Fox News 2024-06-11 18:12:14


Judge presiding over Trump’s classified documents case announces ruling

The federal judge presiding over the classified documents case against former President Trump has denied a motion to dismiss some of the charges in the indictment. 

Trump’s legal team had sought to throw out more than a half dozen of the 41 counts in the indictment, which accuses the former commander in chief of illegally hoarding classified documents from his presidency and conspiring with others to conceal sensitive files from the federal government. 

The defendants had challenged counts related to obstruction and false statements, but U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon issued an order Monday saying that “the identified deficiencies, even if generating some arguable confusion, are either permitted by law, raise evidentiary challenges not appropriate for disposition at this juncture, and/or do not require dismissal even if technically deficient, so long as the jury is instructed appropriately and presented with adequate verdict forms as to each Defendants’ alleged conduct.”

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Cannon did, however, agree to strike down a paragraph from the indictment that defense lawyers argued was prejudicial information that was not essential to the underlying charges.

Cannon has rejected multiple other motions already to dismiss the case, including one that suggested that the Presidential Records Act authorized Trump to keep the documents with him after he left the White House and to designate them as his personal files.

Monday’s motion to dismiss the half dozen counts in the indictment is one of multiple pretrial requests and disputes that for months have piled up before Cannon, slowing the progress of the case and delaying the trial. 

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Additional arguments are scheduled for later this month.

Jury to continue deliberations to decide Hunter Biden’s as first son could face time behind bars

WILMINGTON, Del. – A federal court waits with bated breath for a verdict in the historical U.S. v. Hunter Biden criminal case after jury deliberations kicked off Monday afternoon. 

“Choices have consequences and that’s why we’re here,” prosecutor Derek Hines told the court Monday afternoon. 

Hunter Biden’s sixth day of trial, which is related to his gun purchase in 2018, kicked off with a brief rebuttal case from prosecutors before both the prosecution and the defense teams hashed out jury instructions with presiding Judge Maryellen Noreika, held closing arguments and finally jury deliberations.

The first son is facing three charges related to his Oct. 12, 2018, purchase of a Cobra Colt .38 handgun, including making a false statement in the purchase of a gun, making a false statement related to information required to be kept by a federally licensed gun dealer, and possession of a gun by a person who is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance.

JURORS MIGHT BELIEVE HUNTER BIDEN IS GUILTY AND VOTE TO ACQUIT HIM ANYWAY

Hunter Biden, who has a well-established history with drug and alcohol abuse, is specifically accused of lying on a federal gun form, called Form 4473, where he checked a box labeled “No” when asked if he is an unlawful user of drugs or addicted to controlled substances.

Hunter Biden has pleaded not guilty in the case. 

HUNTER BIDEN ENTERS DAY 6 OF CRIMINAL TRIAL WITH POSSIBILITY OF TAKING THE STAND

Prosecutor Leo Wise delivered the government’s closing arguments in the case, underscoring the phrase previously used in the team’s opening arguments: “No one is above the law.”

Wise told the jury that the evidence and testimony heard in court since last Tuesday has been “personal,” “ugly” and “overwhelming,” but also “necessary.” Throughout the course of the trial, the court heard testimony from Hunter Biden’s ex-wife, Kathleen Buhle, ex-girlfriend Zoe Kestan, sister-in-law-turned-girlfriend Hallie Biden, daughter Naomi Biden, as well as from a series of experts from the FBI and DEA in addition to the trio of gun shop owners involved in the gun sale.

Wise told the jury that the prosecution team has sufficiently presented to them evidence that before, during and after the gun purchase, Hunter Biden was a drug addict and knew he was a drug addict before filling out ATF Form 4473.

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“The defendant knew he used crack and was addicted to crack at the relevant time period,” Wise said, noting that the prosecution team did not need to prove to the jury that Hunter Biden used and was addicted to crack cocaine on the specific day of the purchase, just the time period surrounding the gun purchase. 

