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What happens if Trump is convicted? Legal experts break it down

A Manhattan jury began deliberations Wednesday in former President Trump’s New York criminal trial.

A guilty verdict in the historic case could have far-reaching consequences for the 2024 presidential election and upend criminal case law in New York, while a not guilty verdict would give Trump ammunition in a potential lawsuit for malicious prosecution, legal experts told Fox News Digital.

“It seems this is an all-or-nothing case, assuming arguendo there is a verdict and not a hung jury,” said Trey Gowdy, “Sunday Night in America” host and a former federal prosecutor. 

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg indicted Trump on 34 felony counts of falsifying business records in the first degree. Trump has pleaded not guilty to all counts. 

LIVE UPDATES: JUDGE MERCHAN PRESENTS JURY WITH INSTRUCTIONS AHEAD OF DELIBERATIONS IN NY V. TRUMP TRIAL

Gowdy, who has been in the New York City courtroom where Trump’s case will be decided, said it was unlikely for the jury to find Trump guilty on some charges but not others. 

“I cannot foresee a verdict with some counts as guilty and others as not. Unless there is a lesser included misdemeanor charge, in which case there perhaps could be a series of convictions for felony and misdemeanor counts,” he said.

Louis Gelormino, a Staten Island defense attorney, agreed that the jury would render the same verdict on all counts “because all the felonies are pretty much the same.” 

“They’re just different instances of the same felony,” he told Fox News Digital. 

NY V. TRUMP: JUDGE MERCHAN TO PRESENT JURY WITH INSTRUCTIONS AHEAD OF DELIBERATIONS

The charges against Trump in New York are related to alleged payments made ahead of the 2016 presidential election to silence adult film star Stormy Daniels about an alleged 2006 extramarital sexual encounter with Trump.

Prosecutors must convince the jury that not only did Trump falsify the business records related to alleged hush money payments, but that he did so in furtherance of another crime, conspiracy to promote or prevent an election. Bragg’s allegation that Trump falsified records to cover up an additional crime elevated to a felony what otherwise would have been misdemeanor charges. 

Gelormino said that in 45 years of practicing criminal law in New York, he and his law partner have never seen a case like this.

“This is the most absurd, obscene case we’ve ever seen anybody try to get convicted of. And for this to be a case against the former president of the United States puts it way over the top,” he said. “Any citizen, anybody, should never be charged with these kind of crimes.” 

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If Trump is convicted, he would still be able to run for president. But what that looks like will vary greatly depending on his sentence. An appeal could take months or even years to resolve. And an appellate court would decide whether to stay any sentence or conditions pending an appeal.

Prosecutors will have the option of requesting that presiding Judge Juan Merchan increase Trump’s bail to guarantee his return for the sentencing hearing. This could also include a request for remand, which would place Trump in jail until his sentencing hearing. But legal experts say it is unlikely for a 77-year-old man who has never been convicted of a crime to be sent to jail. 

Gelormino explained that before sentencing, the former president would have to meet with a probation officer for an interview to create a pre-sentencing report for the judge. The report, which can take six to eight weeks to complete, would include a short biography of Trump and a recommended sentence. It would be sent to all parties, and the defense would have an opportunity to suggest its own sentencing terms. Merchan would not be bound by the sentencing report.

Probation offices are located throughout New York City, but Gelormino guessed that authorities would make special arrangements for Trump so that a former president is not waiting for hours in a lobby with other convicts. Trump, like any other convict, would have to abide by certain rules as he awaits sentencing, including that he must admit guilt to the probation officer. 

“When my clients have to meet with a probation officer, what the judges will tell you is you have to do three things. You have to stay out of trouble. You have to not get rearrested. And you have to tell the truth to the probation officer,” Gelormino said. “Meaning, they ask you about the incident, and every one of my clients that goes in there, I always tell them, ‘Just say to the probation officer you agree to what’s on the record because you have to admit guilt.'”

If a convict found guilty by a jury of his peers does not admit guilt to the probation officer, Gelormino said, the judge will take that into account as an “aggravating factor” in sentencing.

