegance, class, kindness, and empathy. Qualities I used to pay homage to her in a little romance novel titled: “Channeling Audrey Hepburn – The Romantic Misadventure of a Lifetime.”  

With regard to the controversy over the casting of “My Fair Lady,” when the film was first announced – after the massively successful stage production which took place on Broadway starring Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews – many in and out of Hollywood assumed – and hoped – that Harrison and Andrews would reprise their stage roles in the film. One of those hoping so being Hepburn herself.  

After it was confirmed that Harrison would be in the film, but that Andrews would be replaced by Hepburn, Hepburn attempted to set the record straight: “I understood the dismay of people who had seen Julie on Broadway. Julie made that role her own, and for that reason, I didn’t want to do the film when it was first offered. I learned that if I turned it down, they would offer it to another movie actress. I thought I was entitled to do it as much as the third girl, so then I did accept.” 

Jack Warner, the all-powerful studio boss, had decided from the start that Andrews would not be in the film. He felt – as amazingly talented as she was – that she was an unknown and the investment he and the studio were making required a world-famous actress. 

A number of stage and film critics of the time were angered that Andrews was left out of the production, so seemingly sought out any excuse to take it out on Hepburn. They found one when it was leaked that Marni Nixon, who had sung for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” and Natalie Wood in “West Side Story,” had dubbed most of Hepburn’s singing in the film. 

What those critics did not know at the time was that Hepburn had been assured that her own singing voice would be used in the film. While Hepburn was not a naturally gifted singer, she could carry a tune … as she demonstrated while singing “Moon River” in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” a few years earlier.  

Nor did the plot of “My Fair Lady” require “gifted” singers. A reality Rex Harrison delightfully proved on stage and screen by “talking” his way through his musical numbers. 

Sadly, Jack Warner and the studio never had any intention of using Hepburn’s voice. As Andre Previn, the musical director on the movie, later revealed, they just strung her along to get her to take the part. 

One result of this unfortunate controversy being the perceived “punishment” of Hepburn by some of her Hollywood peers as they peevishly awarded the “Best Actress” Academy Award to Julie Andrews for “Mary Poppins” which, of course, was released in 1964 along with “My Fair Lady.” 

Some also believe that Hepburn’s legacy is still dealing with radioactive fallout from the 60-year-old controversy. During an interview with The Hollywood Reporter in 2010, Emma Thompson was asked about the “My Fair Lady” remake she was writing, and said, “I was thrilled to be asked to do it, because, having looked at it, I thought that there needs to be a new version. I’m not hugely fond of the film.” 

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Of Hepburn herself, Thompson added: “She can’t sing, and she can’t really act, I’m afraid.” 

Wow. I am a tremendous fan of Thompson, but that criticism is shocking. Great acting, as Thompson knows, is – like beauty – in the eye of the beholder.  

Maybe she was coming to the defense of her countrywoman Andrews, but to do so in that fashion after Hepburn – who won one Academy Award while being nominated for four more – had passed and could not defend herself, comes across as petty and small. 

On the other hand, to her great credit, just before winning her “Best Actress” award for “Mary Poppins,” Julie Andrews very classily stated: “I think Audrey should have been nominated. I’m very sorry she wasn’t.” 

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Then, when she did accept her award on the stage, Andrews cleverly wrapped the controversy in paper and a bow by saying: “My thanks to Mr. Jack L. Warner, who made all this possible.”

The fact is Hepburn gave an incredible performance in “My Fair Lady.” It would be “fair” and fitting if the manufactured stigma of her voice being dubbed could be eliminated by releasing the film with her original vocal tracks … as was her intention. 

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Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs sued again — this time for allegedly not paying $100,000 tab

Embattled entertainment mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs is facing another lawsuit – this one in a six-figure business dispute that alleges Combs left a New Orleans design firm on the hook for $100,000 in material costs after postponing the event it was meant for.

Raven PMG, which builds temporary structures out of steel, neon lights and other materials for events ranging from concerts to pop-up venues and art installations, accepted a contract to build a “red translucent cube” for an event Combs was supposed to hold.

On Aug. 31, 2023, another company working with Combs, Phantom Labs, approached Raven to work on the structure, according to the federal civil complaint filed last week in the Southern District of New York.