HUNTER BIDEN TRIAL ENTERS DAY 4 AFTER WILD TESTIMONY FROM EXES ON RAMPANT DRUG USE, TRASHED HOTEL ROOMS

The first son’s 2021 memoir “Beautiful Things” again took center stage on Monday. The memoir includes anecdotes from Hunter Biden that he needed crack cocaine every 20 minutes at the height of his addiction, how he met a female drug dealer he nicknamed “Bicycles” who sold him crack cocaine on the streets of Washington, D.C., and how he could serve as a “crack daddy” to dealers due to his spiraling addiction. 

“I had returned that fall of 2018, after my most recent relapse in California, with the hope of getting clean through a new therapy and reconciling with Hallie,” Hunter Biden wrote in his memoir of his return to Delaware after a stint in a California rehab. Wise highlighted that portion of the book, pointing to the phrase “hope of getting clean,” which Wise said shows Hunter Biden was using drugs when he traveled back to Delaware where he purchased the gun

HUNTER BIDEN TRIAL ENTERS 3RD DAY WITH CROSS-EXAMINATION OF FBI AGENT

The book was “key evidence that Hunter was using drugs,” Wise argued in his comments to the jury. 

Wise also again rehashed text messages Hunter Biden sent others the month of the gun purchase, including telling Hallie Biden one day after the gun purchase that he was “waiting for a dealer named Mookie” behind a stadium, and a day after that, he texted Hallie Biden that he was “sleeping on a car smoking crack on 4th street and Rodney.”

“The central issue in this case is whether he was an addict and knew that he was,” Wise said. 

“We’ve had his life in our hands, but not now I have to give it to you,” Lowell told the jury Monday afternoon of Hunter Biden. 

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Lowell laid out his argument to the jury Monday that prosecutors have failed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Biden knowingly lied about his addiction to crack cocaine when buying the gun at the Wilmington gun shop back in October 2018. 

Lowell, instead, accused prosecutors of playing a “magician’s trick,” claiming they rolled out “conjecture” to the jury regarding Hunter Biden’s drug abuse by not presenting evidence showing photos from October 2018 of Hunter Biden’s drug purchases or use, lack of evidence showing the gun he purchased was ever loaded or taken into public, and unable to show who got cocaine residue on the brown pouch that contained the gun when it was eventually collected by police. 

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Lowell and the defense team do not dispute that Hunter Biden has a long history with substance abuse, with Lowell telling the court earlier in the trial that the first son began abusing alcohol as a teenager before graduating to drugs as an adult. Lowell instead argued that ahead of the gun purchase in October, Hunter Biden had received rehab treatment in August that same year and hired a “sober coach” to help him stay clean. 

Lowell argued that on the day of Hunter Biden’s gun purchase, the first son did not believe he was an active addict and user, and consequently did not lie on the federal gun form.

“That statement, when made, was not what he believed to be false,” Lowell told the jury. “The word knowingly could not be proved beyond reasonable doubt.”

Lowell specifically walked the jury through the series of other questions asked on ATF Form 4473, which included questions such as: “Have you ever renounced your United States citizenship?” and “Have you ever been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence …”

The question Hunter Biden is accused of lying about states: “Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana or any depressant, stimulant, narcotic drug, or any other controlled substance? Warning: The use or possession of marijuana remains unlawful under Federal law regardless of whether it has been legalized or decriminalized for medicinal or recreational purposes in the state where you reside.”

HUNTER BIDEN’S DRUG USE: WHAT THE PROSECUTION NEEDS TO PROVE AND WHAT WE ALREADY KNOW

Lowell honed in on the phrases “have you ever” versus “are you,” arguing that the drug question asked in the present tense if Hunter Biden was using drugs and was an unlawful user of drugs, not if he had ever been addicted. 

“It’s time to end this case,” Lowell said. 

Hunter Biden was joined in court Monday by his stepmother, first lady Jill Biden, sister Ashley Biden, wife Melissa Cohen Biden, as well as Jim Biden, who is President Biden’s brother. Roughly two dozen Biden family members and allies filled three rows of the court’s audience area. 

Hunter Biden appeared to be more upbeat Monday as the trial nears its end. He flashed a bright smile a handful of times Monday, aimed toward family members and allies.