NY V. TRUMP: PROSECUTION SAYS THEY HAVE PRESENTED ‘POWERFUL EVIDENCE’ AGAINST FORMER PRESIDENT

If Trump is sentenced to prison, New York City Mayor Eric Adams has said the city’s Department of Corrections and the Rikers Island facility in New York are “ready” to receive him. Asked if Trump would be housed by himself or with the general population, a Department of Corrections spokesman said, “The Department would find appropriate housing for him if he winds up in our custody.” The department did not respond to additional questions.

Trump is entitled to Secret Service protection even if he is sent to prison. It is unclear how the Secret Service would coordinate with the court and correction officers to protect Trump if he is incarcerated. 

“I don’t think anybody knows what that would look like, God forbid that happens,” said Gelormino.

Another option is for Trump to be placed in home confinement at Mar-a-Lago, his Florida residence. New York and Florida officials would have to coordinate, but this would severely restrict Trump’s ability to campaign for the White House, said David Gelman, a criminal defense lawyer and former prosecutor based in New Jersey. 

“A defendant basically cannot leave their residence unless they have to meet with doctors or an attorney. Also, traveling would be off limits as well, which would be a tremendous form of election interference due to the fact President Trump needs to campaign in different states in the country leading up to the election,” Gelman told Fox News Digital. 

The third option is probation. In this case, the probation officer assigned to Trump would exert great power over the 2024 Republican nominee. Trump would have to request permission to travel out of state, for example, which would greatly hinder his ability to campaign. He could also be subject to searches, surprise visits and be forced to attend meetings at any time.

COULD VERDICT IN TRUMP CRIMINAL TRIAL UPEND THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION?

Gelormino said there is “absolutely” a risk that a politically motivated probation officer could abuse his or her power over Trump to keep him from campaigning. 

“Probation officers tend, at least in New York City… to be Democrats because it’s a position that’s politically motivated at the best of times,” he said. 

Trump has already referred to his New York case as a “witch hunt” led by Democrats and Judge Merchan as a “conflicted” judge in comments to reporters during his trial. Claiming unfair treatment by a probation officer with bad motivations would not be out of character for the GOP nominee.

If Trump wins the election despite his conviction, he will not be able to pardon himself, since this is a state case. How a sitting president of the United States could abide by the terms of his sentence after conviction for state crimes is unprecedented and unknown legal territory.

The other possibilities are that the jury is unable to reach a verdict and the case ends in a mistrial. Gelormino said, in New York, prosecutors typically will move to retry a case within two or three months, unless they can reach an agreement with the defense for a resolution that avoids trial. That outcome seems unlikely given Bragg’s zealous prosecution and Trump’s defiant proclamations of innocence. 

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If Trump is found not guilty, New York City Councilman Joe Borelli, a Republican, said the president would be wise to move on. Borelli helped the Trump campaign acquire the necessary permits to hold a rally in the Bronx last week that attracted 10,000 people, according to law enforcement. 

“I think he should just forget about it, move on and let his surrogates talk about the criminal prosecutions while he’s doing what we saw him do here in New York, which is actually attracting and expanding his base,” said Borelli. 

However, Gelormino said Trump would have an excellent case to “turn around and sue everybody involved” in the prosecution if he wanted to take the litigious route.  

“I think he’s got a damn good case for malicious prosecution from DA Bragg’s office. And I also think he would bring what’s called an Article 78 proceeding against the judge for malfeasance in his job,” Gelormino said. “I don’t know if that would have as much legs as the malicious prosecution case against the DA. But I’d imagine that, knowing Trump, and knowing how tenacious he is, that he intends to bring something if he is acquitted.” 

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report. 

First Lady Jill Biden warns of potential Trump victory: ‘We will lose all of our rights’

First lady Jill Biden said Wednesday there would be disastrous results and a loss of human rights if former President Trump is re-elected in November.

“We will lose all of our rights,” she said on “The View.” She had warned earlier that “we cannot take things for granted, and think of the Supreme Court for God’s sake. Talk about things getting worse? Can you imagine if we put any more Republicans on the Supreme Court? No!”

The first lady appeared on the ABC program to promote her new book, “Willow the White House Cat,” and her husband’s re-election efforts.

Co-host Sara Haines noted that women will play a crucial role in the upcoming election as divisive issues remain in the spotlight.

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“We’ve heard Trump bragging about stripping women’s reproductive rights, 14 states have a total ban on abortion, and now IVF is under attack,” Haines said. She asked the first lady how much worse it could be if Trump regained the presidency.