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A few days later, Phantom, also named in the lawsuit, asked for changes to the design, which tacked on another $20,000 in production costs, which another co-defendant named Mark Lupton allegedly promised would be paid by Sept. 8.

The lawsuit alleges that Phantom and Lupton misrepresented their funding and business relationship with Combs while negotiating the project with Raven.

Read the lawsuit:

Additionally, Combs, the billionaire founder of Bad Boy Records and the Sean John clothing line, among other ventures, is accused of interfering with the contract by allegedly failing to pay Phantom, which then stuck Raven with the bill.

SEAN ‘DIDDY’ COMBS $1B FORTUNE AT RISK AFTER BOMBSHELL ALLEGATIONS: HOW MUSIC MOGUL CREATED HIS EMPIRE

Representatives for Combs did not immediately respond to FOX Business’ request for comment.

On Sept. 7, Phantom told Raven to stop production because the music event had been postponed.

Specifics about the red cube were not immediately available due to a confidentiality agreement, a lawyer for Raven told FOX Business.

According to court filings, under the terms of the contract, Raven was due to be reimbursed for its costs, according to the lawsuit.

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“The current case is the first of many against Diddy and Phantom, as our investigation is revealing significant damages incurred by multiple parties, suggesting a systemic issue within their operations,” said Thomas Eisweirth, who is representing Raven.

The design firm sent Phantom an invoice for $96,732 but allegedly never received payment.

RAPPER SEAN ‘DIDDY’ COMBS’ HOMES RAIDED BY HOMELAND SECURITY

“In November 2023, [Phantom’s] CEO Gabriel Fraboni contacted Raven to apologize for lack of payment and proposed a biweekly payment plan of $18,000.00 to resolve the issue,” the complaint reads. “However, [Phantom] failed to make any payments under the plan, leading Raven to engage attorneys to pursue the debt.”

The lawsuit is seeking reimbursement for the material costs and another $200,000 in damages, plus interest, attorney fees and other legal expenses.

Combs’ recent troubles began in November when his ex-girlfriend, Casandra Ventura, better known as the R&B singer Cassie, sued him, alleging rape and other abuse. They settled a day later without the billionaire Combs admitting wrongdoing.

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At least four other people have subsequently sued him alleging similar abuse, and federal agents from Homeland Security Investigations raided his mansions in Los Angeles and Miami Beach in March.

He has not been arrested or charged with a crime in connection with the raids.

How Judy Garland’s hell of being starved on Wizard of Oz set led to tragic downfall

Fred Otash was determined to get Judy Garland to the other side of the rainbow.

The claim was made in a new biography about Tinseltown’s most notorious private detective, “The Fixer: Moguls, Mobsters, Movie Stars and Marilyn.” It delves into shocking revelations from his never-before-seen investigative files.

For the book, co-author Manfred Westphal was given access to Otash’s archives with the blessing of his daughter, Colleen. Westphal, who first met Colleen at Otash’s funeral, developed a close friendship with her over the years.

‘WIZARD OF OZ’ STAR JUDY GARLAND’S YOUNGER LOVER WASN’T SURPRISED BY HER TRAGIC DEATH: ‘SHE LIKED DISORDER’

Otash, a World War II Marine veteran, died in 1992 at age 70.

Westphal alleged to Fox News Digital that Otash helped the “Wizard of Oz” star briefly get sober.

“When Judy Garland filed for divorce from her third husband, Sid Luft, she was afraid to be in her home alone,” Westphal explained. “She feared that Sid might kidnap the children. So her attorney, Jerry Giesler, hired Otash to serve as her bodyguard.”

“He turned out to be her fixer,” Westphal added.

Life for Garland wasn’t always marked by drama. In 1935, the performer known as Frances Ethel Gumm caught the eye of MGM co-founder Louis B. Mayer. The 13-year-old signed a long-term contract and earned a Depression-defying salary of $100 a week, or $2,200 today.

But 15 years after she was discovered by Hollywood, Garland was spat out by the star factory. As a child, she was put on extreme diets to please studio executives who would heavily scrutinize her weight. She worked excruciatingly long hours on set, using stimulants, or “pep pills,” to keep her performing when needed. A domineering stage mother ensured those pills were taken. And as an adult, Garland was unlucky in love.