Jill Biden again took her front-row seat and remained forward-facing, seldom looking around the courtroom. During a break, Lowell joined the first lady for a few moments, and the two chatted and Jill Biden was seen smiling and nodding as she spoke with the defense attorney. 

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Wise highlighted to the jury that the “people sitting in the gallery are not evidence,” seemingly referring to the first lady and others in the Biden family. 

“Respectfully, none of that matters,” he added, even if the jurors recognized the audience “from the news.” 

US V HUNTER BIDEN: OPENING STATEMENTS TO BEGIN IN FIRST SON’S FEDERAL GUN TRIAL AFTER JURY SEATED

Prosecutors instead told jurors to focus on whether Hunter Biden was an addict around the time period of the gun purchase and if he knew he was an addict when he bought the gun.

“You don’t have his life in your hands. Was he an addict? Did he know he was an addict when he filled out that form?” prosecutor Derek Hines told the jury during the prosecution team’s final closing rebuttal, pushing back on defense attorney Lowell’s previous comment that the jury’s verdict puts Hunter Biden’s life in the balance. 

“The defendant was a crack addict and a drug user, and he had a gun,” he said.

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If convicted, the total maximum prison time for the three charges could be up to 25 years. Each count also carries a maximum fine of $250,000 and three years of supervised release.

A verdict could be reached as early as Tuesday morning. Hunter Biden did not testify in the case after Lowell floated the possibility on Friday and said he’d take the weekend to make a decision. 

Sports influencer backs Caitlin Clark after she’s left off the US Olympic women’s team

Sports influencer Rachel DeMita said she thinks Caitlin Clark being left off of the U.S. Olympic women’s national basketball team roster was a mistake.

Clark wasn’t one of the 12 players picked to represent the red, white and blue as they get ready to head to Paris next month to compete for another gold medal on the global stage.

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But because Clark’s popularity has skyrocketed since she stepped onto the floor for the Indiana Fever, DeMita told Fox News Digital in a recent interview that she believes Team USA missed out on a boon from a marketing standpoint and an opportunity to highlight the top women of the WNBA.

“I personally think it is, yeah. I think if you think of it from a marketing standpoint, firstly, she’s box office. The numbers do not lie. There is no other player in the WNBA who is demanding the other teams they play against to move arenas to make sure they can hold as many fans as they need for these games,” she said. “That’s the one player who is doing that.”

“A lot of people are saying she is not one of the best 12 players in the league right now. Maybe she is, maybe she isn’t, but I would guarantee that you put her on that court and there’s not going to be a drop-off in her game,” DeMita said. “She’s going to hold her own on the court. And I think she can do that against any of the other teams.”

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“I think from a marketing perspective, from a fan’s perspective, I don’t think it was smart. But again, the way she handled it when she was questioned, she said, ‘Hey, this just lit a fire in me.’ She was disappointed, that’s what she wanted.”

DeMita, who recently joined the BIG3 basketball league as a courtside commentator, said the American women will still likely bring home the gold but her point still stood.

“I don’t think it was the best decision,” she said. “But again, I mean, the girls that are on that team are fantastic. They’ll bring home the gold. But I think having Caitlin on that team would have brought so much visibility to the stars on that are on that team, the stars who also deserve to be in the media more and deserve their flowers and deserve their praise. So, I think leaving her off was, honestly, it didn’t just hurt her, it hurt the rest of the women as well.”

The media spotlight has gotten even hotter under Clark. She was a talking point again this month when Chicago Sky guard Chennedy Carter gave her a hard foul.

DeMita praised Clark for how she’s handleD the pressure with “poise and grace.”

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Going into Monday night’s game against the Connecticut Sun, Clark was averaging 16.8 points, 6.3 assists and 5.3 rebounds per game. She’s was also shooting 32.7% from 3-point range.

Apple announces new iPhone feature, Elon Musk immediately issues threat

Elon Musk on Monday threatened to ban Apple devices at his respective companies if the tech giant integrated OpenAI at the operating system level. 

Writing on X, the Tesla CEO called the prospect an “unacceptable security violation.” 

Should he follow through with the ban, Musk said visitors would have to check their Apple devices “at the door, where they will be stored in a Faraday cage.” 