“Well, it could get a lot worse under a Trump presidency,” Biden said. “I mean, you have to believe him when he uses words like ‘dictator,’ ‘bloodbath,’ ‘third term,’ ‘violence,’ we’ve seen it, so when he says these words, believe him. Don’t think this isn’t going to happen.”

“And women’s rights? Absolutely, women’s rights and IVF,” she continued. “I mean, we have to have a choice, and Joe wants to codify [Roe v. Wade] and we have to. We have to fight hard so we get it back because, [co-host] Joy [Behar], you and I remember when Roe became the law, and we kept thinking ‘oh, this won’t be taken away,’ but we cannot take things for granted, because they can.”

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The first lady warned that the Supreme Court under Trump could get yet another conservative justice, suggesting this would mean losing “all of our rights, so we’re talking about women’s rights, gay rights, I mean we will lose our—”

 “Voting rights,” co-host Whoopi Goldberg interjected. 

Biden agreed, as Goldberg added, “All of this is up at stake.”

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Prehistoric discovery in US lake leaves experts in shock and awe

Wisconsin historians recently announced the discovery of at least 11 ancient canoes in a Badger State lake – including one boat that dates back to 2500 BC.

The findings were announced in a press release by the Wisconsin Historical Society on May 23. The canoes were found in Lake Mendota, which is located outside of Madison.

The Wisconsin Historical Society explained that two ancient canoes were found in a cache in the lake in 2021 and 2022. Since then, historians have found at least 11 other ancient canoes, along what they believe was an ancient shoreline that became submerged over time. 

Not all the canoes will be removed from the lake due to their fragility. In an interview with Fox News Digital on Wednesday, State Archaeologist for the Wisconsin Historical Society Dr. Amy Rosebrough explained the significance of the discovery.

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“The Indigenous peoples of Wisconsin and the wider United States fished, traveled, and traded extensively on inland lakes and streams, and until now we have not had a clear look at the canoes used in the Great Lakes region,” she explained.

“To put it in modern terms, it’s like trying to understand life in the Midwest without ever seeing a real pickup truck in person. Canoes allowed people to fish in deeper lakes, to transport goods over hundreds of miles, and to travel to far-away places. “

Rosebrough added that they believe an ancient village site is located under the waters, although it has not been found yet. Divers have found stone tools in the water, and experts believe that the lake is filled with other hidden sites.

“Lake Mendota is a hard lake to work in, however,” Rosebrough admitted. “There is a limited window of visibility for diving missions, and we are exploring non-destructive remote sensing techniques that might help this summer.”

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“Even without finding the village, the discovery of these canoes and the tools found within the first canoe that was found, human-worked stone tools called net sinkers, reminds us that people have lived and worked alongside the lake for thousands of years.”

Radiocarbon dating found that the oldest canoe dates back to 2500 B.C., which would mean it was built around the time Stonehenge was constructed. The canoe was constructed more than 1,700 years before Ancient Rome was first settled and 2,500 years before the birth of Jesus Christ.

All the canoes varied in age, with the youngest one dating back to 1250 AD. The archaeologist explained that the canoes “may have been intentionally cached in the water during the winter months, a standard practice to keep canoes safe from freezing and warping.”

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“Either this practice of storing canoes for winter was carried out in roughly the same spot over generations – perhaps because of a living area nearby – or we are only seeing a window into a much larger site that might span much of the lakeshore,” she described.

Rosebrough added that, though the Great Lakes dwarf Lake Mendota, the south central Wisconsin lake is small but mighty when it comes to archaeological potential.

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“The Great Lakes oftentimes receive more funding for maritime archaeology but smaller bodies of water like Lake Mendota have their own distinct histories and stories to tell us about the people who lived here hundreds and thousands of years ago,” she said. “We are proud to work in partnership with Native Nations in Wisconsin to discover all we can about Tee Waksikhominak and to share these stories now and in the future at the new Wisconsin History Center set to open in early 2027.”

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Kevin Costner recalls beating out Robin Williams for lead role in iconic movie

Kevin Costner almost lost out on the opportunity to play one of his most important roles to date.

The Oscar winner recently revealed Robin Williams was also in the running to star as Ray Kinsella in the classic sports fantasy flick, “Field of Dreams.”