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Mayer, whom she considered a father figure, eventually severed ties with Garland. The actress, who was a drug addict and alcoholic before turning 30, suffered a nervous breakdown, was admitted to a private sanitorium, attempted suicide and underwent electroconvulsive therapy to battle depression, the book claimed. One of Hollywood’s most bankable stars was kicked to the curb.

In 1952, Garland married Luft, but the third time wasn’t the charm when it came to her marriages. Less than four years later, she filed for divorce, alleging mental cruelty. Giesler felt Otash would be a trusted keeper for his troubled client.

At first, Otash was wary of being a babysitter to a fallen movie star. But Garland would be paying $500 a day, or $6,300 today. To him, it sounded like “easy money,” the book claimed. 

And Otash was no rookie.

According to the authors, Otash was the son of Lebanese rug merchants whose life was marked by tragedy. 

He lost his father and only brother during the Great Depression, prompting him to drop out of high school at age 16 to join the Civil Conservation Corps to support his mother and sisters. He went on to volunteer for the Marine Corps and, at the outset of World War II, fought in the South Pacific. 

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Otash landed in Los Angeles in 1945, where he signed up for the LAPD. There, he made a name for himself as a renegade cop before launching his own detective bureau in 1955, which, thanks to his access to emerging technology, eclipsed his contemporaries. He served as a freelancer for the L.A. tabloid Confidential.

Westphal said that a lonely Garland “demanded” that Otash move in with her.

“Fred Otash moved in,” Westphal explained. “And when he did, he soon discovered her addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs. So, he took charge of the situation. Much to Judy’s chagrin, he locked up all the booze in her garage and flushed all her pills down the toilet. She struggled with withdrawal.”

“She had many, many sleepless nights,” Westphal continued. “She pretty much demanded or forced Fred to stay up every night with her into the wee hours of the morning. They would just sit in her living room, and he would patiently listen to her talk about all the trials and tribulations that she went through in her life. He knew that it would be good for her to get it all out.”

According to the book, Otash described Garland as “a crazy mixed-up kid inside a woman’s body, scared to death of living while killing herself with self-doubt, booze and those sh—y little pills.” As Garland was heavily sedated, the book alleged that Otash was thankful a nanny watched over her three young children: Liza Minnelli, 12; Lorna Luft, 5; and Joey Luft, 3.

The book claimed that Otash found pills scattered all over Garland’s home, including uppers, downers and “some pills he didn’t recognize.”

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But the late-night rituals paid off, Westphal claimed.

“It truly was beneficial,” he said. “When that 30-day period was over, she was clean. And his work helped reconcile her marriage to Sid Luft. And they became good friends throughout the process. Fred had a great affection for her. He had even become quite attached to her children.”

According to the book, Otash later recalled: “One day, a terribly shy Liza, caught in that awkward stage between a little girl and a young lady, came out to the back of the house where I was washing my car, and she thanked me for helping her mother.”

Garland’s victory was brief. The book noted that her marriage to Luft, the longest of her life, came to an end in 1965 when she filed for divorce for the last time. Garland was awarded full custody of her children. 

Her life further spiraled. After her marriage to husband No. 4 ended in 1969, Garland found herself owing the Internal Revenue Service several million dollars after her agent embezzled most of her earnings. As she struggled with a crippling addiction to barbiturates and amphetamines, the one-time Hollywood royal was described as being “homeless,” crashing at friends’ houses as she hung on.

That same year, she married her fifth and final husband, nightclub manager Mickey Deans. Garland traveled to London for a five-week concert series, which was meant to be a triumphant comeback, but the star later died from a barbiturate overdose. She was 47.

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The book described how Otash remembered Garland “with great melancholy.”

“But for a while at least, Judy… poor Judy, looked like the kid who went over the rainbow,” he later said.

Warning after baby animals dropped off at shelter turn out to be less than cuddly creatures

The Arizona Humane Society is warning people to be certain that baby animals are actually orphans before attempting to rescue them — and to be sure of the species of the animal.

“Last week, a Good Samaritan found a den behind their shed full of tiny baby animals,” Jennifer Armbruster, senior manager of public relations at the Arizona Humane Society, told Fox News Digital via email. 

The Good Samaritan, not knowing what else to do, brought the critters to the Arizona Humane Society, thinking they were domestic animals in need of help.

TEACHER CAPTURES IMAGES OF ‘VERY RARE’ BIRD NEVER BEFORE SEEN IN US

There, it was quickly discovered that these animals were not typical house pets. 