The comments came after Apple announced a slew of AI features across its apps and operating platforms and a partnership with OpenAI to bring the ChatGPT technology to its devices.

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Apple said it had built AI with privacy “at the core” and it would use a combination of on-device processing and cloud computing to power those features.

Musk said it was “patently absurd that Apple isn’t smart enough to make their own AI, yet is somehow capable of ensuring that OpenAI will protect your security & privacy!”

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A community note under that tweet noted that Apple has created their own AI called “Apple Intelligence” and ChatGPT was an “additional feature within Apple Intelligence, is limited to Siri and Writing Tools and will require permission from the user for every use.” 

Musk sued OpenAI, which he co-founded in 2015, and its CEO Sam Altman at the beginning of March, saying they abandoned the startup’s original mission to develop AI for the benefit of humanity and not for profit.

He has also founded his own startup, xAI, in a bid to challenge OpenAI and build an alternative to the viral chatbot ChatGPT.

xAI was valued at $24 billion in its last funding round, where it raised $6 billion in series B funding.

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FOX Business has reached out to Apple and OpenAI for a response to Musk’s comments. 

FBI releases OJ Simpson murder investigation files for all to see haunting details

The FBI released roughly 500 pages in connection with the mid-1990s O.J. Simpson murder investigation in which the former NFL star was acquitted of killing his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman.

Investigators took a close look at the bloody Bruno Magli shoe print found at the scene, clothes, Simpson’s infamous Ford Bronco and hair samples.

Wednesday marks 30 years since the infamous double murder, which shocked the country with its brutality and dominated headlines for more than a year. 

Rather than surrender to police as he had agreed to, Simpson instead led police on an infamous low-speed chase through southern California, riding in his white Ford Bronco as fellow NFL retiree Al Cowlings drove.

OJ SIMPSON DEAD: GROUNDBREAKING 1990S MURDER TRIAL FOLLOWED LA’S HEATED RACIAL TENSIONS

Investigators went to great lengths to try and link the shoe print to Simpson. It was his size and came from a rare Italian brand that sold less than 300 of that particular model across the country, according to reports from his trial.

At trial, an FBI expert on shoe treads testified that he traveled to two factories in Italy as part of the investigation, the New York Times reported at the time.

But prosecutors were unable to convince the jury there was a link between the print and Simpson, and the shoes worn at the crime scene were never found.

Read the FBI files:

Orenthal James Simpson -OJ … by michael.ruiz

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PHOTOS: OJ SIMPSON THROUGH THE YEARS

The documents show investigators tried hard to find a link, visiting the rare shoemaker’s American retailers, scouring through records and interviewing shoe sellers.

Before the murders, Simpson had been photographed wearing Bruno Magli shoes, images that the FBI placed into an evidence filing labeled “K32.” In a letter to the court, an FBI analyst wrote that the shoes seen in those photographs were not identical to the shoes that left the print.

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The files also include details about hair samples and evidence recovered from other clothing items.

Simpson won the Heisman Trophy in 1968 as a running back for the University of Southern California, and in 1973 he became the NFL’s first running back to rush for more than 2,000 yards in a single season.

He earned the nickname “Juice” after an 11-year NFL career with the Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers. He had a turn in Hollywood and co-starred alongside Leslie Nielsen and Priscilla Presley in “The Naked Gun,” a police comedy.

Although the jury found Simpson not guilty of murder charges, his legal troubles continued for decades. He lost a civil lawsuit and was ordered to pay $33.5 million to the victims’ families. He never paid most of it.

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Years later, at the age of 61, he took part in an armed robbery. He received parole in 2017 after serving the minimum nine years of a 33-year sentence. At trial, Simpson maintained he was trying to get back some of his own belongings when he helped plot and execute an armed robbery in a Vegas hotel.

Near the end of his life, he remained in Las Vegas and returned to the public eye on Twitter, now known as X, posting reactions to current events.

Simpson died in April after a private cancer battle.

Family loses daughter after she suffers fentanyl overdose from taking just 1 pill

Amid the unprecedented prevalence of fentanyl masquerading as other substances, taking just one unprescribed pill one time can kill you. This is a reality that hits close to home for one New York family that lost their daughter in 2022. 