“A good story requires a good script for it to somehow leap off the page and become a movie,” Costner told GQ magazine in a sit-down chat. “That little movie had gold dust all over it, not in the way that I thought it would be a big hit, whereas gold dust on it in the way it moved me personally.”

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The Academy Award-nominated film was released in 1989, and followed Ray, a farmer in Iowa, who hears voices and sees a vision to build a baseball field in his cornfield. Ghosts of baseball legends visit the field throughout the film.

“There was an interesting thing because Robin Williams, bless his heart, there was a moment when I asked the director, I said, ’You know, Robin Williams is a big star, as big as you ever wanna get,'” Costner recalled early in filming.

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At the time, Williams had recently starred in “Dead Poets Society” and was already rising through the ranks as a serious actor, thanks to starring roles on TV’s “Mork & Mindy” and in the film “Good Morning, Vietnam.”

Costner added, “So when he picked me to do it, kind of over Robin Williams, because it seems like a natural for Robin Williams, and he said, ’I’m pretty sure that Robin Williams hears voices in the corn. I’m kind of sure that you don’t. They’re gonna end up believing you, Kevin, because they’re gonna see how it works.'”

Throughout the film, voices echoed the phrase, “If you build it, he will come,” alluding to the baseball field Costner’s character created on his farm.

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“They might have said ‘voice,’ and I’m like pulling a piece of corn, I forget what happened, but it’s like, gee, I had to act like I heard a voice, right? So, I did,” Costner said.

Williams, a prolific comedian and voice actor, died by suicide on Aug. 11, 2014. He was 63.

Costner decided to take the “Field of Dreams” role after being “moved personally” by the script.

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“When I read ‘Field of Dreams’ on a couch by myself, the first page was sweet. Somebody’s talking to him in the corn,” the “Yellowstone” star said. 

“Okay, let’s keep going, and it wound its way not to a gunfight or to a car chase or to a big fight. Its journey took you to a place where you look, and you saw your father, and it’s Biblical for things that go unsaid between father and son, between mother and daughter, things we wish we would’ve said.”

He added, “And this little movie in the corn got me all the way, and suddenly it wasn’t a movie anymore, it was truth, and it was — ‘I wish I could have said that in my life.’”

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Man ordered to jail over how he showed up to virtual court hearing

A Michigan judge was astonished when a defendant charged with driving with a suspended driver’s license dialed into a virtual court hearing while behind the wheel of a car.

The May 15 hearing in Ann Arbor was for Corey Harris, whose case involved his suspended license. 

The assistant public defender introduced herself to Judge Cedric Simpson as Harris dialed into the Zoom hearing. 

“Mr. Harris, are you driving?” Simpson asked the defendant.

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“Actually, I’m pulling into my doctor’s office actually,” Harris said. “Just give me one second. I’m parking right now.”

Simpson was seen impatiently waiting for Harris to bring his vehicle to a stop. 

Once the proceeding began, Harris’ attorney asked Simpson for an adjournment for “possibly up to four weeks if the court would allow.”

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“OK, so maybe I don’t understand something. This is a driving while license suspended [case],” Simpson told the public defender. “And he was just driving, and he doesn’t have a license.”

Harris appears to be at a loss for words as the bemused judge appears astonished.

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“I don’t even know why he would do that,” Simpson said. “So, the defendant’s bond is revoked in this matter.”

He ordered Harris to turn himself in to the Washtenaw County Jail by 6 p.m. that day. 

“Oh my God,” Harris is heard whispering in disbelief. His attorney then said she would be calling him soon. 

Hidden dangers of new popular trend among parents: ‘A lot of gray areas’

Health experts are warning parents not to excessively share details about their children on social media, cautioning that doing so can have long-lasting effects on their mental health.

According to an article by the Cleveland Clinic, “sharenting” refers to “the act of digital oversharing, of excessively posting information, pictures, stories or updates about your child’s life.”

Examples of sharenting include publicizing private milestones in a child’s life, such as finishing potty training or a girl’s first period. Posting about a mistake a child made or an injury could also be humiliating for children.

Even more innocent posts like sharing a child’s positive report card can hurt self-esteem, Cleveland Clinic psychologist Dr. Susan Albers said.

