CNBC make it 2024-05-26 02:00:55


These cereals have the most fiber, protein and other essential nutrients, new report says

Cereal is still a breakfast staple for many Americans. The quick and easy meal was among America’s top 10 breakfast foods in 2019, according to a survey conducted by OnePoll in collaboration with Dave’s Killer Bread.

Nutritionists highly recommend starting your morning with foods that will keep you energized throughout the day like protein shakes and whole grain oats, experts told CNBC Make It last January. And cereal doesn’t fit that category.

“I never recommend cereal to my patients to have for breakfast, simply because it’s processed. I don’t recommend anything that’s processed,” said Dr. Nancy Rahnama, an internist and clinical nutritionist.

But cereal is a convenient choice if you’re short on time, Rahnama acknowledged. If you have only enough time to grab a bowl of cereal, reach for ones that are high in fiber and low in sugar, she advised.

Here is a list of cereals that are high in nutrients like fiber and protein and low in added sugar, according to a recent report by Healthnews.com.

Cereals with the most nutrients, lowest added sugar

Healthnews.com worked with nutrition scientist Lauryna Nelkine to compare the ingredients of the 15 most popular cereals in America, “taking into account their sales volumes and ratings on major American retailing platforms,” the report states.

These are the cereals that had the most nutrients, vitamins and minerals to support health, and the lowest amounts of added sugar.

  • Highest in dietary fiber: Post Raisin Bran — 9 grams of fiber per serving
  • Highest in protein: Special K Protein — 7 grams of protein per serving
  • Highest in calcium and vitamin D: Multi Grain Cheerios — 200 milligrams of calcium and 4 micrograms of vitamin D
  • Lowest in added sugar: Corn Flakes, Corn Chex and Special K Protein — 4 grams of sugar per serving each

Cereals with high levels of added sugar

Here are the cereals that stood out as having the highest amounts of added sugar (with 12 grams of added sugar per serving each):

  • Lucky Charms
  • Frosted Flakes
  • Cinnamon Toast Crunch
  • Froot Loops
  • Reese’s Puffs
  • Fruity Pebbles

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Ex-Nvidia recruiter’s No. 1 resume red flag: It makes you look like ‘there wasn’t a whole lot of effort’

When you apply for a job and send in your resume, it has to pop immediately.

“A resume is showcasing you in a 10-to-60-second format on paper,” says former Google and Nvidia recruiter and current HR consultant Stefanie Fackrell, who’s looked at “thousands” of resumes.

Telling a compelling story and being as clear and concise as possible “is what’s going to win you in a sea” of other candidates, she says. This includes listing powerful accomplishments and keeping the resume to one-to-two pages, depending on the length of your career.

There are also some red flags Fackrell advises people to avoid. Here are three.

A list of your day-to-day duties

To begin with, avoid listing your daily to-do list under each title.

“Where a lot of people make mistakes on their resume is they’re listing out their daily job duties,” she says. Instead, your resume “should be a list of your accomplishments, mixed in with some job duties.”

Recruiters don’t need to see that you wrote emails and coordinated meetings. They need to see that you completed critical projects, brought in revenue and generally helped the company grow.

Listing out job duties alone not only leaves hiring mangers wondering how you contributed, it makes them think “there wasn’t a whole lot of effort put into” writing the resume, says Fackrell. To a recruiter, that doesn’t bode well for the kind of effort you’d put into the job itself.

Colorful fonts, charts and graphs

Another red flag is a colorful resume with all sorts of graphics.

“When I used to work at Google, people would always submit artistic resumes with charts and the Google colors,” she says. Instead of writing one list of titles and accomplishments spanning the width of the page, they’d split their resume up into columns and quadrants.

Using a simple, straightforward format lets your accomplishments speak for themselves — by creating these colorful resumes, “you’re just being a little gimmicky,” says Fackrell. Some of these resumes are also “not easily readable,” which makes your qualifications harder to discern.

When it comes to how to format your resume, “make it boring,” she says, adding, “no colors, no charts, no graphs, no pictures.”

Only listing years of employment

One final element Fackrell notices on a resume is how dates are presented.

When listing the duration of employment in a given role, some people only list years. Someone might say they were at a company from 2021 to 2022, but “December 2021 to January 2022 is a lot different than January 2021 to December 2022, right?” she says.

This won’t necessarily be a red flag, but it will give recruiters pause and make them think, “what are they trying to get away with?” Fackrell says. She recommends using month and year every time.