Paige Gibbons, a 19-year-old college freshman at Hobart and William Smith with dreams of becoming a doctor, thought she was taking a Percocet with her friends on Nov. 20 that year.

“She was at a friend’s house, the parents were home, she and her friend were going to take a Percocet, which she thought was a Percocet,” said her father, David Gibbons of Pittsford, New York. “Unbeknownst to them it was not a Percocet, it was 100% fentanyl.”

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At 1:05 p.m. that day, David and his wife, Kate, would see their lives change forever after a sheriff’s deputy knocked on their door to tell them their daughter had overdosed. 

“It was the loudest yell I’d heard in my life. I thought it was an intruder or something, because why was she screaming?” David said of his wife’s reaction to the unthinkable news.

Paige was with two friends when she overdosed. One had purchased the pills over social media.

One of her friends almost died, David said in an interview with New York’s Office of Addiction Services and Supports (OASAS). The other, who elected not to take the pill, “witnessed one of the worst things a teenager could witness in their lives,” David said. 

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“She trusted, maybe, her friend or her friend trusted somebody that they knew,” said Paige’s mother, Kate. “We just thought of her as a little naive in that respect. Unfortunately, it cost her her life.”

Paige’s death came as a complete surprise to her parents; they never believed her to be a troublemaker or a drug user, a belief that was corroborated by their later conversations with her friends.

“One mistake was obviously Paige’s worst mistake in her whole life,” David said. “We don’t want her to be judged for the worst mistake she made.”

“It’s caused havoc in our life,” David said. “The milestones I was hoping to have – a first grand-baby, going to a wedding, her graduating from college, her helping other people – none of these things are going to happen with Paige.”

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Paige’s parents said she wanted to become a doctor and “had her sights set high for doing something good in the world.” 

Although she died young, she left a mark at Our Lady of Mercy High School in Rochester, New York. There, the teen taught her classmates CPR for women. Her school only had male-bodied mannequins, her parents recalled, so she used her own money to get female models for her classmates to practice on.

With Paige’s aspirations cut short, her parents said they are sharing her story so that she can help others even in death and to potentially save another family the heartache they’ve endured.

“You take a pill, and you have a potential of dying that night.”

— David Gibbons

Their story is among several that will air as part of “Addiction: The Next Step,” a 30-minute film made by OASAS to educate New York residents about the growing problem.

“I can’t believe that we still hear people, you know, having this same exact situation,” Kate said. “I want to shout it from the mountaintops and make sure that everyone knows: Expect that it will happen to you; expect that you will die if you try this.”

“Think about this when you decide if you’re going to take a pill or do some drug that’s been presented to you. Do you want to see your mom’s face mourning you?”

“It doesn’t discriminate,” David said. “Socioeconomically, race, religion. You take a pill, and you have a potential of dying that night.”

Fentanyl is more than 50 times more potent than heroin, and 6,300 New Yorkers died of fentanyl overdoses in 2023. These overdoses are steadily climbing: 74,702 Americans died of fentanyl overdoses in 2023, about 500 more than the previous year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

The Drug Enforcement Administration seized a record 79.5 million fentanyl pills in 2023, far exceeding the 58 million seized in 2022. Laboratory testing indicated that seven out of every 10 pills seized by the agency contained a lethal dose of fentanyl, according to the agency. 

Pills that could contain fentanyl aren’t just limited to opioids. According to the DEA, high school and college students purchasing “study drugs” like Adderall over the dark web or on social media have also fallen victim to the substance. 

Dr. Chinazo Cunningham, the coordinator of OASAS, said fewer teens than ever are abusing drugs, but teens dying of overdoses are on the rise due to the lethality and growing prevalence of fentanyl. 

“We know with the internet and social media that kids can get what they think are real pills, but who knows where they’re made or where they’re coming from and what’s in them?” she said. “Fentanyl is finding its way into these pills and that can be deadly.”

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She also said that xylazine, also known as “tranq,” has led to an increasing number of overdose deaths in teens.