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“Sometimes, parents unknowingly create pressure on their kids by crafting an idealized image online of who their child is,” she explained. “That can lead to dips in self-esteem and self-worth.”

Albers added that even if a parent’s post has positive intentions, the act of oversharing details about a child’s life “comes with a lot of gray areas.”

“Sharenting comes with lots of gray areas regarding a child’s privacy, autonomy, protection and right to informed consent,” Albers said. “Some countries have put regulations in place to ensure parents are sharing safely.

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“But we don’t have many laws in the U.S. that protect children online. Everyone has to figure out for themselves when their social media use crosses a line.”

The full effects of sharenting have yet to be seen, but experts caution that the mental health issues it causes have begun to be observed in teenagers. Albers cited her teenage patients mentioning their parents’ digital behavior in counseling sessions.

“Teenagers, in particular, bring it up because their parents are sharing information they’re uncomfortable with,” she said.

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“We need to understand the long-term emotional impact sharenting may have on children — impacts that we cannot see or fathom yet because they haven’t been researched,” she added.

Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel echoed Albers’ concerns in an interview Wednesday. He said sharenting can emerge when parents “obsess” over their social media engagement and try posting more and more personal information to get a reaction.

“Keep in mind that kids are already subject to ostracization, marginalization and feelings of loneliness and isolation because of how they are treated or bullied on social media,” he explained. “Multiple studies have shown that this leads to worsening anxiety, low self-esteem, depression and even suicidal thoughts in a majority of teen girls.

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“The last thing our kids need is their parents throwing gasoline on the flames through what is essentially exploitative treatment of their kids, whether it is intended or not.”

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Automaker issues ‘do not drive’ warning after increased risk of exploding airbags

Owners of nearly 84,000 older Nissan vehicles that are still equipped with recalled, unrepaired Takata air bags should immediately stop driving them due to a safety hazard, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said Wednesday.

NHTSA’s announcement comes after Nissan warned vehicle owners not to drive certain vehicles that were recalled in 2020 but haven’t been fixed, including the 2002-2006 model year Nissan Sentra, 2002-2004 Nissan Pathfinder and 2002-2003 Infiniti QX4.

“If you have one of these vehicles, do not drive it until the repair is completed and the defective air bag is replaced,” NHTSA said in a statement, noting that Nissan dealers are offering free towing, mobile repair and, in some places, loaner vehicles.

Over the past decade, over 100 million Takata air bag inflators have been recalled around the world – including 7 million in the U.S. – in what is the biggest auto safety recall on record.

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More than 30 deaths worldwide, including 27 in the U.S., and over 400 injuries have been reported since 2009 in vehicles sold by a variety of automakers due to Takata air bag inflators that can explode upon deployment, unleashing metal shrapnel inside cars and trucks.

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The issues with the air bags have been blamed on a propellant that can break down after long-term exposure to high-temperature fluctuations and humidity.

Auto regulator NHTSA said that “even minor crashes can result in exploding Takata air bags that can kill or produce life-altering, gruesome injuries.”

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The announcement comes as several other automakers have issued similar warnings to drivers of older vehicles to immediately stop driving the vehicles until they’re repaired.

Chrysler parent company Stellantis issued warnings last year to owners of 29,000 model year 2003 Dodge Ram pickups to stop driving the trucks until they’ve been repaired after one person was killed when a Takata air bag inflator exploded.

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Japanese automaker Toyota in January warned owners of 50,000 of its older vehicles – the 2003-2004 model year Corolla, 2003-2004 Corolla Matrix and 2004-2005 RAV4 – in the U.S. to immediately get recall repairs to address Takata air bags.

Reuters contributed to this report.

‘Harry Potter’ author regrets not speaking out sooner on trans issues

“Harry Potter” author J.K. Rowling revealed in a new essay why she decided to speak out for women’s rights despite facing pressure to stay silent on the controversial issue of gender identity.

“By the standards of my world, I was a heretic,” Rowling said about the moment she began to believe that the transgender movement was “dangerous” and “profoundly misogynistic.” “However, I kept my thoughts to myself in public, because people around me, including some I love, were begging me not to speak.”

“So I watched from the sidelines as women with everything to lose rallied, in Scotland and across the UK, to defend their rights. My guilt that I wasn’t standing with them was with me daily, like a chronic pain,” she confessed in a new book extract published by the UK’s The Times on Wednesday.