Some internal application systems also require a candidate to list both their month and years of employment with former companies. In those cases, an applicant won’t be able to get away with leaving that information out of their resume. A recruiter will just go into the system and pull it out.

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Angela Bassett: My mom used this 5-word phrase to raise highly successful children

Years before actress Angela Bassett became an award-winning Hollywood fixture, her mother was dead set on raising her children to succeed.

Bassett grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida, where her mother “demanded nothing less than excellence from her daughters,” she told the graduating class at Spelman College in Atlanta on Sunday.

“My sister and I … were taught from a young age to dream bigger than what we saw around us every day,” said Bassett, 65. “One of my mother’s favorite things to say to us was, ‘I don’t have average children.’”

“Being Betty Bassett’s daughter meant that there were expectations that I would make something of my life,” she added.

High expectations can indeed help parents raise successful kids. Children are less likely to develop resilience and perseverance if they’re coddled, research shows — and those traits are key elements for building enough confidence to respond to failures and take calculated risks.

The optimism Bassett’s mother displayed could also be a positive parenting trait, experts say. Practicing optimism around your kids naturally encourages them to view challenges as obstacles to overcome, instead of reasons to give up, educational psychologist and parenting expert Michele Borba told CNBC Make It last year.

“That’s probably one of the highest correlations of success,” Borba said. “It’s a child who says, ‘I’ll just keep chunking it and keep on doing it’ … As opposed to: ‘Why should I bother and try?’”

Some parenting experts might push back against one element of Bassett’s upbringing: The actress’ family questioned her choice to pursue a career as an artist, concerned about whether she could make a living in entertainment, Bassett said.

Supporting your children’s passions, despite any misgivings around potential future earnings, is a good move for any parent to make, parenting expert Margot Machol Bisnow told Make It last year. Showing your kids how much you trust them can give them the confidence they’ll need to succeed as adults, no matter the path they end up following, said Bisnow.

In Bassett’s case, she was undeterred from focusing on “what I knew was my purpose,” she told Spelman’s graduating class. She obtained three degrees from Yale University, including an MFA in drama and an honorary doctorate.

Her accolades include an honorary Oscar, two Golden Globes and two acting Oscar nominations.

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This couple was saving for their first home in Chicago, but bought a $25,000 house in Italy instead

Kristina Knighten and her husband, Paul Cordier, were living in the United Arab Emirates and working as TEFL-certified teachers when they decided they were serious about buying their first home in America.

Knighten, 38, was raised in the Chicago suburbs, and Cordier, 45, was raised in London but loved the idea of living just outside the Windy City after having visited with Knighten over the course of their relationship and two-year marriage.

“We knew we didn’t necessarily want to move back straight away but more as a long-term investment and we could maybe retire there,” Knighten tells CNBC Make It.

The couple lived in the UAE and had just under $40,000 saved.

Knighten and Cordier worked with a real estate agent in the U.S. to scout properties they saw online and started looking for mortgage lenders, too.

Their budget was between $260,000 and $270,000 for a multi-family home in the North Lawndale neighborhood of Chicago. In April 2024, North Lawndale home prices were up 26.6% compared to last year, selling for a median price of $307K, according to Redfin.

In 2019, while their agent worked in Chicago, the couple traveled to Lago d’Iseo, Italy, which they had fallen in love with during a European road trip the year before. Knighten says the pair had daydreamed about what it would be like to live there.

“We start looking up property costs to see if we could potentially afford it in the future,” she says.

During that summer trip, the couple found a house they fell in love with. It was a two-bedroom that needed a new roof and upstairs floor but it was on the market for 25,000 euros or $27,144 USD.

“What we ended up seeing was that we could buy a house outright with the money we had saved for a down payment with a mortgage for a house in Chicago,” Knighten says.

Meanwhile, getting a traditional mortgage in the U.S. was proving difficult for the couple since they were earning money abroad and didn’t receive traditional US-issued income tax documents.

They decided the search for a house in Chicago was over and pursued the Italian property instead.

“It felt too good to be true.”

“It looked like a house you drew when you were a kid with the pitched roof, the door in the center, and the two windows upstairs,” Knighten says. “It was really cute and just steps away from the train, steps away from the lake. It felt too good to be true.”

But the seller’s agent informed the two that there was already an offer in and the house was off the market. Knighten says that news was crushing because they knew it was the “perfect house” for them.

“Two days later, the agent called us and told us the buyers backed out and asked if we still wanted to see it,” Knighten says. “We took a tour; we just loved it but knew that it was going to need a lot of work. We weren’t scared by that because we knew we didn’t want to move in right away.”