Testing strips for fentanyl and xylazine, as well as Naloxone – a lifesaving drug that can reverse opiod overdoses – are available to New Yorkers for free at oasas.ny.gov. Other states, like Ohio and California, also have initiatives to give free testing strips and Naloxone to residents.

UCLA campus descends into anarchy as anti-Israel rioters clash with police

Anti-Israel protesters set up a new encampment on UCLA’s campus Monday, leading to a police response in an effort to clear the area.

Demonstrators set up tents at Dickson Plaza, where a previous encampment that lasted more than a week in April and May was located before police cleared the area and arrested more than 200 people, according to Fox 11.

Protesters were also seen carrying fake bloody bodies and body parts, the outlet reported.

“We will honor all our martyrs,” the protesters chanted as they named the Palestinians who died in the war in Gaza, according to the Daily Bruin campus newspaper.

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During the protest, demonstrators stood at the top of the Janss Steps that lead into the plaza to prevent people from entering, Fox 11 reported.

University police and campus security officers responded to the scene and used bicycles as barriers to prevent more protesters from entering the area, according to Fox 11.

Demonstrators were instructed multiple times to disperse, according to ABC 7. The Los Angeles Police Department also responded to the campus and eventually declared a tactical alert.

Several clashes happened on campus Monday between protesters and police, ABC 7 reported. At least one security officer was treated for injuries.

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Campus police detained the Undergraduate Students Association Council President Adam Tfayli shortly before 4 p.m., according to the Daily Bruin.

LAPD told KNX News that 27 protesters were arrested by campus police in a confrontation behind Dodd Hall.

The protest dispersed around midnight, according to KNX News.

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Fox News Digital has reached out to campus police and LAPD, but both agencies did not immediately respond. 

This comes amid protests at various colleges in California and across the country amid the ongoing war in the Middle East between Hamas terrorists and Israeli forces that began after Hamas’ Oct. 7 attack against the Jewish State, prompting military retaliation from Israel.

The protesters are calling on their colleges to end all business ties with Israel.

‘Game of Thrones’ star’s serious health complication changed her whole perspective about life

Emilia Clarke opened up about life after her brain surgery and how the injury altered her “sense of self.”

The 37-year-old actress had two brain surgeries, one in 2011 and another in 2013, after suffering brain aneurysms.

“When you have a brain injury, because it alters your sense of self on such a dramatic level, all of the insecurities you have going into the workplace quadruple overnight,” Clarke told U.K.’s Big Issue.

“The first fear we all had was: ‘Oh my God, am I going to get fired? Am I going to get fired because they think I’m not capable of completing the job?'” she said.

EMILIA CLARKE REVEALS SHE IS ‘MISSING’ PARTS OF HER BRAIN AFTER SUFFERING TWO ANEURYSMS

Clarke explained she often worried she would suffer another brain hemorrhage while filming or while appearing on TV.

“Well, if I’m going to die, I better die on live TV,” she recalled thinking.

Clarke suffered her first aneurysm in 2011, shortly after the actress wrapped filming on the hit HBO show “Game of Thrones.”

In 2013, a surgery to remove another aneurysm doctors had found failed and Clarke was left with a brain bleed.

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“I spent a month in the hospital again and, at certain points, I lost all hope,” Clarke wrote in an essay for the New Yorker. “I couldn’t look anyone in the eye. There was terrible anxiety, panic attacks. I was raised never to say, ‘It’s not fair’; I was taught to remember that there is always someone who is worse off than you. But, going through this experience for the second time, all hope receded.”

“I felt like a shell of myself,” she added. “So much so that I now have a hard time remembering those dark days in much detail. My mind has blocked them out. But I do remember being convinced that I wasn’t going to live.”

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Clarke later revealed parts of her brain were missing after the two aneurysms.

“I am in the really, really, really small minority of people that can survive that… There’s quite a bit missing!” Clarke explained on BBC One. 

“Because strokes, basically, as soon as any part of your brain doesn’t get blood for a second, it’s gone. And so the blood finds a different route to get around but then whatever bit it’s missing is therefore gone.”

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‘Deadliest Catch’ captain over 20 seasons shares biggest challenge on hit show

Sig Hansen has seen a consistent challenge over the past 20 seasons as captain on “Deadliest Catch.”