Rowling said that she was moved to stand up after witnessing how freedom of speech became under attack when it came to this issue in the United Kingdom.

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Her outspokenness to defend women, who were being punished over their views baffled some of her professional colleagues, Rowling claimed.

“People who’d worked with me rushed to distance themselves from me or to add their public condemnation of my blasphemous views,” she said. Critical colleagues couldn’t understand why she would willingly speak out against the “safe, generally approved position” on gender identity.

“The thing is, those appalled by my position often fail to grasp how truly despicable I find theirs. I’ve watched ‘no debate’ become the slogan of those who once posed as defenders of free speech,” Rowling wrote of her critics. “I’ve witnessed supposedly progressive men arguing that women don’t exist as an observable biological class and don’t deserve biology-based rights. I’ve listened as certain female celebrities insist that there isn’t the slightest risk to women and girls in allowing any man who self-identifies as a woman to enter single-sex spaces reserved for women, including changing rooms, bathrooms or rape shelters.”

Since speaking out in December 2019, the famous author has faced intense backlash.

Rowling said she’s faced death and rape threats. Stars from the “Harry Potter” film series have publicly criticized her and a transgender broadcaster recently reported her for a hate crime.

Rowling said these attacks have been “frightening” at times, but worth it, because she views the gender issue as “the greatest assault” of her lifetime on women’s rights. 

“Nobody who’s been through an online monstering or a tsunami of death and rape threats will claim it’s fun, and I’m not going to pretend it’s anything other than disturbing and frightening, but I had a good idea of what was coming because I’d seen the same thing happen to other women, many of whom were risking careers and, sometimes, their physical safety,” she wrote. “Very few high-profile women — with honourable exceptions, especially in sport, Martina Navratilova and Sharron Davies foremost among them — seemed prepared to stand up and give these women cover and support. I felt it was well past time that I stepped up too.”

“Ultimately, I spoke up because I’d have felt ashamed for the rest of my days if I hadn’t. If I feel any regret at all, it’s that I didn’t speak far sooner,” she concluded.

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Last October, Rowling confessed she felt so strongly about the gender issue that she would “happily” spend time in jail if her government made it a crime to “misgender” a transgender person.

“I’ll happily do two years if the alternative is compelled speech and forced denial of the reality and importance of sex,” Rowling posted on X after one user told her that under the Labour Party, that could mean two years in jail. “Bring on the court case, I say. It’ll be more fun than I’ve ever had on a red carpet.”

Fox News’ Kendall Tietz contributed to this report.

Iron Butterfly founder who sang rock classic ‘In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida’ dead at 78

Doug Ingle, a founding member and lead singer of Iron Butterfly, has passed away. He was 78. 

Fox News Digital confirmed on Monday that the “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” singer died on May 24. Doug’s son shared a statement that read, “My Father passed away Friday evening May 24 2024.” 

Doug Ingle Jr. continued, “It’s a huge loss and a crack in our family’s universe which will be a challenge navigating through this new reality. Dad was a truly wonderful person to know and be around. 

“He had a comical wit and always fast with comebacks that would cause spontaneous laughter making it sometimes hard to have a serious conversation. He will be missed,” the statement continued. 

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Doug’s son also provided a snapshot of his original announcement he shared on his Facebook page.

“It’s with a heavy heart & great sadness to announce the passing of my Father Doug Ingle. Dad passed away peacefully this evening in the presence of family,” Ingle Jr. wrote. 

“Thank You Dad for being a father, teacher and friend. Cherished loving memories I will carry the rest of my days moving forward in this journey of life.”

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Ingle Jr. did not share a cause of death with Fox News Digital.

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Born in Omaha, Nebraska, Doug was the last surviving member of Iron Butterfly, which was formed in San Diego, California in 1966. The band’s drummer, Ron Bushy, passed away in 2021 at 79. Bassist Lee Dorman died in 2012 at 70 and Erik Brann, the band’s guitarist, passed away in 2003 at 52.

Ingle was a member of the rock band through 1970. The band released their album, “Metamorphosis,” that year and broke up the following year in 1971. 

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The band reunited in the mid-1970s, but Ingle did not join. However, Doug did perform with Iron Butterfly several times before he retired from performing in 1999.