Knighten and Cordier’s offer of 23,000 euros or $24,973 was accepted by the seller, with the condition the couple could keep whatever was inside, but the closing could not happen until the summer of 2020.

The seller wanted to wait in an effort to avoid paying an inheritance tax since he had gotten the house after his sister, the original owner, passed away. His sister used the property as a vacation home and it had been in their family for years.

The couple agreed to the deal, put down a 500 euro good faith deposit, and waited patiently to become the new owners of the house.

The COVID-19 pandemic prevented the couple from closing the deal in person, so they had a local friend in Italy act as their power of attorney and handle it for them.

When the couple finally traveled to Italy again in July 2021, almost an entire year after closing, they found the house “It was exactly how she left it when she left her last vacation.”

“The beds were made, there were nightgowns still hanging in the armoire, and photos on the wall,” Knighten says. “In some ways, it was kind of eerie because it felt like you’re walking into someone’s house, but it was also really beautiful because we felt like we’re connected to the house and the history.”

The couple salvaged as much of the previous owner’s belongings as possible and worked with the seller to send back anything he wanted to keep, including old black-and-white family photos.

Now the real work has begun

Knighten and Cordier decided the first thing they needed to tackle was a new roof. The original estimate was just under $15,000 but that was in the summer of 2019. By the time the couple closed on the house, estimates for the roof had jumped up to $40,000, which was over budget for them.

The couple started renovations on the home in March of this year and are currently living in a two-bedroom apartment a few blocks away for 700 euros a month or $760 while the work gets done.

“We kept saving until we could afford to do any of the work,” Knighten says.

In addition to the new roof, Knighten and Cordier are also planning on additional changes to the house, including moving the kitchen upstairs.

The two are planning for Cordier to do as much of the work himself as possible and are estimating about 100,000 euros or $108,578 in renovation costs.

Knighten and Cordier originally hoped that their house would be ready by the time their apartment lease is up, which is a few weeks from the time this article was published, but Knighten says that won’t be the case.

“Worst case scenario in my head is we move in by Christmas. I’m hoping it is in September, but we will see what happens in the next few months and readjust our expectations.”

For now, the couple is hoping that Cordier’s sister closes on an apartment she’s buying near their Italy home so they can camp out there for a bit.

“I’m feeling good about it. Something will work out,” Knighten says. “All in all, it was worth taking the risk to do the thing that you think or know is going to make you really happy even if you’re not sure how it’s going to pan out in the end. That is probably bad advice but I’m so happy we did this.”

Conversions to USD were done on May 22, 2024, using OANDA conversion rates of 1 euro to 1.08 USD. All amounts are rounded to the nearest dollar.

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A $1 bill worth thousands may be hiding in your wallet—here’s what to look for

Collectors will pay a premium for unique coins or rare bank notes. So, if you’ve got any $1 dollar bills lying around, you may want to examine them closely before spending them as they could be worth thousands.

Ordinarily, dollar bills each have their own individual serial numbers. However, in 2014, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing made a rare printing error that resulted in millions of $1 bills with duplicate serial numbers entering into circulation, according to PMG, the world’s largest third-party paper money grading service.

Although these special pairs of $1 bills with matching serial numbers were initially printed in Washington, D.C., and Forth Worth, Texas, they could be anywhere in the world after a little more than 10 years in circulation.

It’s important to note that the misprint doesn’t make these $1 bills unusable, and they’re probably not worth more than a dollar on their own. However, if you manage to find a matching pair, you could earn thousands from collectors.

A pair of $1 bills with duplicated serial numbers sold for $2,340 at an auction held by Stack’s Bowers in March. Another pair sold for $7,200 at a Stack’s Bowers auction in 2021.

Here’s what to look for.

How to check if your $1 bill may be worth thousands

First, you’ll want to locate the Series date, which is found near the picture of George Washington. It must read “Series 2013,” per WealthyNickel.com.

Then, make sure the bill has a “B” Federal Reserve Seal above the serial number.

Finally, check that the serial number ends with a star and falls between B00000001* to B00250000* or B03200001* to B09600000*.

There are a little more than six million of these misprinted $1 bills in circulation, according to WealthyNickel.com. However, there are more than 14 billion $1 bills circulating as of Dec. 31, 2022, per the Federal Reserve’s latest data available.

Remember, although you may have a single $1 bill with these features, the key is to find its match. One way to do this is by checking Project 2013B, which maintains a database of these unique banknotes. The project reported making its 16th match of 2024 in April and says more than 100 pairs have been matched already.

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