They were baby foxes.

“The tiny babies were then transferred to Southwest Wildlife Conservation Center, which identified them as gray foxes, where they will undergo rehabilitation and [be] released to the wild when they are old enough to be on their own,” said Armbruster. 

She continued, “This story also serves as an important reminder that animal mothers offer the best chance of survival for little ones like these,” especially as spring is known as “kitten season.” 

Well-meaning people often attempt to aid litters of kittens they encounter, said Armbruster. 

This, however, is typically not necessary.

RARE GRAY WOLF KILLED DURING HUNT IN MICHIGAN, OFFICIALS LAUNCH INVESTIGATION

“Human intervention is typically not required … The best thing we can do is leave the kittens alone,” she said.

The mother cat will likely return to her babies before too long, and “it’s critical that the kittens remain in her care as she offers the best chance for survival.” 

Rather than immediately intervene, a person should instead keep an eye on the kittens. If, after eight hours without their mom, “then it is likely the kittens are orphaned,” said Armbruster.

ENDANGERED, EGG-LAYING MAMMAL SPOTTED FOR FIRST TIME IN 60 YEARS

The Arizona Humane Society and other animal organizations “offer Care-In-Place kits for underaged, orphaned kittens to be cared for by those who find them until they are old enough to be spayed/neutered,” she said. 

If, as in the case of the Good Samaritan from earlier, a person were to come across a litter of wild animals with no mother in sight, it is best to contact a wildlife rehabilitation organization, she said. 

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Gray foxes are commonly found throughout the United States, said the website for the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. 

They typically grow to be about four to five pounds, and they are about a foot tall at the shoulder, said the museum. 

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Female foxes typically have litter sizes ranging from three to seven kits, the same source said.

Fox News Digital reached out to Southwest Wildlife for an update on the foxes.  

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Mahomes defends Travis Kelce as partying persona takes centerstage off the field

Kansas City Chiefs stars Patrick Mahomes and Travis Kelce have won three Super Bowls during their time together. 

Mahomes and Kelce also have a close friendship off the football field, and the star quarterback revealed that there is more to the Chiefs tight end than meets the eye. When he’s not catching passes from Mahomes, Kelce is often seen partying hard and is known to chug a beer can or two.

But according to Mahomes, Kelce’s partying image is merely a “persona.”

“He puts on this persona like, ‘I’m partying, I’m drinking [or] whatever’ but he’s really super intelligent,” Mahomes told Logan Paul during a recent episode of the “Impaulsive” podcast.

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Mahomes said his friendship with Kelce helped them build chemistry on the gridiron.

“He gets on the football field and he gets open and I just know where he’s going to be [and] at the same time I think our friendship kind of built naturally,” Mahomes said.

TRAVIS KELCE’S LONGEVITY WILL COME DOWN TO THESE FACTORS, EX-NFL STAR VERNON DAVIS SAYS

The 28-year-old Chiefs quarterback is married to Brittany Mahomes and the couple share two children. Mahomes joked that he has put his partying days on the back burner and said he struggles to keep pace with Travis and his brother Jason Kelce.

“No, I cannot [keep up with the Kelce brothers]. I used to, I think, and then I had kids. You hear my voice now and I left early every night [when they were in Las Vegas for his charity golf tournament and gala].… You gotta pick and choose these days,” Mahomes explained.

The recently retired Jason Kelce is also a father. Mahomes noted that the former Philadelphia Eagles star likely faces similar challenges when it comes to balancing fatherhood and professional commitments.

“Jason has kids too, so he has to pick and choose, but when he chooses, he can go,” Mahomes said.

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Travis will celebrate his 35th birthday a few weeks after the 2024 NFL season kicks off, but the Chiefs remain confident he will continue to play at a high level for the foreseeable future. He recently agreed to a contract extension that makes him the highest-paid tight end in the NFL.

Chiefs general manager Brett Veach said Kelce has “shown no signs of slowing down.”

“We’ll certainly celebrate this with him, and hopefully we can ride this thing even longer,” Veach said shortly after the extension was announced. 

“We’ll just have to wait and see, but he’s shown no signs of slowing down. Everyone notices the kind of postseason he had; he just found an extra gear. These special players are always able to find that extra gear and, again, if anybody can do it, Travis can.”

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