In an interview with Fox News Digital, Hansen explained that although the crew face many challenges while on the Bering Sea, the weather is a constant struggle for members on board.

“I mean, there’s always a challenge. The challenge is to succeed, right?” Hansen said. “There are life-threatening situations – been in a few of those. I think the biggest challenge is always the weather. That’s always a big one and keeping your guys motivated, that’s always a big challenge.” 

The captain continued, “You know, and finding crab. It’ll happen, it just takes time, but it’ll happen. Especially if you’re good and you know what you’re doing.”

‘DEADLIEST CATCH’ STAR JOSH HARRIS SAYS HE ‘RESENTED FISHING’ AFTER LOSING HIS FATHER PHIL HARRIS IN 2010

There have been several life-threatening situations Hansen has been in over the years.

“We’ve had events where the boat was icing down to the point where I thought there was no return. We’ve had struggles with mechanical issues where, you know, we’ve had, like, tanks where our crab tanks either fill with water when they’re not supposed to, and that creates instability on the boat. Things of that nature,” Hansen said. 

WATCH: ‘Deadliest Catch’ captain Sig Hansen shares biggest challenge while at sea

“There’s been many challenges and there were challenges where I’ve seen boats literally go down. You know, eight miles away from me, and there’s nothing I can do about it,” he continued. “You watch people and friends that you know, and you’re literally in the fog. They’re right over there and there’s nothing I can do about it, and they’re gone. 

“They’re right over there and there’s nothing I can do about it, and they’re gone.”

— Sig Hansen

“I think that’s a godd–n challenge,” Sig concluded.

Discovery Channel will release the 20th season of “Deadliest Catch” on June 11. The new season stars Captain Jake Anderson rejoining Hansen as a greenhorn on his ship after he lost his own boat.

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Hansen explained that the reason “Deadliest Catch” has been so successful is because it’s multi-generational, despite the fact that it was never intended to be a show for the entire family.

“Number one, It’s blue collar and there’s a work ethic and I think people respect that. I think the show’s successful because, through time, the photography’s better, the cameras are better, the people that record what we do are better, and I think that it shows,” Hansen said. “My wife and I watch what they film, and she just can’t believe it. She’s like, ‘Oh my God, I feel like I’m in it.'” 

He continued, “Twenty years ago, that was not the case. So, I think it brings you closer; it brings you into our living room, and I think it’s successful because it’s multi-generational. Grandma, grandpa watches, grandson, granddaughter. It’s just multi-generational, and I’ve said it before: This was not meant to be a family program. We do have foul language. We do horrible things that should not be done, and families watch it together. It ain’t a family program, but that’s what it turned out to be.”

WATCH: Sig Hansen shares life-threatening experiences he’s faced on ‘Deadliest Catch’

Being captain of the F/V Northwestern for the last 20 seasons has made Hansen able to be “recognized everywhere on the planet,” but that’s not the most rewarding aspect for him.

“What’s rewarding is the fact that when people come up to me, and they say, ‘You know what? You inspire me. I was in the hospital and I watched your show, and I sucked it up,'” Hansen said.

He continued, “When people tell me that they’re inspired by us, that’s rewarding. Or if I go to a fundraiser and I make oodles of money for a certain cause because I used my fame to do it, that’s pretty godd–n rewarding.”

When “Deadliest Catch” released its first season in 2005, Sig recalled to Fox News Digital that the show would be “lucky” to make it to 10 years.

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“Now I feel like that show is on autopilot,” he said. “What goes through my mind is like, you take some things for granted. I know that’s not just me, but everybody takes it for granted because they’re supposed to be there.” 

He echoed his earlier sentiment that “Deadliest Catch” has become a show for all generations over the years. 

WATCH: Sig Hansen shares why ‘Deadliest Catch’ has been so successful for 20 seasons 

“It’s just crazy because everywhere I go, whether it’s young or old, It’s like this generational tie. There’s a generational knot that puts people together, and it just blows my mind,” Hansen said.

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Fans can catch Sig and the “Deadliest Catch” crew navigating the Bering Sea for the 20th season on Discovery Channel starting June 11.

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